You are here

G2. Local Greens

Legislative Analyst’s Office Slams CARB’s Climate Plan

Sunflower Alliance - Sun, 01/08/2023 - 12:37

CalMatters environment reporter Nadia Lopez recently summarized a “scathing report” from the state’s nonpartisan Legislative Analyst’s Office on the California Air Resources Board’s recently adopted state climate plan.

Check out her summary and links, and stay tuned for information on how to join the statewide climate justice coalition to push the state to do far … Read more

Categories: G2. Local Greens

Our Letter to CARB on Renewable Diesel

Sunflower Alliance - Sun, 01/08/2023 - 12:15

 

The California Air Resources Board is currently reviewing potential changes to its Low Carbon Fuel Standard, designed to decrease the carbon intensity of transportation fuels.  We submitted this letter as public comment during their November 2022 workshop.

 

Cheryl Laskowski, Branch Chief – Low Carbon Fuel Standard
California Air Resources Board
1001 I Street… Read more

Categories: G2. Local Greens

Montana tries again on annual fees for electric vehicles

Montana Environmental Information Center - Sun, 01/08/2023 - 12:13

By Blair Miller, Daily Montanan Another attempt to impose annual fees on electric vehicles in Montana saw its first legislative committee hearing Friday following Gov. Greg Gianforte’s 2021 veto of a similar measure — and extensive work done since by an interim committee to come up with what the sponsor says is a good compromise. House Bill …

The post Montana tries again on annual fees for electric vehicles appeared first on Montana Environmental Information Center - MEIC.

Categories: G2. Local Greens

Restore the Delta and River Partners presents “Hell or High Water: How Stockton Can Prepare for the Risk of Flood Disaster” a virtual symposium on January 26th. 

Restore The San Francisco Bay Area Delta - Sun, 01/08/2023 - 09:09

This symposium will be led by panelists from local and state government entities, community leaders, flood experts and esteemed researchers who will provide insight on flood management issues, their solutions and will inform the public on what to expect from the capitol regarding investments in flood protection. This event will cover various topics that will explore Stockton’s Growing Flood Risk, Flood Risk from the Community Perspective, The View from the Capitol, and Planning and Building Solutions. 

With atmospheric storms on the rise, it is imperative that we talk through potential and projected risks, have transparency on flood infrastructure improvement challenges, and discuss the solutions on the local and state level. 

Speakers include Congressman Josh Harder, Stockton City Council Womxn Kimberly Warmsley, UCLA Climate Scientist Daniel Swain, the Central Valley Flood Protection Board, San Joaquin Area Flood Control Agency, Restore the Delta, River Partners, Little Manilla Rising and Public Health Advocates.

The symposium will be a one day virtual event and will take place on January 26th from 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM. We hope to see you there!

Register here!
Categories: G2. Local Greens

Description of casks for spent fuel storage

Indian Point Safe Energy Coalition - Sun, 01/08/2023 - 06:41

The German casks are thick-wall metal (ductile cast iron) over 19″ thick.  They don’t use or need concrete. 

The Fukushima thick-wall casks for storing spent nuclear fuel assemblies are 10″ thick metal (carbon steel and lead).  They survived the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Either system is better than what we have. Switzerland uses both types of thick-wall casks but requires the highest technical standards of these types from the manufacturers.  The Swiss are a great example of the best available technology standards for storing high level radioactive waste. They also have an on-site hot cell facility for inspecting and retrieving spent nuclear fuel rods. 

Swiss Solution
https://sanonofresafety.org/swiss/

Thin-wall stainless steel canisters are vulnerable to failure through undetectable microscopic cracks. No thin-wall canister has been evaluated for earthquake risks assuming there may be partial cracks. 

Thin-wall canisters do not stop gamma or neutrons. The thin-wall canisters are normally  stored in carbon steel lined concrete casks. The concrete casks have huge air vents for convection cooling. Thick-wall metal casks don’t have or need air vents. 

In the U.S. there are some thick wall metal casks (both ductile cast iron and the steel/iron casks). However, rather than spending money to store these thick-wall casks in hardened buildings, as is done in most of the world, they leave them out in the environment where seals and bolts can prematurely rust. 

Thin-wall canisters systems cannot be stored in buildings, since radionuclides are continuously being released through the air vents. 

Some of the oldest canisters at San Onofre have inlet air vents that measure over 2000 counts per minute. The NRC refuses to tell us why these readings are so high. The NRC also refuses to tell us what the outlet air vent readings are on these older canisters.  Instead, the NRC has eliminated the requirement to even measure radiation levels at the outlet air vents.

The oldest canisters at San Onofre have stainless steel clad rods so are less likely to explode when air enters canisters through cracks. 

Most fuel rods now have Zirconium cladding instead of stainless steel. Due to the longer burnup time of the fuel in reactors (both medium and high burnup), the structure of both the cladding and uranium fuel pellets changes from ductile (flexible) to brittle, making them more likely to fail during transport. Also, some of the  zirconium and uranium metal transforms into zirconium hydrides and uranium hydrides. This increases risks for hydrogen explosions when this material comes into contact with air.  For example, zirconium hydrides in gas or small particle form will explode when exposed to a relatively small amount of air. 

Cask venders will sell anything the U.S. wants. However, as long as the NRC has the authority to make exemptions to safety requirements, companies will never use the safest available technology. 

ASME N3 standards are American Standards for Mechanical Engineers specifically designed for pressure vessels storing and/or transporting highly radioactive fuel waste and other highly radioactive waste. 

Only thick-wall metal casks can meet these American standards. The NRC should not be allowed to give exemptions to these standards. 

Canisters and casks are pressurized with helium instead of air to minimize metal corrosion and to prevent hydrogen explosions. 

See oldest canisters/casks in this 2-page Inventory, sorted by state. 

https://sanonofresafety.files.wordpress.com/2018/07/d32-caskinventorybystate2018-07-14a.pdf

Cracking Canister Problems, Recommendations, and Nuclear Storage Myths Handout

https://sanonofresafety.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/urgentnuclearwastecanisterproblems2016-09-16.pdf

Donna

The post Description of casks for spent fuel storage appeared first on Indian Point Safe Energy Coalition.

Categories: G2. Local Greens

Description of casks for spent fuel storage

INDIAN POINT SAFE ENERGY COALITION (IPSEC) - Sun, 01/08/2023 - 06:41

The German casks are thick-wall metal (ductile cast iron) over 19″ thick.  They don’t use or need concrete. 

The Fukushima thick-wall casks for storing spent nuclear fuel assemblies are 10″ thick metal (carbon steel and lead).  They survived the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Either system is better than what we have. Switzerland uses both types of thick-wall casks but requires the highest technical standards of these types from the manufacturers.  The Swiss are a great example of the best available technology standards for storing high level radioactive waste. They also have an on-site hot cell facility for inspecting and retrieving spent nuclear fuel rods. 

Swiss Solution
https://sanonofresafety.org/swiss/

Thin-wall stainless steel canisters are vulnerable to failure through undetectable microscopic cracks. No thin-wall canister has been evaluated for earthquake risks assuming there may be partial cracks. 

Thin-wall canisters do not stop gamma or neutrons. The thin-wall canisters are normally  stored in carbon steel lined concrete casks. The concrete casks have huge air vents for convection cooling. Thick-wall metal casks don’t have or need air vents. 

In the U.S. there are some thick wall metal casks (both ductile cast iron and the steel/iron casks). However, rather than spending money to store these thick-wall casks in hardened buildings, as is done in most of the world, they leave them out in the environment where seals and bolts can prematurely rust. 

Thin-wall canisters systems cannot be stored in buildings, since radionuclides are continuously being released through the air vents. 

Some of the oldest canisters at San Onofre have inlet air vents that measure over 2000 counts per minute. The NRC refuses to tell us why these readings are so high. The NRC also refuses to tell us what the outlet air vent readings are on these older canisters.  Instead, the NRC has eliminated the requirement to even measure radiation levels at the outlet air vents.

The oldest canisters at San Onofre have stainless steel clad rods so are less likely to explode when air enters canisters through cracks. 

Most fuel rods now have Zirconium cladding instead of stainless steel. Due to the longer burnup time of the fuel in reactors (both medium and high burnup), the structure of both the cladding and uranium fuel pellets changes from ductile (flexible) to brittle, making them more likely to fail during transport. Also, some of the  zirconium and uranium metal transforms into zirconium hydrides and uranium hydrides. This increases risks for hydrogen explosions when this material comes into contact with air.  For example, zirconium hydrides in gas or small particle form will explode when exposed to a relatively small amount of air. 

Cask venders will sell anything the U.S. wants. However, as long as the NRC has the authority to make exemptions to safety requirements, companies will never use the safest available technology. 

ASME N3 standards are American Standards for Mechanical Engineers specifically designed for pressure vessels storing and/or transporting highly radioactive fuel waste and other highly radioactive waste. 

Only thick-wall metal casks can meet these American standards. The NRC should not be allowed to give exemptions to these standards. 

Canisters and casks are pressurized with helium instead of air to minimize metal corrosion and to prevent hydrogen explosions. 

See oldest canisters/casks in this 2-page Inventory, sorted by state. 

https://sanonofresafety.files.wordpress.com/2018/07/d32-caskinventorybystate2018-07-14a.pdf

Cracking Canister Problems, Recommendations, and Nuclear Storage Myths Handout

https://sanonofresafety.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/urgentnuclearwastecanisterproblems2016-09-16.pdf

Donna

The post Description of casks for spent fuel storage appeared first on Indian Point Safe Energy Coalition.

Categories: G2. Local Greens

Spring 2022 edition of The League Line now online

Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League - Sun, 01/08/2023 - 04:32
Our Spring 2022 newsletter is now online.
Categories: G2. Local Greens

BREDL comments on DOE's consent-based siting and federal interim storage

Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League - Sun, 01/08/2023 - 04:32
Mar. 07, 2022: Working in communities in the Southeast since 1984, we are well aware of radioactive waste initiatives going out to potential waste dump communities. The Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League was founded because of one such program, the DOE's Crystalline Repository Project and interim Monitored Retrievable Storage Site. We have continually opposed such radioactive waste dumps wherever they are proposed, including Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Likewise, we oppose so-called consolidated interim storage schemes.
Categories: G2. Local Greens

BREDL Welcomes Jason Torian as Community Organizer

Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League - Sun, 01/08/2023 - 04:32
Jason Torian has joined Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League as our newest community organizer. Jason will be working closely with our Chapel Hill chapter, as well as assisting various other chapters within BREDL's footprint.
Categories: G2. Local Greens

Contra Costa DA Should Prosecute Martinez Refinery for Flagrant Violation of Health and Safety

Sunflower Alliance - Sat, 01/07/2023 - 21:59

We strongly agree with the Contra Costa Health Department: the Martinez Refining Company should be held criminally liable for its toxic chemical release in Martinez on Thanksgiving night.

Please email District Attorney Diana Becton and her Environmental Enforcement Unit at DAOffice@contracostada.org.  Tell them you feel strongly that the PBF-owned Martinez Refining Company should be Read more

Categories: G2. Local Greens

January Calendar

Richmond Progressive Alliance - Sat, 01/07/2023 - 17:49

Here are upcoming RPA meetings and events. Note, most meetings are only open to RPA members, although allies and guests are often welcome. If you are interested in becoming a member, you may do so here. Dues may be waived if they are a barrier to you joining the RPA. If you have questions about joining the RPA, or are interested in attending a meeting as a non-member, please contact  info@richmondprogressivealliance.org

Categories: G2. Local Greens

Public Art?

Richmond Progressive Alliance - Sat, 01/07/2023 - 16:31

By BK Williams

Public art reflects a community’s values and history, and how we see the world – the artist’s response to our time and place combined with our own sense of who we are. It is placed in public sites, and is there for everyone, a form of collective community expression.

Richmond has had in effect a "Percent for Art" ordinance setting aside 1.5% of eligible capital improvement project budgets for the acquisition of public art. Additionally, there is a 1% fee for Public Art to private developers on applicable projects. Public artwork is directed through the Arts and Culture Commission which advises the city in its artistic and cultural development in preserving Richmond’s heritage. The city’s budget shows the Percent for Art has amassed in excess of 1 mill for this fiscal year. There was approximately $1.7 million dollars available as of 12/20/22. (A&C Ordinances, Policies, and Procedures.)

Categories: G2. Local Greens

Tribute to Kabir Kapur

Richmond Progressive Alliance - Sat, 01/07/2023 - 12:06

By Nicole Valentino and Diana Wear

Kabir Kapur left an indelible mark on our RPA community when he died at the young age of 30 years old. He died of complications following an asthma attack that progressed to cardiac arrest. We are deeply saddened by this loss. Yet while we are bereft with his death, we are also left with some wonderful memories and profound lessons.  Kabir was a longtime, active member of RPA. Over the years, he worked on a number of committees and action teams including the leadership body of the RPA, the Steering Committee, as well as Membership and Council Action Team. He also participated actively with the Communications Team meetings urging coverage of relevant issues.

Categories: G2. Local Greens

Kabir

Richmond Progressive Alliance - Sat, 01/07/2023 - 12:02

This playlist tribute to Kabir Kapur is a compilation of songs submitted by Kabir’s fellow RPA music lovers. Listen on Spotify, or as individual YouTube links:

Peace Train by artists from around the world featuring Yusuf / Cat Stevens. Submitted by Emily Ross. “Kabir and I shared a love for Cat Stevens, and he would sometimes send me renditions I may not have heard, such as this one.” Note: Spotify playlist includes alternate version (original).

Mississippi Goddamn by Nina Simone. Submitted by Jamin Pursell. “Kabir and I really enjoyed listening to classic protest music and Nina Simone was able to really articulate the frustration of Americans who are tired of the racism. Also, it’s the frustration with the constant regressivism that we have in America.”

Fuk Da Police by NWA. Submitted by Jamin Pursell. “Kabir had too often seen the brutality brought upon people voicing their opposition to exploitation and violence with brutality by police.  He understood the great frustration within communities that have to prove their humanity to those in power in order to be treated fairly.”

Categories: G2. Local Greens

RPA Committee Work and Action Team Report

Richmond Progressive Alliance - Sat, 01/07/2023 - 11:03

By Diana Wear and Chris Broglio 

This month, the Membership Committee Co-chairs, collaborated with the Office Staff to address a number of needs we’ve been wrestling with in our post-election period as well as since the pandemic and acquiring our new office space at 12929 San Pablo Avenue.  We’ve devised plans to provide orientations for new members, ways for our community to have round table discussions and offer continuing education for RPA members.

Categories: G2. Local Greens

Episode for January 6, 2023

Allegheny Front - Fri, 01/06/2023 - 13:48

Environmental groups say they found high levels of benzene in the air in the Mon Valley near Pittsburgh and want federal regulators to step in. Also, natural history museum specimens like mice stuffed with cotton and preserved for decades give researchers important information about the environment. But these collections are at risk. Plus, the US Postal Service reverses course and commits to converting its fleet of vehicles to electric. 

The post Episode for January 6, 2023 appeared first on The Allegheny Front.

Categories: G2. Local Greens

Virginia Mercury Op-ed: Game over for the Mountain Valley Pipeline

CCAN - Fri, 01/06/2023 - 13:17

The Mountain Valley Pipeline (MVP) is 0-4 on first down conversions. The red zone is nowhere in sight, and the clock is running out. Why are people still betting on this team?

MVP is a monstrous, 303-mile fracked-gas pipeline planned to run through the Blue Ridge and Appalachian regions of Virginia and West Virginia, all the way to North Carolina. It would boost the bottom line of fossil fuel companies at the expense of regional clean water and endangered species. It would require up to four new compressor stations, facilities that keep the gas pressurized as it travels. The pipeline would also cut through about five miles of the Jefferson National Forest and bisect the iconic Appalachian Trail and Blue Ridge Parkway.

MVP was thrust into the national spotlight in August, when Sen. Joe Manchin, D-West Virginia, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-New York, and then-House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-California, made a closed-door agreement to advance Manchin’s priorities in exchange for a vote on the Inflation Reduction Act. Not only would this dirty deal greenlight MVP, the carbon equivalent of 26 new coal plants, it would also limit judicial oversight and gut bedrock federal environmental law. Before Manchin’s proposed legislation even hit the floor in September, he was forced to pull the language. He simply didn’t have the votes, so his first legislative pass was incomplete.

Manchin returned this December for another try – this time targeting the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). However, House and Senate progressives continued their vocal opposition and, again, the language was stripped before it hit the floor for a vote.

Next, Schumer agreed to tack on a version of Manchin’s demands as an amendment to the NDAA. When brought to a vote in the Senate, Manchin still came up short. He made one final Hail Mary attempt, as he tried to push the MVP into another must-pass budget bill right before Christmas. That too failed, and 2022 closed with no gain for the MVP.

A fossil-fuel fan might say that MVP is due for a comeback. But history has shown that the Mountain Valley Pipeline cannot make good on its promises. Since construction began, MVP has racked up 300-plus violations of existing permits across West Virginia and Virginia. These violations have had devastating impacts on local ecosystems and people who live along the route. The company continues to peddle to its investors the false narrative that MVP is almost finished, while outside reports show the project is barely over halfway complete. Which part of the construction still needs to happen? The steepest and most treacherous terrain.

Construction, however, is off the table completely for at least another year. Why? Because seven years after construction began, MVP still lacks critical permits. MVP is still in court for violations of the Endangered Species Act and a challenge to a certificate of need from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, issued back in 2020. The company is on a third rewrite of a permit to cross the Jefferson National Forest after prior versions violated federal forest management standards. The Forest Service anticipates a final permit this summer, but MVP will likely face legal challenges to this permit (if it is granted) and the company would have to finish all construction to ensure its promised 2023 operation date.

If this was the NFL, the fantasy leagues would be hedging their bets. Somehow NextEra Energy and other Wall Street gamblers keep putting their money on a failing team, a failing project and failing legislative attempts. When investors originally bought in, they didn’t expect the continually rising cost. MVP is now billions of dollars over budget, currently topping $6 billion – and the price continues to balloon with permit rewrites and lawyer fees. Given that renewable energy sources are far less expensive, why are lawmakers and utilities trying to resuscitate a dying industry?

To be fair, this MVP team is number one in something: cost per mile. It’s the most expensive pipeline project ever!

With every failed congressional endeavor, the stock of Equitrans Midstream Corporation (ETRN), MVP’s parent company, takes a dip – ranging from 3 to 8%. ETRN and Roanoke Gas have recorded several multimillion dollar impairment charges over the last year alone, but the bettor’s sunk-cost fallacy wins against reason. In its earnings calls this past quarter, ETRN outlined the “hostility” of the courts and the company’s reliance on congressional intervention to complete the project. With sine die in sight, the legislative pathway is closing. MVP now has to stand on its own merits.

The Mountain Valley Pipeline is down $6 billion with seconds on the clock in overtime. Even casual viewers can see that the game is over. MVP has lost. Gamblers should cut their losses while they still can.

Elle De La Cancela serves as the Central Virginia Campaign Coordinator for the Chesapeake Climate Action Network and leads the organization’s No New Fossil Fuels work. Previously, she worked on an election and for two federal land agencies: the National Park Service and the National Forest Service.

By Elle De La Cancela

Initially published at Virginia Mercury

The post Virginia Mercury Op-ed: Game over for the Mountain Valley Pipeline appeared first on Chesapeake Climate Action Network.

Categories: G2. Local Greens

Richmond Times-Dispatch Letter to the Editor: Virginia is ready for electric vehicle standards

CCAN - Fri, 01/06/2023 - 13:16

Initially published at the Richmond Times-Dispatch

The 2023 General Assembly session is around the corner, and the partisan fearmongering has unfortunately already begun. Republicans pre-filed seven bills to repeal clean car standards, as called for by Del. Kathy Byron in her recent column [“Virginia must reverse course on clean cars law”].

Let’s be clear. For combating climate change and preserving our beautiful commonwealth, vehicle emissions are our biggest challenge. To meet this challenge, we need to phase in electric vehicles and expand access to public transportation.

Virginia has not yet adopted our stricter emission standards, which call for a percentage of new vehicles sold in the state to be electric, but we are already well on our way to abiding by them. In the first half of 2022, 7% of new vehicles sold in the commonwealth were electric. Next year, when our participation begins, the target number is 8%. Virginians are ready – we just need to maintain our current policy so that manufacturers send us EVs, which are heavily prioritized for states with stricter standards.

We have $106 million in state funds heading out the door to set up charging stations along major highway corridors. There are massive federal incentives for personal charging infrastructure, and plenty more that the state could and should pursue to continue to build out our highway charging system.

Let’s not give into scare tactics. Virginia is ready for EVs, and we need them to take on climate change and improve air quality. Now is not the time to throw in the towel.

-Victoria Higgins, Richmond

The post Richmond Times-Dispatch Letter to the Editor: Virginia is ready for electric vehicle standards appeared first on Chesapeake Climate Action Network.

Categories: G2. Local Greens

Essay: Northern cardinals cheer up winter

Allegheny Front - Fri, 01/06/2023 - 12:59

Learn more about this colorful backyard bird, like how brighter males have better territories and tend to their young more.

The post Essay: Northern cardinals cheer up winter appeared first on The Allegheny Front.

Categories: G2. Local Greens

Lancaster nonprofit launches local carbon credit program

Allegheny Front - Fri, 01/06/2023 - 12:37

It aims to give people and businesses a way to take responsibility for their greenhouse gas emissions while helping their neighbors.

The post Lancaster nonprofit launches local carbon credit program appeared first on The Allegheny Front.

Categories: G2. Local Greens

Pages

The Fine Print I:

Disclaimer: The views expressed on this site are not the official position of the IWW (or even the IWW’s EUC) unless otherwise indicated and do not necessarily represent the views of anyone but the author’s, nor should it be assumed that any of these authors automatically support the IWW or endorse any of its positions.

Further: the inclusion of a link on our site (other than the link to the main IWW site) does not imply endorsement by or an alliance with the IWW. These sites have been chosen by our members due to their perceived relevance to the IWW EUC and are included here for informational purposes only. If you have any suggestions or comments on any of the links included (or not included) above, please contact us.

The Fine Print II:

Fair Use Notice: The material on this site is provided for educational and informational purposes. It may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. It is being made available in an effort to advance the understanding of scientific, environmental, economic, social justice and human rights issues etc.

It is believed that this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have an interest in using the included information for research and educational purposes. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner. The information on this site does not constitute legal or technical advice.