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G2. Local Greens

OPG pushing radioactive waste toward the edge of Lake Ontario instead of away

Ontario Clean Air Alliance - Tue, 01/03/2023 - 10:32

Once again, Ontario Power Generation (OPG) is failing to put safety first when it comes to nuclear waste storage at its Darlington Nuclear Station. The International Joint Commission’s (IJC) Great Lakes Water Quality Board has called for nuclear facilities to pull nuclear wastes away from the shores of the Great Lakes to prevent the

The post OPG pushing radioactive waste toward the edge of Lake Ontario instead of away appeared first on Ontario Clean Air Alliance.

Categories: G2. Local Greens

New year, even worse water woes in Arizona

Western Priorities - Tue, 01/03/2023 - 09:35

Arizona’s cities and suburbs are among the fastest growing in the nation despite water scarcity concerns due to ongoing severe drought and climate change. However, federal officials may finally put the brakes on unrestrained development and chronic overuse of water, starting with forcing Arizona to use 21 percent less water from the Colorado River this year.

Even with steep cuts to Arizona’s access to Colorado River water, some developers think they can outrun the water crisis by relying solely on pumping groundwater from underground aquifers, but water experts disagree. Kathleen Farris, a researcher at Arizona State University’s Kyl Center for Water Policy is convinced that growth is surpassing the water limits in parts of Arizona. She worries that the development boom is on a collision course with the aridification of the Southwest and the finite supply of groundwater that can be pumped from desert aquifers. “This is the epitome of irresponsible growth. It is growing on desert lands, raw desert lands, where there’s no other water supply except groundwater,” said Ferris.

To add to an already anxiety-producing water reality, much of Arizona’s precious groundwater is being used by private companies for a paltry fee, including Saudi Arabia’s largest dairy company, Almarai. The company, through a subsidiary, has been buying and leasing land across western Arizona since 2014, drawing unlimited amounts of water to grow an alfalfa crop that feeds dairy cows 8,000 miles away. A 1980 state law that regulates groundwater use in a handful of urban areas is outdated and legally insufficient to deal with a largely unregulated groundwater pumping reality.

Desperate to ease water worries in Arizona, state officials are contemplating a costly proposal to build a plant to desalinate ocean water in Mexico and pump it 200 miles across the border and through Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, an international biosphere reserve. Jennifer Martin with the Sierra Club told the water finance board in a statement that Arizona should be focused on conserving water, moving away from water-intensive crops such as alfalfa, and reining in rapid growth, rather than shifting the environmental burden onto Mexico and future generations.

Quick hits Utah’s scourge of unplugged oil wells

Salt Lake Tribune

How the West’s public lands fared in 2022

High Country News

New year, even worse water woes in Arizona

Los Angeles Times | Washington Post | High Country News | New York Times [opinion]

Colorado wildfires are growing more unpredictable and officials are ignoring the warnings

ProPublica

Seven legal cases that reshaped environmental law in 2022

E&E News

Alaska Native corporation sets aside land for conservation in barrier to Pebble mine

Anchorage Daily News

Washington state begins construction on new wildlife crossings

King5 News

Ten national parks to visit in winter

The Travel

Quote of the day

That’s what people don’t realize, is they think of those charismatic animals like bears and cougars and elk and deer and now moose, but they don’t think about all the other species out there. We have at least 52 mammal species we’re trying to connect, and then there’s a bunch of amphibians, reptiles. Basically there are more than 100 species that are just vertebrate species we’re trying to connect. It’s not just a small number of species; it’s a lot.”

Patty Garvey-Darda, wildlife biologist with the U.S. Forest Service Picture this @USFWS

It’s self-reflection season again. Time to look back on the past year and wonder if you made good choices. We hope you have no egrets. Happy New Year!

(featured image: Central Arizona Project irrigation canal in Arizona. Credit: Skaidra Smith-Heisters, flickr)

The post New year, even worse water woes in Arizona appeared first on Center for Western Priorities.

Categories: G2. Local Greens

Brian Lehrer of WNYC Endorses Nuclear Power

Indian Point Safe Energy Coalition - Tue, 01/03/2023 - 06:36
Today on a segment of his show about CLCPA Brian said that nuclear power is clean because it emits no green house gases.  He said it was safe because there have only been two accidents, one in Russia.  The program is already posted and you can listen to it now on WNYC.

This requires a major response. It has been clear for some time that Brian has avoided discussing nuclear topics – even when Indian Point’s last reactor closed.

When I checked the website for an address to send a reply, I found an email for the Community Advisory Board.  

I suggest that we all send individual letters to the CAB and make a big deal out of this. 

His average weekly audience is 969,300. We must respond and demand equal airtime.

I am writing my letter now and suggest that letters to Brian be posted to this thread as they are written. The language may be helpful to others.  

Don’t wait, do it now!

Some ideas; pick one or something different and write a short letter.  Don’t worry about making it perfect.  This is the time for an outraged reader response.

Express shock and dismay at Brian’s naive viewpoint.  

Stress the waste issue and costs of decommissioning. 

How expensive nuclear power is compared to the per kwh cost of renewables.

Talk about the number of nuclear accidents world wide.

Mention experts and use some quotes and  links.  Doubtful if they will accept attachments.

Send an invitation to our forthcoming forums so Brian can get educated.

Contamination of the Hudson River and the fact it is a source of drinking water for 7 communities.

Or something entirely different. 

Post ideas or letters to this thread.  We are not looking for outstanding quality.  We need quantity NOW.

Marilyn

Community Advisory Board

NYPR’s Community Advisory Board (CAB) is a volunteer group of interested listeners who meet monthly to gather public comments and advise the station as to whether the programming and policies of the station meet the specialized educational and cultural needs of the community. 

You can email your feedback to the CAB at cab@wnyc.org

Here’s the letter I sent to WNYC today:

Dear Citizen Advisory Board for WNYC,

On Brian Lehrer’s show for 2023, January 3, he offended a lot of your listeners, and I surely would have been one of them.  He is very much in need of education about nuclear power.

First, he thinks it is clean because it emits no greenhouse gasses (GHG).  But mining, milling, processing, enrichment and fabrication of uranium fuel are all GHG intensive.

I.  About mining: UNDERGROUND mining of uranium requires a lot of GHG to (1) prospect, (2) drill and excavate, (3) prop up the walls of the mine, (4) fashion and install elevators, and (5) bring in rail to get the ore out.  OPEN-PIT mining burns GHG for 1, 2, and 5 above.  LEACHATE mining puts compounds in the ground to dissolve uranium ore (extreme acid or basic compounds), which chemically pollute and contaminate with radioactive isotopes the soil and groundwater. Then the ore is transported (in vehicles that burn fossil fuels) for . . .

II. MILLING:  Milling uranium ore is GHG intensive.  A lot of fossil-fuel power is needed to crush the ore, then the chemicals take over to extract the uranium part and bake it into “yellow cake” or UOX.  This is a highly radioactive stuff that must be specially packaged (to manufacture packages requires GHG at the factory) for transport (in vehicles that burn fossil fuels) to the one and only processing plant in the USA at Paducah, Kentucky.

III. PROCESSING:  To make yellowcake useful requires that the UOX be turned into a gaseous substance.  Now here’s a really filthy process: the processing plant uses HF, fluoric acid.  Maybe you remember from HS chemistry what a dangerous substance HF is.  But tons of it are used in Paducah to create UF6, not just because it’s a gas, but because every UF6 molecules has EXACTLY THE SAME MASS every other UF6 molecule except for one little thing.  99.3% of the molecules contain U with a mass of 238 and 0.7% have U with a mass of 235.  This presents a possibility for physical separation, and the necessity for same.  238U does not split and release energy when hit with a neutron, but 235U does.  So you can’t get heat to boil water (or explosive bombs to kill people) from 238U atoms.  You need to 235U at 5% for NPPs (and 90% for bombs).  So once again the radioactive UF6 is packed up and sent to another venue for . . .

IV.  ENRICHMENT:  The largest buildings in the world were devoted to this process during the Cold War, and these buildings are huge today.  They contain tens of thousands of gas centrifuge tubes for spinning out the 235UF6 from the 238UF6.  The difference in mass of these two gasses is about 1%.  It takes tens of thousands of centrifuge tubes to do this, each manufactured using GHG at the factory.  Then, this stuff is liquified for transport (GHG again) to . . .

V.  FABRICATION:  Don’t know where, don’t know how, but the 5% 235U, 95% 238U ends up as tiny pellets the size of the last joint of your child’s little finger for packing into 10 ft. Tubes made of Zirconium alloy (nickel and some other metals) which are assembled into bundles suitable for a nuclear reactor vessel.  

Oh, wait . . . What about all those buildings where these processes take place. Materials, transportation, etc.  All using GHG.

So we get to the place where lots of filthy, anti-biological isotopes are released into the air, soil and water, but very little CO2.  However, the CO2 that is released contains Carbon 14, a radioactive isotope that replaces the non-radioactive C in nature’s “carbon-unit” organisms (that’s you, me, elephants, whales, octopi, trees, flowers, butterflies, viruses, etc.).

Now let’s jump to the carbon footprint after the fuel is spent (SF) and it is removed from the reactor for storage, or disposal, or whatever happened to it.  Like PFAs it never goes away, but unlike PFAs it last 100,000 years instead of 300 years.

This letter is way too long, so I’m just going to send a picture of an ISFSI (independent spent fuel storage installation) and ask you —¿What do YOU think is the carbon footprint of these concrete casks? 

Sorry this letter is so long, but I get carried away by the ignorance of people who implement main-stream media.  That nuclear power is clean — ¡what clap-trap!  

And one visit to wikipedia shows that there are 5 major accidents, not just 2.  READ ONE MORE BOOK FOR GOODNESS SAKE.  Make it Atoms and Ashes: a global history of nuclear disasters by Serhii Plokhy.  He has a chapter for Castle Bravo, Kyshtym (Google it — EASY for Neil Lehrer; and IT’S HIS JOB), Windscale, Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and Fukushima.

If the news readers on WNYC haven’t read the books of Kate Brown, MIT prof., then they will surely make a ton of mistakes and pass them on to their listeners.  Also for quick education go to beyondnuclear.orgnirs.org, and NEIS.org

Sincerely, Jan Boudart, 1132 W Lunt Ave, Chicago IL 60626, board member Nuclear Energy Information Service, NEIS.org, 415.301.1129.

The post Brian Lehrer of WNYC Endorses Nuclear Power appeared first on Indian Point Safe Energy Coalition.

Categories: G2. Local Greens

Brian Lehrer of WNYC Endorses Nuclear Power

INDIAN POINT SAFE ENERGY COALITION (IPSEC) - Tue, 01/03/2023 - 06:36
Today on a segment of his show about CLCPA Brian said that nuclear power is clean because it emits no green house gases.  He said it was safe because there have only been two accidents, one in Russia.  The program is already posted and you can listen to it now on WNYC.

This requires a major response. It has been clear for some time that Brian has avoided discussing nuclear topics – even when Indian Point’s last reactor closed.

When I checked the website for an address to send a reply, I found an email for the Community Advisory Board.  

I suggest that we all send individual letters to the CAB and make a big deal out of this. 

His average weekly audience is 969,300. We must respond and demand equal airtime.

I am writing my letter now and suggest that letters to Brian be posted to this thread as they are written. The language may be helpful to others.  

Don’t wait, do it now!

Some ideas; pick one or something different and write a short letter.  Don’t worry about making it perfect.  This is the time for an outraged reader response.

Express shock and dismay at Brian’s naive viewpoint.  

Stress the waste issue and costs of decommissioning. 

How expensive nuclear power is compared to the per kwh cost of renewables.

Talk about the number of nuclear accidents world wide.

Mention experts and use some quotes and  links.  Doubtful if they will accept attachments.

Send an invitation to our forthcoming forums so Brian can get educated.

Contamination of the Hudson River and the fact it is a source of drinking water for 7 communities.

Or something entirely different. 

Post ideas or letters to this thread.  We are not looking for outstanding quality.  We need quantity NOW.

Marilyn

Community Advisory Board

NYPR’s Community Advisory Board (CAB) is a volunteer group of interested listeners who meet monthly to gather public comments and advise the station as to whether the programming and policies of the station meet the specialized educational and cultural needs of the community. 

You can email your feedback to the CAB at cab@wnyc.org

Here’s the letter I sent to WNYC today:

Dear Citizen Advisory Board for WNYC,

On Brian Lehrer’s show for 2023, January 3, he offended a lot of your listeners, and I surely would have been one of them.  He is very much in need of education about nuclear power.

First, he thinks it is clean because it emits no greenhouse gasses (GHG).  But mining, milling, processing, enrichment and fabrication of uranium fuel are all GHG intensive.

I.  About mining: UNDERGROUND mining of uranium requires a lot of GHG to (1) prospect, (2) drill and excavate, (3) prop up the walls of the mine, (4) fashion and install elevators, and (5) bring in rail to get the ore out.  OPEN-PIT mining burns GHG for 1, 2, and 5 above.  LEACHATE mining puts compounds in the ground to dissolve uranium ore (extreme acid or basic compounds), which chemically pollute and contaminate with radioactive isotopes the soil and groundwater. Then the ore is transported (in vehicles that burn fossil fuels) for . . .

II. MILLING:  Milling uranium ore is GHG intensive.  A lot of fossil-fuel power is needed to crush the ore, then the chemicals take over to extract the uranium part and bake it into “yellow cake” or UOX.  This is a highly radioactive stuff that must be specially packaged (to manufacture packages requires GHG at the factory) for transport (in vehicles that burn fossil fuels) to the one and only processing plant in the USA at Paducah, Kentucky.

III. PROCESSING:  To make yellowcake useful requires that the UOX be turned into a gaseous substance.  Now here’s a really filthy process: the processing plant uses HF, fluoric acid.  Maybe you remember from HS chemistry what a dangerous substance HF is.  But tons of it are used in Paducah to create UF6, not just because it’s a gas, but because every UF6 molecules has EXACTLY THE SAME MASS every other UF6 molecule except for one little thing.  99.3% of the molecules contain U with a mass of 238 and 0.7% have U with a mass of 235.  This presents a possibility for physical separation, and the necessity for same.  238U does not split and release energy when hit with a neutron, but 235U does.  So you can’t get heat to boil water (or explosive bombs to kill people) from 238U atoms.  You need to 235U at 5% for NPPs (and 90% for bombs).  So once again the radioactive UF6 is packed up and sent to another venue for . . .

IV.  ENRICHMENT:  The largest buildings in the world were devoted to this process during the Cold War, and these buildings are huge today.  They contain tens of thousands of gas centrifuge tubes for spinning out the 235UF6 from the 238UF6.  The difference in mass of these two gasses is about 1%.  It takes tens of thousands of centrifuge tubes to do this, each manufactured using GHG at the factory.  Then, this stuff is liquified for transport (GHG again) to . . .

V.  FABRICATION:  Don’t know where, don’t know how, but the 5% 235U, 95% 238U ends up as tiny pellets the size of the last joint of your child’s little finger for packing into 10 ft. Tubes made of Zirconium alloy (nickel and some other metals) which are assembled into bundles suitable for a nuclear reactor vessel.  

Oh, wait . . . What about all those buildings where these processes take place. Materials, transportation, etc.  All using GHG.

So we get to the place where lots of filthy, anti-biological isotopes are released into the air, soil and water, but very little CO2.  However, the CO2 that is released contains Carbon 14, a radioactive isotope that replaces the non-radioactive C in nature’s “carbon-unit” organisms (that’s you, me, elephants, whales, octopi, trees, flowers, butterflies, viruses, etc.).

Now let’s jump to the carbon footprint after the fuel is spent (SF) and it is removed from the reactor for storage, or disposal, or whatever happened to it.  Like PFAs it never goes away, but unlike PFAs it last 100,000 years instead of 300 years.

This letter is way too long, so I’m just going to send a picture of an ISFSI (independent spent fuel storage installation) and ask you —¿What do YOU think is the carbon footprint of these concrete casks? 

Sorry this letter is so long, but I get carried away by the ignorance of people who implement main-stream media.  That nuclear power is clean — ¡what clap-trap!  

And one visit to wikipedia shows that there are 5 major accidents, not just 2.  READ ONE MORE BOOK FOR GOODNESS SAKE.  Make it Atoms and Ashes: a global history of nuclear disasters by Serhii Plokhy.  He has a chapter for Castle Bravo, Kyshtym (Google it — EASY for Neil Lehrer; and IT’S HIS JOB), Windscale, Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and Fukushima.

If the news readers on WNYC haven’t read the books of Kate Brown, MIT prof., then they will surely make a ton of mistakes and pass them on to their listeners.  Also for quick education go to beyondnuclear.orgnirs.org, and NEIS.org

Sincerely, Jan Boudart, 1132 W Lunt Ave, Chicago IL 60626, board member Nuclear Energy Information Service, NEIS.org, 415.301.1129.

The post Brian Lehrer of WNYC Endorses Nuclear Power appeared first on Indian Point Safe Energy Coalition.

Categories: G2. Local Greens

Auld Biden Syne in front of Biden’s house midnight Dec. 31

Indian Point Safe Energy Coalition - Tue, 01/03/2023 - 06:22

Here’s a video of a rain-soaked, straggly but passionate group of 8 climate justice activists, and a dog, singing directly in front of Joe Biden’s house in Wilmington, De. as 2022 turned into 2023. We begin singing at the 4 minute mark. And below are the words we sang, to the tune of Auld Lang Syne.

https://t.co/PTUKkNHgcH

— BeyondExtremeEnergy (@BXEAction) January 1, 2023

Auld Biden Syne

Should old acquaintance with fossil fuels be finally put to an end,
And renewables accelerate, a green new deal amen.
A green new deal,
A green new deal,
Is what the country needs,
And here we are at Biden’s house,
Saying: climate emergency, lead.

Will Biden pledge to change our course
And serve all human kind
No fossil fuels, no klepto rule
Joe Biden, now’s the time
The time is here, for this new year
Emergency declare
The stewards of this earth come forth, so we leave a world to share

The time has sadly passed us by
To avert a major loss
But we cannot lie soundly by
As we see a rising cost
Our brethren facing droughts and floods
Our forests burned to dust
But every life that we can save
Confronts us as a must

For auld lang syne, my friends
For auld lang syne
We’ll breathe a draught of fresher air
If Biden heeds the science
We’ll breathe a draught of fresher air
Extinction be postponed
But Joe must first his conscience search
And strike a righteous tone

When all the science goes for naught and  politicians jeer,
We stand up for our grandchildren and call for Joe to hear.
We call for Joe to hear us now
Demand for Joe to hear
Declare an end to fossil fuels
For life in future years.

The post Auld Biden Syne in front of Biden’s house midnight Dec. 31 appeared first on Indian Point Safe Energy Coalition.

Categories: G2. Local Greens

Auld Biden Syne in front of Biden’s house midnight Dec. 31

INDIAN POINT SAFE ENERGY COALITION (IPSEC) - Tue, 01/03/2023 - 06:22

Here’s a video of a rain-soaked, straggly but passionate group of 8 climate justice activists, and a dog, singing directly in front of Joe Biden’s house in Wilmington, De. as 2022 turned into 2023. We begin singing at the 4 minute mark. And below are the words we sang, to the tune of Auld Lang Syne.

https://t.co/PTUKkNHgcH

— BeyondExtremeEnergy (@BXEAction) January 1, 2023

Auld Biden Syne

Should old acquaintance with fossil fuels be finally put to an end,
And renewables accelerate, a green new deal amen.
A green new deal,
A green new deal,
Is what the country needs,
And here we are at Biden’s house,
Saying: climate emergency, lead.

Will Biden pledge to change our course
And serve all human kind
No fossil fuels, no klepto rule
Joe Biden, now’s the time
The time is here, for this new year
Emergency declare
The stewards of this earth come forth, so we leave a world to share

The time has sadly passed us by
To avert a major loss
But we cannot lie soundly by
As we see a rising cost
Our brethren facing droughts and floods
Our forests burned to dust
But every life that we can save
Confronts us as a must

For auld lang syne, my friends
For auld lang syne
We’ll breathe a draught of fresher air
If Biden heeds the science
We’ll breathe a draught of fresher air
Extinction be postponed
But Joe must first his conscience search
And strike a righteous tone

When all the science goes for naught and  politicians jeer,
We stand up for our grandchildren and call for Joe to hear.
We call for Joe to hear us now
Demand for Joe to hear
Declare an end to fossil fuels
For life in future years.

The post Auld Biden Syne in front of Biden’s house midnight Dec. 31 appeared first on Indian Point Safe Energy Coalition.

Categories: G2. Local Greens

Saltfleetby gas – quarterly volume of 5.6m therms

DRILL OR DROP? - Tue, 01/03/2023 - 02:48

Angus Energy has reported that its Saltfleetby gas site in Lincolnshire produced 5.6m therms between October and December 2022.

Saltfleetby gas site Image: Google Earth Imagery (c)2019 Infoterra Ltd & Bluesky, Imagery (c)2019 CNES/Airbus, Getmapping plc, Infoterra Ltd & Bluesky, Maxar Technologies, Map data (c)2019

The company said this was above what had been predicted in January 2020.

Average daily flow rates were 5.5 mmscfd (million standard cubic feet per day), Angus Energy said. Rates were highest in November at 6.0 mmscfd but lower in December because of scheduled and cold-weather shutdowns.

Peak daily flow rates from the two producing wells, A4 and B2, were about 6.4 mmscfd throughout the final quarter of 2022, the company said.

Gas condensate averaged 120 barrels/day, which was higher than expected. Water production, all from the A4 well, at 20 barrels/day, was lower than expected.

Sidetrack

Angus Energy said drilling on the final section of the SF-07 sidetrack was due to resume on Thursday 5 January. Well testing was expected in the second half of the month, the company said.

If successful, the well was expected to use most, if not all, of the additional process capacity from the site’s second compressor. The compressor, now on site, is expected to increase processing capacity to close to 12.8 mmscfd, Angus said.

Categories: G2. Local Greens

Latest onshore oil production – October 2022

DRILL OR DROP? - Tue, 01/03/2023 - 02:45

DrillOrDrop’s review of the latest UK onshore oil data for October 2022: the monthly volume of flared gas was the highest reported since records began six years ago

Key figures

Daily production: barrels per day (bopd): 14,190

Weight: 57659 tonnes

Volume: 69,933m3

Volume of onshore as a proportion of UK total oil production: 1.9%

Volume of flared gas at UK onshore oilfields: 1,308 ksm3

Volume of vented gas at UK onshore oilfields: 115 ksm3

The data in this post was compiled and published by the North Sea Transition Authority (NSTA) from reports by oil companies. This is published about three months in arrears. All the charts are based on the NSTA data.

Details Daily production
  • October 2022 saw the second consecutive monthly fall in daily production
  • But October 2022 recorded the fourth highest daily figure in the previous year
  • It was also up slightly on the same time a year earlier (14,190 bopd, compared with 14,064 bopd in October 2021)

Volume and weight
  • October 2022 was up on both measures on the previous (shorter) month
  • Volume and weight were also higher in October 2022 than the same time a year before
  • But they were lower than both August 2022 and December 2021
Contribution to UK oil production volume
  • October 2022 saw the onshore contribution to UK total oil production fall below 2%, despite the new contribution of the Wressle field in North Lincolnshire
  • This followed two months when the onshore contribution was comfortably above 2%
Flaring and venting
  • The volume of flared gas, at 1,308 ksm3, was the highest level reported since records began in October 2016
  • October 2022’s volume of flared gas was up 63% on September 2022 (801 ksm3)
  • This was largely a result of increased flaring at the IGas site at Singleton in West Sussex
  • Vented gas rose by 5%, up from 110 ksm3 to 115 ksm3
Top 20 fields
  • The top six oil fields onshore in the UK maintained their places compared with September 2022
  • In the top 10, all but Wytch Farm and Scampton North increased their monthly production (in tonnes)
  • Other fields which reported falling production in October 2022, compared with September 2022, included Cold Hanworth, Horse Hill, Palmers Wood and Storrington
  • Production resumed at Keddington, up at 127 tonnes in October 2022
  • Brockham appeared to half production in October after four months of records between June and September 2022
Wressle
  • The newest production field in the UK onshore reported stable production between August and October 2022
  • The site retained its second position in the top 20 rankings and stayed above 5% of UK onshore oil production
  • Daily production, volume and weight at Wressle were all highest in the first formal month of production (July 2022)
Wytch Farm
  • The UK’s biggest onshore oil producer dropped two percentage points in its contribution to total onshore production (79.42% in September to 77.43% in October 2022)
  • The weight of oil produced at the field fell slightly (0.14%) from 44,706 tonnes in September to 44,642 in October 2022
  • Daily oil production was down 3.36%, from 11,451 bopd in September to 11,066 bopd in October 2022
Singleton
  • This IGas site in West Sussex saw a 71% increase in the volume of flared gas in October, compared with September 2022
  • The volume of oil produced at the site rose 23% between the two months
Horse Hill
  • All measures of oil production at the UKOG site at Horse Hill in Surrey fell in October, compared with September 2022
  • Daily production was down from 55 bopd to 48 bopd. Oil volume fell to 237m3 (from 266m3) and weight was down from 225 tonnes in September to 200.5 tonnes in October
  • The volume of water produced at the site was down from 185m3 in September to 135m3 in October 2022
Whisby

The BritNRG site at Whisby in Lincolnshire reported at 75% increase in production, up from 262m3 in September to 460m3 in October. Daily production was up from 54.9bopd to 93.3bopd.

Increased oil production was also accompanied by a large rise in produced water, up from 262m3 in September to 1,427m3 in October.

Non-producers

There was no production at 12 UK onshore fields.

Egdon Resources’ Keddington site in Lincolnshire left this list, while Angus Energy’s Brockham site in Surrey rejoined:

  • Angus Energy: Lidsey and Brockham
  • Britnrg Limited: Newton-on-Trent
  • Egdon Resources: Dukes Wood, Fiskerton Airfield, Kirklington, Waddock Cross
  • IGas: Avington, Egmanton, Nettleham, Scampton, South Leverton
Operators

IGas plc increased its total monthly production by nearly 13% in October 2022. It was back above 7,000 tonnes after a fall to 6,565 tonnes in September. The company’s contribution to UK onshore oil production rose to 12.84%, up from 11.66% in September 2022.

Egdon Resources held its third place in the operators’ table for onshore oil. It reported total weight of oil up to 3,053 tonnes, from the Wressle and Keddington sites. The company increased its contribution to UK onshore oil to 5.29%, up from 5.02% in September 2022.

Perenco increased its total production to 45,309 tonnes, up from 45,179 tonnes in September. But the company’s share of UK onshore production fell in October to below 80%. 98.5% of the oil produced by Perenco comes from Wytch Farm.

Britnrg Limited reported a 75% increase of oil produced in October, compared with the month before This followed the rise in production at the company’s Whisby site.

UK Oil & Gas plc fell from fifth place in the operators’ table in September to sixth in October. The company’s contribution to UK onshore oil dropped to 0.35% with falling production from Horse Hill.

Europa Oil and Gas oil production fell 15% in October 2022, compared with September, down to 142 tonnes.

Angus Energy left the operators’ table in October, with no reported production from Brockham.

2022 onshore oil data archive

September 2022

August 2022 – see note about revised data

July 2022 – see note about revised data

June 2022

May 2022

April 2022

March 2022

February 2022

January 2022

Categories: G2. Local Greens

Guerneville Logging Plan Approved

Wine And Water Watch - Mon, 01/02/2023 - 16:11
View in Browser Guerneville Forest Coalition Logging Plan Approved – Please HELP! Guerneville Trees in Scenic Corridor up for Logging Today, Cal Fire announced that a Director’s Decision has been reached on the Silver Estates Timber Harvest Plan (THP). Unfortunately, Cal Fire has once again chosen to prioritize the interests of the timber industry and …

Guerneville Logging Plan Approved Read More »

Categories: G2. Local Greens

Forest Unlimited: Redwood Planting Volunteers, Sale of Redwood Seedlings

Wine And Water Watch - Mon, 01/02/2023 - 15:58
Forest Unlimited: Redwood Planting Volunteers, Sale of Redwood Seedlings Redwood Planting Volunteers We still need volunteers for our 2023 redwood seedlings plantings. We have doubled our efforts this coming year from previous years thanks to a disbursement from reforestation from California River Watch. The weekend of January 7th and 8th, we will be planting redwoods …

Forest Unlimited: Redwood Planting Volunteers, Sale of Redwood Seedlings Read More »

Categories: G2. Local Greens

New Years at Occupy Biden

Indian Point Safe Energy Coalition - Mon, 01/02/2023 - 06:15

Let’s keep this party going!

Well, party might be a stretch. But taking action with comrades to save our biosphere is truly a celebration of life, joy and festivity included!

Another cause for celebration: this is absolutely the last fundraising pitch from Beyond Extreme Energy (BXE) this year lol. We’re close to our $25,000 end-of-year fundraising goal. Can you chip in $5, $10, or $50?

Donate Here


I am sending you this from Wilmington Delaware, near President Joe Biden’s house with Occupy Biden demanding he take real action on climate by declaring a climate emergency and halting federal government approvals of new fossil fuel projects.

Expansion of the oil, coal and gas industries most responsible for the crisis only pushes us closer to irreversible tipping points as the world continues to heat up. Those of low wealth and people of color trapped in polluting sacrifice zones and, indeed, all life on earth, urgently need Biden to lead. He himself has said the climate crisis has reached “Code Red” intensity but has allowed vast expansion of fossil fuel infrastructure. This holiday season he must give a gift to the world by addressing global heating at the scale and speed that science requires.

Here in Wilmington today our party has started with a little advertising on Delaware Route 141. After sunset we will be walking to Biden’s house to acknowledge whose land he is on, give witness to the ongoing climate emergency, sing carols and read words of hope and determination, and read our demands and the names of groups all over the country making the same demands.

For some reason I can’t quite explain I feel compelled to share a BXE moment from 2022 with you. It was an action to “shut down” the congressional baseball game during the summer. The very mixed bag of climate action we got with the Inflation Reduction Act (IRA) was announced the day before the action.

Some of the organizers decided to back out of the risk arrest portion of the action because of the IRA announcement, causing disharmony and eroding solidarity with the groups participating. I changed my planned role and risked arrest with several Third Act Virginia members, a Sunrise Movement elder, Line3 water protectors who had traveled from Wisconsin, and some DC-based activists, about 20 of us total.

BXE’s Ted Glick was asked at the very last minute to speak at the rally before the action, to fill in for one of the organizers who had stepped back.

Ted spoke beautifully and focused on the need to stop the side-deal which was announced but still largely an unknown at that point. The game was ultimately shut down by a summer thunderstorm, leaving empty the rain-soaked stadium and all the billboards touting carbon capture and biogas and other false solutions.

BXE is still figuring out specific courses of action for 2023, given FERC leadership changes and the continuing LNG build out. But I believe we will continue trying to step up, not back!

-Andy Hinz

You can join us at Occupy Biden until midnight tonight!

WHAT: Occupy Biden action at President Biden’s house

WHEN: Saturday, December 31, 2 PM to 12 am, January 1

WHERE: Beginning at 2 pm at 909 Centre Rd, Wilmington, DE, 5 pm march to Biden house on Barley Mill Road, for a candlelight vigil with music, performers and speakers.

WHO: Youth, parents and grandparents who insist on the right to life on a stable planet

WHY: Time is running out

Initiating Organizations: Occupy Biden, Beyond Extreme Energy, Third Act Virginia

The post New Years at Occupy Biden appeared first on Indian Point Safe Energy Coalition.

Categories: G2. Local Greens

New Years at Occupy Biden

INDIAN POINT SAFE ENERGY COALITION (IPSEC) - Mon, 01/02/2023 - 06:15

Let’s keep this party going!

Well, party might be a stretch. But taking action with comrades to save our biosphere is truly a celebration of life, joy and festivity included!

Another cause for celebration: this is absolutely the last fundraising pitch from Beyond Extreme Energy (BXE) this year lol. We’re close to our $25,000 end-of-year fundraising goal. Can you chip in $5, $10, or $50?

Donate Here


I am sending you this from Wilmington Delaware, near President Joe Biden’s house with Occupy Biden demanding he take real action on climate by declaring a climate emergency and halting federal government approvals of new fossil fuel projects.

Expansion of the oil, coal and gas industries most responsible for the crisis only pushes us closer to irreversible tipping points as the world continues to heat up. Those of low wealth and people of color trapped in polluting sacrifice zones and, indeed, all life on earth, urgently need Biden to lead. He himself has said the climate crisis has reached “Code Red” intensity but has allowed vast expansion of fossil fuel infrastructure. This holiday season he must give a gift to the world by addressing global heating at the scale and speed that science requires.

Here in Wilmington today our party has started with a little advertising on Delaware Route 141. After sunset we will be walking to Biden’s house to acknowledge whose land he is on, give witness to the ongoing climate emergency, sing carols and read words of hope and determination, and read our demands and the names of groups all over the country making the same demands.

For some reason I can’t quite explain I feel compelled to share a BXE moment from 2022 with you. It was an action to “shut down” the congressional baseball game during the summer. The very mixed bag of climate action we got with the Inflation Reduction Act (IRA) was announced the day before the action.

Some of the organizers decided to back out of the risk arrest portion of the action because of the IRA announcement, causing disharmony and eroding solidarity with the groups participating. I changed my planned role and risked arrest with several Third Act Virginia members, a Sunrise Movement elder, Line3 water protectors who had traveled from Wisconsin, and some DC-based activists, about 20 of us total.

BXE’s Ted Glick was asked at the very last minute to speak at the rally before the action, to fill in for one of the organizers who had stepped back.

Ted spoke beautifully and focused on the need to stop the side-deal which was announced but still largely an unknown at that point. The game was ultimately shut down by a summer thunderstorm, leaving empty the rain-soaked stadium and all the billboards touting carbon capture and biogas and other false solutions.

BXE is still figuring out specific courses of action for 2023, given FERC leadership changes and the continuing LNG build out. But I believe we will continue trying to step up, not back!

-Andy Hinz

You can join us at Occupy Biden until midnight tonight!

WHAT: Occupy Biden action at President Biden’s house

WHEN: Saturday, December 31, 2 PM to 12 am, January 1

WHERE: Beginning at 2 pm at 909 Centre Rd, Wilmington, DE, 5 pm march to Biden house on Barley Mill Road, for a candlelight vigil with music, performers and speakers.

WHO: Youth, parents and grandparents who insist on the right to life on a stable planet

WHY: Time is running out

Initiating Organizations: Occupy Biden, Beyond Extreme Energy, Third Act Virginia

The post New Years at Occupy Biden appeared first on Indian Point Safe Energy Coalition.

Categories: G2. Local Greens

January 2023 headlines

DRILL OR DROP? - Mon, 01/02/2023 - 03:38

Keep up to date with January 2023’s news with our digest of daily updated headlines about the business, regulation and campaigns around UK fracking, shale, and onshore oil and gas.

Anti-fracking protest in Misson, Nottinghamshire. Photo: Used with the owner’s consent

Click here for headlines from previous months. Please let us know if we’ve missed something important  contact@DrillOrDrop.com

Monday 2 January 2023

Details published on proposed new IGas oil site at Glentworth, Lincolnshire. DrillOrDrop report

Sunday 1 January 2023

3 onshore oil and gas wells drilled in 2022 – official dataDrillOrDrop analysis of official drilling data

Just Stop Oil accuses police and judiciary of “Working for death not life”. A statement from Just Stop Oil accuses government, police and judiciary which chose “power and profit” over “care and reason” of being “complicit in genocide” by signing “the death sentences of billions of people in the years to come”.

2022 headline archive More headlines
Categories: G2. Local Greens

Details published on new oil site at Glentworth

DRILL OR DROP? - Mon, 01/02/2023 - 03:19

IGas plans for a new oil production site near the village of Glentworth in Lincolnshire have been published online.

Proposed site plan (red line) for new Glentworth oil site. Source: IGas planning application

The 4.4ha site could produce oil for up to 10 years, according to the planning application submitted before Christmas.

But the application documents do not confirm how much oil it is expected to produce.

The new site is less than 500m from the existing Glentworth K oil production site. Any oil and water extracted from the new site would be taken to the existing site by pipeline.

During five of the seven phases of the project, there would be peak heavy goods vehicle (HGV) movements of up to 100/day, the application said.

The proposals are currently due to be decided by Lincolnshire County Council planners, under delegated powers, rather than by councillors.

There are currently no online details of a public consultation.

Key details

These details are based on information from the IGas planning application. DrillOrDrop will report on responses to the proposals.

Application number: PL/0135/22

Location: 2.3km to west of the village of Glentworth. Less than a 500m from the existing IGas Glentworth site. 15km from Lincoln and 8.3km from Gainsborough.

Address: Land to west of Northlands Road, Glentworth

Applicant: IGas

Nearest home: 600+m to south west of site

Nearest public bridleway: 770m to south

Proposed size: 4.4ha, including access track

Current use of site: arable farmland

Closest designations: Grade II* Listed Glentworth Hall approximately 2.25km to the east. No landscape or ecological resources within or close to the application site, IGas said.

Lincolnshire Wolds AONB: The site is 20km west of the AONB.

EIA screening decision: Lincolnshire County Council ruled the application did not need an Environmental Impact Assessment

Oil source: Mexborough Rock. IGas said it had “no plans to drill for shale gas on the site”

Proposed duration of planning permission: 21 years

Predicted maximum production: 2,500 barrels of produced liquid a day, comprising oil and water. The rates and ratios are “unknown at present”, IGas said.

Main drill rig height: 38m

Proposed phases
  1. Construction
    Duration: 5 months. Working hours: 7am-7pm, Monday-Friday and 7am-1pm Saturday. Peak HGV traffic: 100/day.
  2. Drilling
    Duration: 5 months. Working hours: 24-hours per day, 7 days per week. Directional appraisal well would be drilled to a depth of about 1,500m. A lateral production sidetrack may be drilled horizontally. Peak HGV traffic: 100/day.
  3. Extended well test
    Duration: 1 year. Working hours: 24-hours per day, 7 days per week. Tanker movements 7am-7pm Monday to Friday and 7am-1pm on Saturdays. Gas will be flared during the test phase. Peak HGV traffic: 10/day.
  4. Well pad extension and pipeline installation
    Duration: 5 months. Working hours: 7am-7pm, Monday-Friday and 7am-1pm Saturday. Peak HGV traffic: 100/day.
  5. Production well drilling
    Duration: 5 months per well. Working hours: 24-hours per day, 7 days per week. Drilling of up to 6 horizontal development wells over a 10-year period. Peak HGV traffic: 100/day.
  6. Production
    Duration: 10 years. Working hours: 24-hours per day, 7 days per week. Maximum measured distance of each well 3,000m. Gas from the well would be used to generate electricity and in heating units to separate oil and water. Peak HGV traffic: 20/day.
  7. Well abandonment: Working hours: 24-hours per day, 7 days per week. Site restoration working hours: 7am-9pm Monday-Friday and 7am-1pm on Saturdays. Peak HGV traffic: 100/day.

Pre-application consultation: There were 50 individual submissions to the IGas pre-application. This followed delivery of letters to 605 homes, a response rate of just over 8%. IGas said 64% of those that responded (23 out of 43 responses) supported domestic oil production generally and 58% (22 out of 43 responses) supported the development of a new site at Glentworth.

Impacts

Air quality: IGas said “the proposed development would not generate unacceptable impacts on air quality subject to controls the controls to be imposed through the Environmental Permitting regime and regulated by the EA [Environment Agency].

Heritage: IGas said the site could be “assumed to have a low to moderate potential for the recovery of archaeological remains” and is “isolated” from designated heritage assets.

Ecology: The application recommended wildlife enhancements, including bird and bat boxes, refuges for amphibians and reptiles and the addition of species-rich hedgerow and grassland, plus tree and shrub planting. The restoration plan would result in a 42% net gain in biodiversity, the application said.

Hydrology: The risks to groundwater were very low or none, provided mitigation measures were implemented, IGas said.

Landscape and visual impact: IGas said the impact would be “acceptable”.

Noise: IGas said there “will not be any unacceptable noise impact from drilling or production operations during the daytime and at night”.

Transport: The application proposes new passing places on Northlands Road and Kexby Road. The site access and local highway network “can be made up to an appropriate standard for use by traffic generated by the development”, IGas concluded.

Categories: G2. Local Greens

3 onshore oil and gas wells drilled in 2022 – official data

DRILL OR DROP? - Sun, 01/01/2023 - 07:07

Just three onshore wells were drilled in 2022, despite record oil and gas prices.

Data source: North Sea Transition Authority

Official data from the industry regulator showed that wells were spudded (began drilling) at two onshore sites, in Dorset and Lincolnshire, between 1 January and 31 December 2022.

In the same period, 59 wells were drilled offshore in the UK, the database confirms.

Data source: North Sea Transition Authority

2022 is the eighth year of single-figure well drilling onshore in the UK.

The number of wells drilled in 2022 was higher than in 2021 (no wells drilled) or 2020 (two wells). But the total drilled in 2022 was the third lowest in the past 22 years.

Since 1918, only five years have seen a lower number of onshore wells in a year than in 2022 (2021, 1918, 1924, 1931, 1950 and 2020.

1943 saw the largest number of onshore wells drilled: a total of 162. This was the only calendar year in  more than 100 years when total onshore drilling topped 100 wells. 70 or more wells were drilled in a year in 1939, 1985 and 1986.

Details Extract from Public Wellbore Search of onshore oil and gas wells drilled in 2022.
Source: North Sea Transition Authority

2022 data from the North Sea Transition Authority public wellbore search listed two sidetrack wells at Perenco’s Wareham oil field and one sidetrack at Angus Energy’s Saltfleetby gas site.

The Wareham wells, in licence area PL89, were spudded on 3 May (L97/10-C10) and 25 May 2022 (L97/10-C11).

The Saltfleetby sidetrack (L47/16- 11x), in PEDL0005, was spudded on 28 October.

Location of Wareham wells drilled in 2022 (see red markers).
Source: North Sea Transition Authority Stalled projects

Despite the prospect of increased profits from oil and gas production, some predicted onshore projects stalled again in 2022.

Horse Hill, Surrey: Plans for two production wells, previously expected to be drilled in 2021, were put on hold again in 2022 because of UK Oil & Gas operations in Turkey. The Horse Hill site is the subject of a legal challenge due to go to the supreme court in 2023.

Biscathorpe, Lincolnshire: Egdon Resources was refused planning permission in November 2021 for a new sidetrack well. An appeal was heard in October 2022. The decision is expected in early 2023.

North Kelsey, Lincolnshire: Egdon Resources was refused planning permission in 2022 for a production well. The company has appealed.

Waddock Cross, Dorset and Keddington, Lincolnshire: Egdon Resources has planning permission for wells at both these sites but neither were drilled during 2022.

Woodsetts, south Yorkshire: Government refused planning permission to Ineos Upstream for this exploratory shale gas well. The company has not appealed.

2022 saw a 49-day lifting of the moratorium on fracking in England by the Liz Truss government. But the moratorium was swiftly reinstated by her replacement as prime minister, Rishi Sunak.

We’ll be watching for any legal challenge by the shale gas industry against the government in 2023.There are no current planning permissions or applications for onshore shale gas development in the UK.

Links to previous analysis of well drilling

2021

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

Categories: G2. Local Greens

Contract Stewardship: A Valuable Tool in Forest Restoration

La Jicarita - Sat, 12/31/2022 - 11:35

Opinion By KAY MATTHEWS

If anyone should be pissed off about the recent poaching of big ponderosas near El Valle it should be me. My partner Mark Schiller and I thinned this area over 15 years ago as part of the Contract Stewardship program on the Camino Real Ranger District: harvest the smaller diameter trees—ponder osa, piñon, and juniper—for firewood to favor the growth of the indigenous ponderosa and understory grassland. Here are the tracks of the poacher who drove in and chain-sawed the tree we favored by cutting the smaller trees crowding its growth. They left half the tree on the ground.

 

 

 

 

 

 

There’s always been tree poaching in the Carson National Forest. Resentment over illegal takings of community land grants that resulted in United States Forest Service ownership lingers in the cultural zeitgeist. Why should anyone who lives on a former land grant acknowledge and pay the Forest Service for firewood or vigas that are rightfully theirs? For hundreds of years villagers cut trees surrounding their communities for firewood or vigas and to create a wildfire buffer.

But we’ve lived under USFS management for a long time now and resentment has become resignation, undergirded by hope that the agency would manage the former land grants to benefit the local people. It’s motto, “Caring for the land and serving the people,” has been compromised by misguided policies that have created the mess we’re in today: prioritizing large scale logging over other multiple uses and 100 years of fire suppression, which left our forest overstocked and unhealthy. The increase in both the number of wildfires near communities and the intensity of those fires—exacerbated by drought and the climate crisis—has made forest restoration a priority.

The poaching situation on the Camino Real Ranger District has worsened because of the lack of the green fuelwood areas that for years provided much of the firewood needed in our communities. According to the USFS, areas where these projects were managed—marking the trees that people could cut—aren’t available anymore because of lack of access and USFS management capacity, and the preponderance of small trees. Now, the emphasis is on thinning the smaller diameter trees to allow the larger diameter trees to flourish and establish what’s called a Wildland/Urban Interface (WUI) to protect communities from wildfire.

I’ve written numerous articles in La Jicarita about the restoration projects undertaken with Collaborative Forest Restoration Program (CFRP) funding, under the auspices of the USFS. Now, with much of the Carson designated as one of the country’s top priority landscapes because of its vulnerability to wildfire, forest restoration projects are being funded through the Enchanted Circle Priority Landscape by the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act of 2021. Multiple agencies are collaborating on these projects: USFS, the New Mexico State Forester, the New Mexico Forest Industries Association, Taos Soil and Water Conservation District, and multiple non-profits such as The Nature Conservancy and Forest Stewards Guild.

But a well-known El Valle resident believes that one of these forest restoration projects between El Valle and Las Trampas is to blame for the poaching that’s occurred near and within its boundaries. I’m on the board of the Rio de Las Trampas Forest Council, which is working to thin more than 200 acres of WUI forest between the two villages. The unit is accessed off FR 207 along a narrow dirt road that borders the north side of the project. On the north side of this road are the acres that Mark and I, and other local people, thinned as stewardship blocks under the management of Henry Lopez, Camino Real RD Forest Tech. Back in February of this year author Bill deBuys sent a letter to the Regional Forester in Albuquerque complaining that “by increasing access to more forest and by clearing small material from around the large trees, the project [the Rio de Las Trampas Forest Council] will put more large trees at risk and render them easier to cut down. Paradoxically, the conservation stewardship program, as presently designed, will doom much of the resource it is intended to protect.” He also complained about the lack of law enforcement by the USFS and that the project isn’t ecologically sound. He never came to the Forest Council board to air his concerns and sent the letter to the Regional Forester without our knowledge.

We responded to the USFS in a lengthy rebuttal of Bill’s claims, especially his egregious attempt to “blame the victim:” “ . . . we do not believe that thinning to remove ladder fuels from around large old trees is causing poaching. That line of thinking places the blame on the victims, which are in this case, the forest, the trees, and the leñeros who are working hard to do things the right way.” We continued to work, training more leñeros (wood cutters) and marking more acres for thinning until everything shut down last summer because of the Hermits Peak and Calf Canyon Fire. While only a small portion of the wildfire was on the Carson, both the Carson and Santa Fe national forests were closed during the duration of the fire and for quite a while afterword to facilitate fireline and restoration work.

A few weeks ago, Bill sent another letter, this time an email, to members of the Rio de Las Trampas Forest Council (not everyone on the board was included in the email) and the Camino Real Ranger District, along with a file of 30 photos of newly cut ponderosa pine trees on our former stewardship blocks and 14 felled trees near the El Valle camposanto. He speculated that most of the poaching occurs at night and is for commercial use because of the large size of the trees (and obviously the green wood can’t be burned for fuel this winter). He wanted to know when the Forest Service will “take action” and when our Forest Council will “withhold cooperation until the Forest Service takes such action?”

The Rio de Las Trampas Forest Council has documented the poaching that occurs in our project and has had numerous conversations with the Forest Service about it, asking that it assign more law enforcement to the area and provide better information about where the public can access Dead & Down firewood. We’ve complained about the lack of green fuelwood areas, noting that stewardship work isn’t sufficient to supply the needs of our local communities.

But now, at this critically important moment when the Forest Service will actually have the money to hire more law enforcement and contractors to expand restoration work beyond the WUI areas to make our forests more resilient and provide more firewood, Bill continues to blame the victims. As someone who thinned more than five acres of forest over the years and who now oversees a much larger project, I, too, hate seeing the big trees that I hoped would flourish cut down by those who are greedy, angry, desperate, don’t care, or are just woefully ignorant. Those of us involved in restoration work share a proprietary attachment to these lands that we work. The more opportunities we can provide for others who are willing to commit the time and energy to thin a stewardship block is essential. We can’t do it without partners and we can’t do it without the support of the local communities. Playing the blame game gets us nowhere.

Categories: G2. Local Greens

What to watch in 2023?

DRILL OR DROP? - Sat, 12/31/2022 - 08:25

DrillOrDrop’s checklist of what to look out for in 2023 on UK onshore oil and gas

Fracking
  • Will the shale gas industry make a legal challenge over the reinstatement of the moratorium on fracking in England?
  • Will we see another government U-turn?
  • Will there be new scientific evidence on induced seismicity?

We’ll also be watching what happens with Northern Ireland’s overdue review into how firms get fracking licences.

Shale gas sites Preston New Road
  • Cuadrilla’s planning permission for plugging the horizontal wells and restoring the site expires in April 2023.
  • A planning application for another two years at the site is expected soon
  • Cuadrilla also has until 30 June 2023 to develop alternative uses for the fracked wells, to the satisfaction of the regulator, the North Sea Transition Authority.
Misson
  • Nottinghamshire County Council has ordered IGas and the landowner to restore the Misson Springs site. We’ll be watching what happens.
Other planning issues

Decisions are due in 2023 on:

An appeal is due to get underway in 2023 on Egdon Resources’ appeal against refusal of another extension of planning permission at the North Kelsey site.

We’ll also be watching to see whether South Western Energy submits a revised application for Puddletown.

Legal challenges

Sarah Finch takes her long-running case on the climate impacts of oil production to the supreme court in 2023.

The government has until March 2023 to revise its net zero strategy after losing a challenge by Friends of the Earth, ClientEarth and the Good Law Project. The high court ruled that the government should outline exactly how the net zero policies will achieve emissions targets.

A decision is due early in 2023 on a challenge by Friends of the Earth against government $1.15bn funding for a liquified natural gas project in Mozambique.

Protect Dunsfold, backed by the Good Law Project, and Waverley Borough Council have sought to challenge ministerial approval of gas exploration at Dunsfold.

Climate campaigners are examining the possibility of legal challenges to the government’s approvals of a new coalmine in Cumbria and offshore oil and gas licences.

Production

Will UK onshore oil production reach 15,000 barrels per day, last exceeded in March 2020?

We’ll be following oil volumes extracted at Wressle, the UK’s newest onshore oil production site. The operator, Egdon Resources, is seeking to generate electricity from waste gases at the site and lift the current permitted limit on oil production.

We’ll also watch how Surrey oil production responds to water injection at Horse Hill and Brockham.

New gas production wells at Rathlin Energy’s West Newton-A site in East Yorkshire could be drilled in the first half of 2023, reports have suggested.

Drilling a new production sidetrack should be completed in early 2023 at Angus Energy’s gas Saltfleetby site in Lincolnshire.

But will Horse Hill Developments Limited drill any of its permitted production wells in Surrey? And will Egdon Resources use its planning permissions to drill new wells at Keddington in Lincolnshire and Waddock Cross in Dorset.

Protest

The government’s new public order measures, if approved in 2023, would have a major impact on protest, including new offences of locking-on, going equipped to lock-on and obstruction of major transport works. The police would have extended stop and search powers and could ban people from attending protests under disruption prevention orders.

Other key issues

Emissions: Will the UK government introduce new policies on reducing emissions from the production and use of fossil fuels, as recommended by the Climate Change Committee?

Divestment: Will more councils and universities halt pension fund investments in fossil fuels?

Repurposing and renewables: Will the trend continue for repurposing oil and gas sites for geothermal energy? Will research show that carbon could be stored in old wells?

Public attitudes: How will people feel about fracking for shale gas in a year’s time?

People: Lord Deben is expected to step down at chair of the Climate Change Committee in June 2023

Categories: G2. Local Greens

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