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Empowering Colorado Communities: The Importance of the Community Right to Know Act

FracTracker - Mon, 03/25/2024 - 13:57

Communities in Colorado should be immediately informed of oil and gas spills that increase their health risks. Our analysis shows why public health alerts are particularly important for communities located near extraction operations.

The post Empowering Colorado Communities: The Importance of the Community Right to Know Act appeared first on FracTracker Alliance.

Video: B2Gold CEO on laying the foundations for growth

Mining.Com - Mon, 03/25/2024 - 12:14

B2Gold (TSX: BTO) is navigating a capital-intensive period aimed at pushing the 1 million oz. gold mark from 2025, CEO Clive Johnson says.

Johnson, an industry veteran with several discovery-to-mine projects under his belt, says he’s confident the company can find more metal within its portfolio of assets in the Philippines, Namibia and Mali.

“We don’t need to go out and buy a lot of growth right now because we have growth in the company, and our exploration team is one of the best in the world,” he told The Northern Miner’s western editor, Henry Lazenby, during the recent Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada’s event in Toronto.

B2Gold is expected to have lower production levels in 2024, between 850,000 and 900,000 oz. gold. It has budgeted about $65 million spread for exploration throughout the portfolio this year. That comes on top of significant capital expenditure for expanding the Mali-based Fekola operation and developing the Goose project in Nunavut. The company is also exploring the smaller-scale Gramalote project in Colombia.

Watch the full video interview below.

Awalé Resources stock soars on 45.7 g/t gold find

Mining.Com - Mon, 03/25/2024 - 10:45

Awalé Resources (TSXV: ARIC) stock soared on Monday after the Newmont-backed gold explorer reported outstanding assay results of 45.7 grams per tonne gold over 32 metres from drilling on the Odienné project in Côte d’Ivoire.

This intersection was drilled at the Charger target. which along with Sceptre East target has become the company’s main focus of exploration aimed at discovering the first major iron oxide copper gold (IOCG) deposit in West Africa.

Andrew Chubb, CEO of Awalé Resources, called this drill hole “absolutely spectacular”, adding, “I have been looking at gold projects for the last 20 years and have never seen anything like this.”

Located in the northwest Denguèlé region, close to the borders of Mali and Guinea, the Odienné project comprises seven permits that together cover 2,462 km2. Currently, two of the permits – Odienné East’ and Sienso  – have been granted.

In 2017, Awalé initiated its involvement in the project by acquiring an initial two permits from Aforo Resources – an Australian company – in partnership with their local associate – ANGET – which still retains a 10% interest.

Following its acquisition, the company embarked on a systematic exploration campaign that incorporated legacy data from Randgold Resources, which conducted a first-pass exploration geochemistry of the property in the 1990s. Subsequent drilling on identified targets led to the discovery of high-grade gold at Empire Main.

The Charger target was later drilled with a similar mineralization model. and it delivered multiple high-grade significant intercepts such as 32 metres at 3.0 g/t gold from 74 metres downhole, including 4 metres at 12.4 g/t gold from 78 metres downhole.

Four holes for a total of 699 metres were completed at Charger during the latest drilling phase, with the 45.7 g/t intercept being the only one to encounter significant mineralization. The mineralization, according to the company, is consistently high grade throughout the reported interval.

Chubb said it will restart drilling in April, representing the first phase of the 25,000 metres being planned for the year.

“This drilling will progress the Charger, BBM and Sceptre discoveries and will scout drill some prospective pipeline targets. Confidence is growing that Odienné has the potential to be a world-class mine camp in Cote d’Ivoire,” he added.

The project is currently being developed as an earn-in joint venture signed with Newmont in July 2022. Under the agreement, Newmont has the opportunity to earn up to 65% ownership of the two permits by spending a total of $15 million on exploration, and has an option to purchase the 10% held by ANGET.

Shares of Awalé Resources more than doubled by midday Monday, trading at C$0.85 apiece as of 1:40 p.m. ET. Earlier, the stock hit a 52-week peak of C$1.10. Awalé’s market capitalization stood at C$53.3 million ($39.2m).

Research and Innovation week at Cambrian College coming up in Sudbury, Ontario

Mining.Com - Mon, 03/25/2024 - 10:44

From medical dummies to drill holes, plenty of research and development (R&D) happens at Cambrian College during Research and Innovation Week, taking place April 8-12 at Cambrian’s main campus in Sudbury, Ontario.

“We cover everything from agriculture and food production to mining,” Dr. Mike Commito, director of Cambrian R&D, the college’s applied research division said in a statement. “All of our projects involve staff, faculty and, most importantly, students. Research and Innovation Week is a great way to show the campus community and the general public just how much we do and the types of research we do.”

Several events are planned, beginning with the Research Showcase on Monday in the college’s eDome. Display booths will highlight the research projects and partnerships developed this past year such as a special 3D-printed ribcage to be used for medical simulation at Health Sciences North in Sudbury. Other projects include determining the best method to characterize explosives and a device for clearing debris from mining drillholes.

“More industry partners are coming to Cambrian seeking our help in solving real-time, real-world challenges through applied research,” added Janneke Nicholls, Cambrian’s vice-president in charge of applied research. “It’s a great way for them to find solutions and scout new talent, and it keeps our academic and research staff and students right on the leading edge of what is happening in industry.”

That new talent includes Brandon Perron of Sudbury, who is in the final year of the welding and fabrication technician program. He has worked on a number of projects with Cambrian R&D.

“Through applied research, I’ve been able to do a lot of cool welding that I didn’t even do yet in my program, and because of that I’ve been able to excel in my classes much quicker than if I didn’t have this opportunity,” said Perron.

“I do have a job lined up already when I graduate because I got some references through applied research. It taught me so much stuff and I was able to shine in the job interview. To other students, if you get the opportunity to work in applied research, go for it because you are going to learn so much and it’s like a family. It’s a win-win.”

Research and Innovation Week will also feature a live episode of Cambrian R&D’s podcast, Unlikely Innovators, as well as the Student Innovation Challenge Powered by RBC Future Launch, plus a special funding announcement involving the animation and game design industries.

More information is here.

Patriot Battery Metals makes new discovery at Corvette lithium project in Quebec

Mining.Com - Mon, 03/25/2024 - 09:07

Patriot Battery Metals (TSX: PMET; ASX: PMT) announced on Monday the discovery of a new spodumene pegmatite, named CV14, along the geological trend of the CV9 and CV10 clusters at its Corvette property in Quebec.

Grab sample assays from CV14 revealed concentrations of 0.94% lithium oxide (Li2O) and 0.86% Li2O, with the outcrop measuring 33 metres by 9 metres in size.

“The discovery highlights the extensive nature of the spodumene mineralized system along the CV lithium trend, which extends across the property where a large portion remains unexplored for lithium pegmatite,” Darren Smith, VP of exploration said in a statement.

“We are excited to follow up this area with systematic surface exploration as this local prospective lithium pegmatite trend has now been extended to approximately 3.6 kilometres.”

Patriot Battery Metals aims to fast-track Corvette lithium production

Additionally, the 2023 surface exploration program uncovered a mineralized pegmatite boulder (0.53% Li2O) located about 450 metres up-ice to the northeast of CV14.

Based on interpreted glacial ice direction in the area, it may suggest the potential for a yet-to-be-discovered lithium pegmatite to be present to the north-northeast of the primary CV9-CV10-CV14 trend, the company said.

“The scale and the location of the Corvette project imply that it’s going to be a useful project to help underwrite the balance of the supply chain that’s required to support value-added chemicals the energy transition requires,” CEO Ken Brinsden told The Northern Miner in an interview in February.

Corvette, the eighth largest lithium pegmatite globally, hosts large spodumene crystals, enhancing processing efficiency and recovery rates, Brinsden said.

With C$133 million ($98 million) in funds as of the second fiscal quarter — much of it from Albemarle, which invested C$109 million ($80 million) last year — the company said it is well-financed to push forward with exploration, technical studies and the permitting process.

Shares of Patriot Battery Metals fell 2.7% by 12:02 p.m. EDT Monday. The lithium developer has a market capitalization of C$1.56 billion ($1.15 billion).

Nexa Resources eyes expansion in Peru

Mining.Com - Mon, 03/25/2024 - 08:53

Latin America-focused Nexa Resources (NYSE: NEXA), which operates the largest underground zinc mine in Peru, Cerro Lindo, is seeking to expand its footprint in the nation with its submitted exploration permit application in Cajamarca. 

The area of interest covers 1,000 hectares and it is the second application in eight days submitted by the company targeting Cajamarca, one of the minerals-rich northern regions of Peru, local paper Gestión reported.

The move follows Nexa’s announcement in January in which it earmarked $58 million for exploration this year, as part of its long-term strategy to replace and increase mineral reserves and resources.

Nexa has nine operations distributed between Brazil and Peru – three of which are refineries and six mines. These include Cerro Lindo, which is among the 20 largest zinc mines in the world, and the largest zinc refinery in the Americas, Cajamarquilla.

Peru is the world’s no. 2 copper producer after Chile and an important producer of zinc.

Ivanhoe Electric earns into 60% of nickel-copper project in Côte d’Ivoire

Mining.Com - Mon, 03/25/2024 - 06:46

Ivanhoe Electric (NYSE American: IE) (TSX: IE) has completed its earn-in to acquire a 60% interest in the Samapleu-Grata nickel-copper project in Côte d’Ivoire after satisfying the expenditure requirements outlined in an agreement from three years ago.

The completion of the earn-in, which required Ivanhoe to spend C$25 million on exploration by March 2024, follows the release of an updated preliminary economic assessment (PEA) by Sama Resources (TSXV: SME), its joint venture partner on the polymetallic project, last week.

The PEA demonstrated the potential for a 16-year open-pit mine producing copper concentrates of 38,627 tonnes and nickel concentrates of 55,119 tonnes a year, with associated byproducts such as platinum and palladium.

Its average annual nickel metal in concentrate will amount to approximately 7,165 tonnes and copper metal in concentrate of approximately 10,043 tonnes.

Using a long-term nickel price of $8.83/lb. and copper price of $3.99/lb., the study calculated a post-tax net present value (at an 8% discount) of $257 million and an internal rate of return of 22.3%. The initial capital cost is $338 million.

The 2024 PEA, said Sama, was an improvement on the study published in 2020 since it effectively doubled the mill feed and changed the flowsheet to produce conventional nickel and copper concentrates. In doing so, it increased the overall nickel concentrate production by 19%, and increased the life-of-mine copper concentrate production by more than 100% over its projected mine life.

These project economics only included the Grata, Main and Extension deposits and the Sipilou Sud laterite deposit, which together cover just 3% of the 835 km2 project area at Samapleu-Grata.

This, according to Ivanhoe, provides ample opportunities for exploration upside and expansion opportunities, including at known mineralized zones at Yepleu and Draba.

“We are particularly encouraged to see the polymetallic nature of the project and the inclusion of all key payable metals – nickel, copper, gold, cobalt, platinum and palladium – and the significant improvement in both the quality and quantity of potential future copper concentrate production,” Ivanhoe Electric CEO Taylor Melvin said in the March 21 news release.

Following the latest updates, the Samapleu-Grata project is now a 60/40 joint venture between Ivanhoe Electric and Sama. In addition to earning its 60% interest, Ivanhoe also owns 22.7% of the common shares of Sama.

Ivanhoe Electric’s shares rose by 2.8% to C$12.34 by 11:15 a.m. in Toronto. The Vancouver-headquartered copper explorer has a market capitalization of C$1.49 billion ($1.1bn).

Researchers evaluate paths to create super diamonds

Mining.Com - Mon, 03/25/2024 - 05:36

Researchers are evaluating several paths to create super diamonds, scientifically known as eight-atom body-centred cubic (BC8) crystals.

A recent paper in The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters explains that BC8 is a distinct carbon phase: not diamond, but very similar and it is predicted to be a stronger material, exhibiting a 30% greater resistance to compression than diamond. The crystalline high-pressure carbon phase is theoretically predicted to be the most stable under pressures, surpassing 10 million atmospheres.

BC8 is believed to be found in the centre of carbon-rich exoplanets, whose presence is plausible based on recent astrophysical observations. These celestial bodies, characterized by considerable mass, experience gigantic pressures reaching millions of atmospheres in their deep interiors. 

“The extreme conditions prevailing within these carbon-rich exoplanets may give rise to structural forms of carbon such as diamond and BC8,” Ivan Oleynik, a physics professor at the University of South Florida and senior author of the article, said in a media statement. “Therefore, an in-depth understanding of the properties of the BC8 carbon phase becomes critical for the development of accurate interior models of these exoplanets.”

BC8 is a high-pressure phase of both silicon and germanium that is recoverable to ambient conditions, and theory suggests that BC8 carbon should also be stable at ambient conditions.

Supercomputer simulations predicting the synthesis pathways for the elusive BC8 super-diamond. (Image by Mark Meamber, LLNL).

According to Oleynik and his colleagues, the most important reason that diamond is so hard is that the tetrahedral shape of the four-nearest-neighbour atoms in the diamond structure perfectly matches the optimal configuration of the four valence electrons in column-14 elements in the periodic table (beginning with carbon, followed by silicon and germanium).

“The BC8 structure maintains this perfect tetrahedral nearest-neighbour shape, but without the cleavage planes found in the diamond structure,” Jon Eggert, co-author of the paper, said. “The BC8 phase of carbon at ambient conditions would likely be much tougher than diamond.”

Through multi-million atomic molecular-dynamics simulations using the fastest exascale supercomputer in the world, the team uncovered the extreme metastability of the diamond at very high pressures, significantly exceeding its range of thermodynamic stability.

The key to this success was the development of very accurate machine-learning interatomic potential that describes interactions between individual atoms with unprecedented quantum accuracy at a wide range of high-pressure and temperature conditions.

“By efficiently implementing this potential on GPU-based (graphics processing unit) Frontier, we can now accurately simulate the time evolution of billions of carbon atoms under extreme conditions at experimental time and length scales,” Oleynik said. “We predicted that the post-diamond BC8 phase would be experimentally accessible only within a narrow, high-pressure, high-temperature region of the carbon phase diagram.”

In the researchers’ view, the significance of this study is twofold. First, it elucidates the reasons behind the inability of previous experiments to synthesize and observe the elusive BC8 phase of carbon. This limitation arises from the fact that BC8 can only be synthesized within a very narrow range of pressures and temperatures.

Additionally, it predicts viable compression pathways to access this highly restricted domain where BC8 synthesis becomes achievable. Oleynik, Eggert, and others are collaborating to explore these theoretical pathways using Discovery Science shot allocations at the National Ignition Facility, a laser-based inertial confinement fusion research device located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California.

The team dreams of, one day, growing a BC8 super diamond in the laboratory if only they could synthesize the phase and then recover a BC8 seed crystal back to ambient conditions.

Gemfields loses sparkle as profit falls 86% on cancelled auction

Mining.Com - Mon, 03/25/2024 - 05:03

Coloured gemstones miner Gemfields (LON: GEM) posted on Monday a 86% drop in pre-tax profit for 2023 due partly to the cancellation of a high-quality emerald auction in November, a lower number of carats sold and a write-down in its platinum group metals investments.

The London-based company experienced a 23% drop in revenue, amounting to $262 million from $341.1 million, and recorded a loss after tax of $2.8 million, a significant shift from the $74.3 million profit reported in 2022. 

The decline was attributed partially to unrealized fair value losses of $28 million from the company’s 6.54% equity stake in South African platinum group miner Sedibelo Resources. 

Gemfields warns of $2.8 million loss on write-down

The estimated value of this investment was revised down to $4 million, a decrease of $28 million from its worth in 2022.

Gemfields highlighted that inflationary pressures have been impacting its revenues as operating expenses remain high.

Despite a slight decrease in global commodity prices towards the end of 2023, concerns regarding high interest rates and geopolitical tensions persist worldwide, leading to increased costs, the company said. 

The miner reduced its final dividend to 0.857 US cents from 4.125 US cents, funding the payment from its income reserves.

“Gemfields had a year of both achievements and challenges in 2023, “ chief executive Sean Gilbertson said in a statement. “The group recorded its second highest annual revenues [the highest was in 2022] and saw healthy prices paid at our auctions of rough emeralds and rubies.”

Emerald auction completed

The overall lower quality and quantity of premium emerald production at Kagem led to the cancellation of the November auction, which was completed last week — from March 5 to March 22.

The sale brought in $17.1 million, lower than the $25.5 million achieved at the previous auction held from August to September 2023.

It sold 93% of the emeralds offered, equivalent to 3.85 million rough stones at an average price of $4.45 per carat. 

Managing director of product and sales, Adrian Banks, said the March auction offering included large quantities of lower-quality emeralds, which are typically destined for smaller manufacturers in India, through the company’s direct sales channel.

He said those parcels accounted for 55% of the auction by weight, resulting in the lower overall dollar-per-carat figure realized at the auction.

Since July 2009, Gemfields has held 47 emerald auctions that have generated over $1 billion in revenues.

Taseko to become sole owner of Gibraltar mine

Mining.Com - Mon, 03/25/2024 - 03:41

Taseko Mines (TSX, LON: TKO) (NYSE: TGB) said on Monday it’s acquiring the remaining 12.5% interest in the Gibraltar mine, the second largest open-pit copper operation in Canada, from current holders Dowa Metals & Mining and Furukawa.

The move will boost the Canadian miner’s attributable copper production by 14% and increase cash flow as the company progresses with construction at the Florence copper project in Arizona, CEO Stuart McDonald said.

The definitive agreement will see Taseko pay C$117 million ($86.1m) over a period of ten years for the shares held by Dowa and Furukawa in Cariboo Copper Corp. 

With the move, the Vancouver-based company will be the sole owner of Cariboo Copper Corp, effectively gaining a 100% interest in Gibraltar in south-central British Columbia.

It also gives it additional offtake rights as the Cariboo offtake contract comes back to Taseko, providing potential cost savings, McDonald said.

On top of the initial C$5 million ($3.7m) to be paid to Dowa and Furukawa (C$2.5 million each) after closing the deal, Taseko may be responsible for contingent payments depending on copper prices and Gibraltar’s cashflow, the company said.

“We have established a positive relationship with Dowa and Furukawa over the last 14 years,” McDonald noted. “Given that both groups are reducing their copper smelting businesses and are exiting their copper mining investments, we’ve been able to structure this exit from our long-term partnership in a mutually beneficial manner.”

The company posted its highest ever revenue of $525 million for 2023 earlier this month, thanks mainly to the contribution of Gibraltar mine. The revenue represented a 34% increase compared to 2022.

In 2023, the mine produced a total of 122.6 million pounds of copper, with an average copper recovery rate of 82.6% and head grade of 0.25%. This production was higher than the company’s original guidance and also 26% higher than in 2022.

Taseko is also close to beginning production at Florence, which is expected to happen in the fourth quarter of 2025.

Criminals’ attempt to kidnap Peruvian miners quashed

Mining.Com - Sun, 03/24/2024 - 12:20

The Pataz Unified Command, whose members hail from the National Armed Forces and the National Police, detained three men in their mid-to-late twenties, who attempted to kidnap a group of miners in the La Libertad region, northwestern Peru.

According to official information made public by state news agency Andina, the action took place in an area called La Zeta after the miners made an emergency call from their camp saying that the criminals beat them during the kidnap attempt. Their ultimate goal was to build a tunnel between two mines to operate illegally. 

As the Unified Command chased the kidnappers, military patrols surveilled the surrounding areas.

Once apprehended, the detainees surrendered different types of ammunition and two balaclavas. They were presented before the Hualanga police station and the National Prosecutor’s Office.

The gold-rich Pataz province has been in a state of emergency since December 2023, when nine people died and 15 were injured after a group of armed men raided the Poderosa mine facilities.

Military and police officers have joined forces to maintain internal order and counteract illegal mining and related crimes, at a time when the Peruvian parliament has repealed the first provision of legislative decree 1607 that gave the police special powers to detain miners who are not registered in the Comprehensive Mining Formalization Registry (Reinfo) and who are illegally transporting weapons and explosives.

Shell CEO Laments: “How Dare You Sue Us for Ruining the Planet!”

Royal Dutch Shell Plc .com - Sun, 03/24/2024 - 10:10
That’s right, folks—while the rest of the world is desperately trying to curb emissions, Shell is busy backpedaling on its promises faster than you can say “hypocrisy.”

Posted 24 March 2024 by John Donovan

In a jaw-dropping display of corporate entitlement, Frans Everts, the CEO of Shell Netherlands, took to the airwaves to bemoan the audacity of environmental organizations daring to sue companies like Shell. Because clearly, holding polluting behemoths accountable for their role in climate catastrophe is just plain unfair, right?

In a riveting performance on TV program WNL Op Zondag, Everts cried foul, claiming that climate lawsuits were nothing short of economic sabotage. “It does not solve the problems,” he lamented, conveniently forgetting that maybe—just maybe—stopping the relentless pollution might actually, you know, solve a few problems.

According to Everts, these lawsuits are forcing poor, innocent companies like Shell to shrink and take their jobs elsewhere. Because when your business model relies on destroying the planet, any attempt to rein you in is obviously a direct attack on the economy. Makes perfect sense, doesn’t it?

But wait, it gets even better! Everts had the gall to criticize a judge’s ruling that Shell must actually, you know, reduce its CO2 emissions more quickly. Shocking, right? How dare anyone suggest that a company responsible for untold environmental devastation should actually clean up its act?

And let’s not forget Everts’ bold claim that Shell is some sort of climate hero, pouring billions into renewable energies like offshore wind turbines and biofuel plants. Because nothing says “saving the planet” like raking in profits from renewable energy while continuing to pump out fossil fuels like there’s no tomorrow.

But don’t be fooled by Shell’s greenwashing tactics. Despite their flashy investments in renewables, the reality is that Shell has actually weakened its targets for reducing CO2 emissions. That’s right, folks—while the rest of the world is desperately trying to curb emissions, Shell is busy backpedaling on its promises faster than you can say “hypocrisy.”

So, here’s to Shell, the champion of corporate greed and environmental destruction, bravely fighting against those pesky climate lawsuits with all the integrity of a used car salesman. Because when it comes to prioritizing profits over the planet, Shell truly takes the cake.

Disclaimer: Content published on this non-commercial advert-free platform may incorporate information generated by Artificial Intelligence (AI) and various other technological means, including translation and information published on Wikipedia. The articles presented may be satirical adaptations derived from one or more previously published sources, crafted to maintain factual accuracy while incorporating elements of satire. Individuals or entities mentioned in our articles are encouraged to notify us of any inaccuracies requiring rectification. Readers are advised to verify all information for accuracy and completeness independently. Any actions taken based on this content are at your own risk. Shell CEO Laments: “How Dare You Sue Us for Ruining the Planet!” was first posted on March 24, 2024 at 6:10 pm.
©2018 "Royal Dutch Shell Plc .com". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement. Please contact me at john@shellnews.net

Oil Giants in Panic Mode: Payout Promises Up in Smoke as Prices Plummet

Royal Dutch Shell Plc .com - Sun, 03/24/2024 - 09:58
Posted by John Donovan: 24 March 2024 Well, well, well, it looks like the bigwigs in the oil industry are having a bit of a “Oh shit, what now?” moment as oil prices take a nosedive. In a shocking turn of events that absolutely no one could have predicted (except maybe every economist ever), Brent crude decided to plummet a whopping 24% in a single day, leaving oil executives scratching their heads and frantically revising their plans to return billions to investors.

It seems the recent oil price rollercoaster was triggered by Russia saying “nyet” to an OPEC agreement to cut output. And just like that, the oil market went from “steady sailing” to “full-blown panic mode” faster than you can say “fossil fuels are so last century.”

Now, in a desperate attempt to keep investors from jumping ship, oil companies are scrambling to reassess their spending plans. But let’s be real here, folks—when your primary source of income is as volatile as a teenager’s mood swings, you’re bound to hit a few bumps in the road.

According to industry analysts, it’s “survival mode” for the oil majors now. And by survival mode, they mean kiss those fancy share buybacks and dividend growth plans goodbye. In fact, the burning question on everyone’s minds seems to be: Who will be the first to slash their dividends and send investors into a frenzy?

But fear not, dear shareholders, for some oil companies are trying their best to put on a brave face amidst the chaos. Chevron, for instance, has pledged to shower investors with up to $80 billion over the next five years. Because nothing says “financial stability” like throwing money at the problem and hoping it goes away.

Meanwhile, the likes of Shell and Exxon Mobil are reevaluating their spending plans faster than you can say “budget crisis.” And let’s not forget BP, who, despite their profits taking a nosedive, have decided to raise their dividend. Because when in doubt, just pretend everything is fine and hope for the best, right?

But hey, at least some analysts are optimistic, predicting that we might see a return of scrip dividends if this whole price war thing drags on. Because nothing says “we’re totally not panicking” like paying your shareholders with imaginary money.

So, here’s to the oil giants, navigating the treacherous waters of the market with all the finesse of a bull in a china shop. Because when it comes to managing financial crises, they sure know how to make a splash.

DISCLAIMER: Content published on this non-commercial advert-free platform may incorporate information generated by Artificial Intelligence (AI) and various other technological means, including translation and information published on Wikipedia. The articles presented may be satirical adaptations derived from one or more previously published sources, crafted to maintain factual accuracy while incorporating elements of satire. Individuals or entities mentioned in our articles are encouraged to notify us of any inaccuracies requiring rectification. Readers are advised to verify all information for accuracy and completeness independently. Any actions taken based on this content are at your own risk. Oil Giants in Panic Mode: Payout Promises Up in Smoke as Prices Plummet was first posted on March 24, 2024 at 5:58 pm.
©2018 "Royal Dutch Shell Plc .com". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement. Please contact me at john@shellnews.net

Shell’s Great Escape: Fleeing Protests with the Efficiency of a Greased Pig

Royal Dutch Shell Plc .com - Sun, 03/24/2024 - 09:47
As long as the oil keeps flowing and the profits keep rolling in, who cares about a few unpaid workers? Posted by John Donovan: 24 March 2024

In a move that can only be described as “strategic retreat” (or, let’s be honest, “run for the hills”), Royal Dutch Shell has evacuated around 60 foreign staff from Iraq’s Basra Gas Company. But don’t worry, folks, Shell assures us that this sudden exodus is merely a security measure, prompted by a teensy-weensy protest over delayed pay. Because when in doubt, evacuate, right?

The fun began when workers at Basra Gas Company (BGC) decided they were tired of waiting for their paychecks to arrive. In a move that Shell probably didn’t anticipate during their morning coffee, these brave souls took to the streets to demand what’s rightfully theirs. And what did Shell do in response? They promptly packed their bags and flew their foreign staff out of the country faster than you can say “employee satisfaction.”

But fear not, for Shell wants us to know that everything is perfectly fine. In fact, they’re working remotely now, because apparently, you can solve all your problems from the comfort of your own home, even if that home happens to be thousands of miles away from the protest zone.

Of course, Shell wants to reassure us that this whole debacle won’t affect production. Because who needs workers on the ground when you can just phone it in, right? Plus, it’s not like delayed paychecks and disgruntled employees could possibly impact morale or productivity. Nope, not at all.

But wait, there’s more! Shell is also working tirelessly with their Iraqi state partner to resolve this little pay hiccup. Because when your employees are protesting in the streets, the best course of action is obviously to send them a strongly worded email and hope for the best.

In the meantime, Iraqi officials are scrambling to keep the peace and assure us that everything is under control. After all, what’s a little protest between friends, right? As long as the oil keeps flowing and the profits keep rolling in, who cares about a few unpaid workers?

So, here’s to Shell, the master of swift exits and remote work solutions. Because when the going gets tough, the tough get going… preferably to a place with better pay and happier workers.

DISCLAIMER: Content published on this non-commercial advert-free platform may incorporate information generated by Artificial Intelligence (AI) and various other technological means, including translation and information published on Wikipedia. The articles presented may be satirical adaptations derived from one or more previously published sources, crafted to maintain factual accuracy while incorporating elements of satire. Individuals or entities mentioned in our articles are encouraged to notify us of any inaccuracies that may require rectification. Readers are advised to verify all information for accuracy and completeness independently. Any actions taken based on this content are at your own risk. Shell’s Great Escape: Fleeing Protests with the Efficiency of a Greased Pig was first posted on March 24, 2024 at 5:47 pm.
©2018 "Royal Dutch Shell Plc .com". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement. Please contact me at john@shellnews.net

Ecuadorian human rights organization denounces criminalization of anti-mining protest

Mining.Com - Sun, 03/24/2024 - 09:30

Ecuador’s Ecumenical Human Rights Commission (CEDHU) issued statements this week denouncing the criminalization of anti-mining protests by law enforcement agents.

One of the statements blasted a recent decision by the Criminal Court of the Andean Bolívar province, which sentenced six environmental activists to three years in prison and to pay a fine of $4,600 for illicit association against the Curipamba – El Domo mining project.

The copper-gold project, located in the Las Naves canton, is being developed by Curimining S.A., a joint venture between Canada’s Adventus Mining (TSX-V: ADZN) and Salazar Resources (TSX-V: SRL). The miner obtained an environmental permit from the Ministry of Environment, Water and Ecological Transition of Ecuador back in January, after 27 months of paperwork and consultations.

Since Curimining was behind the complaint against the six activists, CEDHU’s communiqué criticized what it called the “abusive use of criminal law” to punish the actions of Indigenous and farming groups pushing to protect communities’ water resources, nature and human rights.

“This has become a systematic modus operandi of the Ecuadorian State which, instead of creating a protection system that guarantees the legitimate right to defend human rights, enables and even promotes this type of abusive practices that hinder the actions of community leaders, Montubias and farmers,” the brief states.

In a different communiqué that echoes a series of complaints posted over social media by the Confederation of Indigenous Nationalities of Ecuador (Conaie), CEDHU criticized that 70 people from the rural communities of Las Pampas and Palo Quemado, in the central Cotopaxi province, were charged with terrorism for protesting against an environmental consultation related to Canadian miner Atico Mining’s (TSX-V: ATY) La Plata project.

According to the Ecumenical Human Rights Commission, the problem started on March 10, when shock groups arrived in the Palo Quemando and Las Pampas communities to intimidate farming families and quash any opposition to the mining project.

The charges against the locals were laid after a series of confrontations between the two sides and the police, which took place in the context of the consultation related to La Plata and promoted by the Daniel Noboa government and the National Confederation of Farming Councils of Ecuador.

“Calling it ‘terrorism’ is a strategy used by pro-mining groups, people and companies to criminalize social organizations and defenders who do not want mining projects in their territories,” the NGO’s release reads. “This strategy has disastrous consequences on the life projects of entire families because it exposes farmers, who are not criminals and seek a dignified future for their families, to a complex and distant judicial system and a prison system plagued with corruption and violence.”

CEDHU recalled that the Constitutional Court declared unconstitutional a similar consultation advanced by the Ministry of Environment in November 2023 with the backing of a decree issued by former President Guillermo Lasso.

Both Cuniming and Atico were contacted for comment but did not respond by publication time.

Scientists discover origin of corrosion in 3D-printed stainless steel

Mining.Com - Sun, 03/24/2024 - 06:35

Researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory delved into the mysterious world of pitting corrosion in additively manufactured (3D-printed) stainless steel 316L in seawater and discovered that the key players in this corrosion drama are tiny particles called “slags.”

Stainless steel 316L is a popular choice for marine applications due to its combination of mechanical strength and corrosion resistance. This holds even more true after 3D printing, but even this resilient material isn’t immune to pitting corrosion.

Slags are produced by deoxidizers such as manganese and silicon. In traditional stainless steel 316L manufacturing, these elements are typically added before casting to bind with oxygen and form a solid phase in the molten liquid metal that can be easily removed post-manufacturing.

The LLNL researchers found these slags also form during laser powder bed fusion (LPBF) 3D printing but remain at the metal’s surface and initiate pitting corrosion.

“Pitting corrosion is extremely difficult to understand due to its stochastic nature, but we determined the material characteristics that cause or initiate this type of corrosion,” Shohini Sen-Britain, lead author of the Nature Communications paper that presents the findings, said in a media statement.

3D-printing steel.

 

“While our slags looked different than what had been observed in conventionally manufactured materials, we hypothesized that they could be a cause of pitting corrosion in 316L,” Sen-Britain said.

“We confirmed this by taking advantage of the impressive materials characterization suite and modelling capabilities we have at LLNL, where we were able to prove without a doubt that slags were the cause. This was extremely rewarding.”

While slags can also form during traditional stainless steel manufacturing, they’re typically removed with chipping hammers, grinders, or other tools. In the scientists’ view, however, those post-processing options would defeat the purpose of additive manufacturing the metal.

Zooming in on slags

The team used a combination of advanced techniques, including plasma-focused ion beam milling, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy on AM stainless steel components.

They were able to zoom in on the slags and uncover their role in the corrosion process in a simulated ocean environment, finding they created discontinuities and allowed the chloride-rich water to penetrate the steel and wreak havoc. Additionally, the slags contain metal inclusions that dissolve when exposed to the seawater-like environment, further contributing to the corrosion process.

“We wanted to do a deep-dive microscopy study to figure out what could potentially be responsible for corrosion when it does happen in these materials, and if that’s the case, then there may be additional ways of improving them by avoiding that particular agent,” Brandon Wood, the project’s principal investigator, said.

“There is a secondary phase that is formed that contains manganese—these slags—that appeared to be what was most responsible. Our team did some additional detailed microscopy looking at the neighbourhood of those slags, and sure enough, we were able to show that in that neighbourhood, you have enhancement—a secondary indicator that this is probably the dominant agent.”

Using transmission electron microscopy, the researchers selectively lifted small samples of 3D-printed stainless steel from the surface—about a few microns—to visualize the slags through the microscope and analyze their chemistry and structure at atomic resolution.

Keeping an eye on corrosion

The characterization techniques helped shed light on the complex interplay of factors that lead to pitting corrosion and enabled the team to analyze slags in ways never done before in AM.

“During the process, you locally melt the material with the laser, and then it solidifies very rapidly,” lead investigator Thomas Voisin said. “The rapid cooling freezes the material in a non-equilibrium state; you’re basically keeping the atoms in a configuration that is not supposed to be, and you’re changing the mechanical and corrosion properties of the material.”

Voisin pointed out that keeping an eye on corrosion is very important when working with stainless steel because it is used in marine applications.

“You could have the best material with the best mechanical properties, but if it cannot be in contact with seawater, this is going to restrict the applications significantly,” he said.

The group noted that this study marks a significant step forward in the ongoing battle against corrosion, not only deepening scientific understanding of corrosion processes but also paving the way for developing improved materials and manufacturing techniques.

By unravelling the mechanisms behind the slags and their relationship to pitting corrosion, engineers and manufacturers can strive to create stainless steel components that are not only strong and durable but also highly resistant to the corrosive forces of seawater, with implications extending beyond the realm of marine applications and into other industries and kinds of harsh environments.

Now that the team understands the causes behind pitting, Sen-Britain and Voisin said the next steps to enhancing the performance and longevity of 3D-printed stainless steel 316L would be altering the formulation of the powder feedstock to remove manganese and silicon to limit or eliminate slag formation.

Shell’s “Oops, We Flared Again” Excuse Raises Eyebrows and Air Quality Concerns

Royal Dutch Shell Plc .com - Sat, 03/23/2024 - 12:02
So, as the flames dance merrily in the night sky, let’s raise a toast to Shell and its impeccable track record of putting profits over people. Because when it comes to corporate accountability, Shell’s motto seems to be: “Oops, we flared again, but don’t worry, it’s just business as usual.”

Posted by John Donovan: 23 March 2024

In a move that surprises absolutely no one, Shell Chemicals’ facility in Deer Park has treated nearby residents to yet another dazzling display of environmental irresponsibility. But fear not, dear citizens, for Shell has a perfectly reasonable explanation for this week-long flare extravaganza—it’s all because of a drumroll power outage! Yes, apparently, even multi-billion-dollar corporations can’t escape the occasional blackout.

Residents in the vicinity of Shell’s chemical facility were graced with the sight of a flaming beacon of corporate negligence, with Shell generously informing them that they can expect this fiery spectacle to last for a delightful four to seven days. Because who needs fireworks when you have flares burning off excess chemicals, am I right?

But while Shell is busy reassuring everyone that there’s no cause for concern and that they totally have everything under control, Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo isn’t buying it. In a move that should surprise precisely no one, she’s side-eyeing Shell’s flaring fiasco with all the skepticism it deserves. After all, when your neighborhood is essentially turned into a mini-Hell Park, you tend to start asking questions.

Judge Hidalgo isn’t just concerned about the dazzling light show disrupting her beauty sleep; she’s worried about the sheer amount of chemicals being released and the duration of this fiery spectacle. And rightly so! But Shell, being the responsible corporate citizen that it is, has graciously declined to provide specific details about the chemicals being unleashed upon the unsuspecting populace. Who needs transparency when you have profits to protect?

And let’s not forget about Amnesty International’s scathing report, which essentially labeled areas surrounding the Houston Ship Channel as sacrificial lambs to the petrochemical industry. But hey, sacrifices must be made in the name of progress, right? Who cares about devastating health consequences and human rights violations when there’s money to be made?

So, as the flames dance merrily in the night sky, let’s raise a toast to Shell and its impeccable track record of putting profits over people. Because when it comes to corporate accountability, Shell’s motto seems to be: “Oops, we flared again, but don’t worry, it’s just business as usual.”

DISCLAIMER: Content published on this non-commercial advert-free platform may incorporate information generated by Artificial Intelligence (AI) and various other technological means, including translation and information published on Wikipedia. The articles presented may be satirical adaptations derived from one or more previously published sources, crafted to maintain factual accuracy while incorporating elements of satire. Individuals or entities mentioned in our articles are encouraged to notify us of any inaccuracies that may require rectification. Readers are advised to verify all information for accuracy and completeness independently. Any actions taken based on this content are at your own risk. Shell’s “Oops, We Flared Again” Excuse Raises Eyebrows and Air Quality Concerns was first posted on March 23, 2024 at 8:02 pm.
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Shell’s Air Pollution Permit Countdown: Tick-Tock, Time’s Up, Big Oil!

Royal Dutch Shell Plc .com - Sat, 03/23/2024 - 11:43
…who needs clean air when you can have profit margins as thick as the smog hanging over Shell’s conscience?

Posted by John Donovan 23 March 2024

In a surprising turn of events that may have Shell executives sweating more than just crude oil, the Pennsylvania Dept. of Environmental Protection (DEP) has issued a stern “get your act together” notice to the Shell ethane cracker plant. Essentially, they’ve slapped Shell with a deadline and said, “You’re time is up.” Yes, you read that correctly—apparently, even government agencies have given up on proper grammar when dealing with oil giants.

The clock is ticking, folks. Shell’s beloved cracker plant has a measly 120 days from February 22nd (until June 21st) to file for a federal Title V Operating Permit for air emissions. And let’s be real here, if Shell doesn’t even bother to file for the permit, it’s lights out until they do. Can you imagine the horror? The world’s climate crisis might momentarily catch a break from Shell’s relentless emissions. Miracles do happen.

But don’t hold your breath (pun intended), because we all know Shell is the master of wriggling out of environmental regulations faster than you can say “greenwashing.” After all, who needs clean air when you can have profit margins as thick as the smog hanging over Shell’s conscience?

So, let’s watch with bated breath as Shell scrambles to meet this deadline. Will they file for the permit in a timely manner, or will they pull out their usual bag of tricks, including lobbying, PR spin, and possibly sacrificing a few trees to appease the climate gods? Stay tuned, folks. The saga of Shell’s environmental irresponsibility continues, one permit application at a time.

DISCLAIMER: Content published on this non-commercial advert-free platform may incorporate information generated by Artificial Intelligence (AI) and various other technological means, including translation and information published on Wikipedia. The articles presented may be satirical adaptations derived from one or more previously published sources, crafted to maintain factual accuracy while incorporating elements of satire. Individuals or entities mentioned in our articles are encouraged to notify us of any inaccuracies requiring rectification. Readers are advised to verify all information for accuracy and completeness independently. Any actions taken based on this content are at your own risk. Shell’s Air Pollution Permit Countdown: Tick-Tock, Time’s Up, Big Oil! was first posted on March 23, 2024 at 7:43 pm.
©2018 "Royal Dutch Shell Plc .com". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement. Please contact me at john@shellnews.net

Prevention is the solution to the mining industry’s most common injuries and ailments

Mining.Com - Fri, 03/22/2024 - 15:05

Mining remains one of the most hazardous industries with fatalities per 100,000 workers in the US alone reaching 16.6 in 2022, making it the second-most fatal industry that year, compared to 14.1 per 100,000 in transportation and warehousing, 9.6 in construction and 2.6 in manufacturing.

Each worksite presents its own unique challenges and requirements, but injuries and ailments occur across the 12,563 active mines in the United States. While injuries and ailments can be common, prevention through correct medical provisioning and education has thankfully seen fatalities decreasing year after year. Nevertheless, accidents are incredibly disruptive to the workforce; they halt precious production time, incur significant cost, and can have a life-changing effect on those involved, and so ensuring the right preventative measures are in place is crucial.

With a wealth of experience in providing medical and safety assistance, RMI’s specialist teams support mines and mine operators in the most unique and remote locations in the world, utilising years of expertise to deliver medical provision that keeps workers safe, preventing injury or delay.

Strains, sprains, and physical ailments

Mining is a physically demanding profession, and strains, sprains, and fractures are the most commonly reported work-related injuries. Treatment of these injuries can require extensive provision of care and workers undergoing treatment can be away from site for lengthy periods of time while they recover. Absence from work can prove costly, particularly in a time where production targets are increasing.

Treating injuries and ailments when they have already taken place on mining sites can be incredibly costly, and many operators are already investing in preventative measures to minimise the risks of illness or injury. One way that employers can do this is to facilitate a pre-screening process to save operations from potential disruption: workers with pre-exiting illnesses or other health factors can lead to increased risks for themselves, their teams, and have the potential to cause delays in operations due to sickness or injury.

On-site clinics provide occupational health and deliver preventative safety advice. The benefits of operating on-site clinics far outweigh the costs, with studies showing that on-site clinics reported a 70% reduction in employee downtime and a 64% reduction in medical care costs, indicating that on-site support should be considered an essential aspect of any project.

Standard first aid training only equips workers to render basic stabilizing care for a handful of life and limb threatening emergencies, whereas RMI’s on-site medical providers have a far greater level of training and experience, allowing them to deliver a higher level of care in both emergent and non-emergent situations.

Non-occupational health

Physical injuries are just one risk to workers during mining operations. Many of the ailments that mining companies need to be aware of take place outside of the work environment. Living in confined, close quarters means illness can spread quickly throughout the workforce, which can cause downtime in production and operation.

Research has also bought into focus how mentally challenging people find working in the mining industry, due primarily to the shift working patterns, distance, and isolation from family. While open discussions around mental health have only recently come to the forefront in the industry, many operators have worked hard to remove the stigma around the issue. Addressing and managing the mental health of the mining workforce will be an ongoing process and there are still widely reported incidences of workers self-medicating with excessive alcohol and/or recreational drug consumption, creating a dangerous environment for them and their colleagues.

Being prepared to deal with situations outside of physical injuries is paramount in ensuring worker safety. Through the use of an on-site medical clinic, RMI’s medics are trained to provide a full medical examination of staff before they can begin work; this includes alcohol and drug testing as standard and acts as a deterrent for staff. Having a trained medical expert as part of the onsite team can also improve the effectiveness of illness prevention education, including educating workers on the importance being up to date with their vaccinations and maintaining good hygiene practices to prevent illnesses from spreading among workforces.

RMI’s experienced medical teams also provide telemedicine and case management support which gives staff access to around-the-clock medical consultations and advice. These provisions help to limit the need for workers to be transported to facilities off-site, helping the mine to continue running efficiently while also providing staff with a level of care that goes above and beyond the basic need.

Emergency response

Even with the best preventative measures in place, being prepared for medical emergencies is essential. All mining sites, including those located within reach of a hospital, should have a regularly reviewed Medical Emergency Response Plan (MERP).

This plan outlines the medical referral facilities and their respective capabilities to treat a wide variety of health emergencies. The plan also specifies how to transport patients to these places, which could be either by road or by air. Emergency plans are common across most mining companies but having a robust procedure with integrated medical support can help swiftly deal with a time sensitive emergency situation.

Injuries not only halt production in busy mines but they also significantly affect workers who, if not treated properly or feel their injury could have been prevented, will find work elsewhere. Incorporating sufficient medical care is an essential cost that prevents downtime, ensures the safety of workers, and improves worker retention. With the help of RMI, operators have been able to embed medical expertise into their teams helping to reduce the consequences of illness-related absences and tackle the unique challenge of working in remote locations.

(Chris Murff is vice president of global sales at RMI)

Video: Wheaton Precious Metals’ Randy Smallwood on ‘most active deal-making year’

Mining.Com - Fri, 03/22/2024 - 12:02

Wheaton Precious Metals (TSX: WPM; NYSE: WPM; LSE: WPM) is celebrating one of its most active deal-making years, clinching eight transactions with over $1 billion in commitments over roughly the past 12 months, says president and CEO Randy Smallwood.

He says the current deal-making environment has worsened, lamenting a diminished availability of high-quality projects meeting the team’s investment criteria. He suggests the industry’s chronic underinvestment in exploration and development for new mines is partly to blame.

Smallwood also outlines in an interview during a recent industry event in Toronto with The Northern Miner’s western editor, Henry Lazenby, how Wheaton plans to achieve its long-term objective of reaching and maintaining over 850,000 gold-equivalent oz. of yearly production.

Watch the full video here:

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