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Sandbrook Capital Commits $460M to rPlus Energies

Solar Industry Magazine - Thu, 02/22/2024 - 16:18

rPlus Energies has announced a platform-level partnership with Sandbrook Capital, in which Sandbrook will invest up to $460 million in the company alongside continued support from rPlus founding investor Gardner Group.

rPlus’ 15 GW pipeline of renewable projects will be facilitated by Sandbrook’s initial commitment, enabling the company to bring an expected 1 GW of storage online in the near-term while advancing the pipeline balance.

“From the outset, it was evident that we share an execution-oriented and community-minded approach to business and project development,” says Luigi Resta, rPlus president and CEO. “The expertise, commitment and drive of the Sandbrook team, coupled with the Gardner Group’s continued leadership, will play a pivotal role in steering substantial growth as rPlus makes a strategic transition to own-and-operate for the long-term.”

Lazard Frères & Co. served as financial advisor to rPlus. Foley & Lardner served as transaction counsel to rPlus. Kirkland & Ellis served as transaction counsel to Sandbrook. Parr Brown Gee & Loveless served as transaction counsel to Gardner Group.

The post Sandbrook Capital Commits $460M to rPlus Energies appeared first on Solar Industry.

Sandbrook Capital Commits $460M to rPlus Energies

North American Windpower - Thu, 02/22/2024 - 16:17

rPlus Energies has announced a platform-level partnership with Sandbrook Capital, in which Sandbrook will invest up to $460 million in the company alongside continued support from rPlus founding investor Gardner Group.

rPlus’ 15 GW pipeline of renewable projects will be facilitated by Sandbrook’s initial commitment, enabling the company to bring an expected 1 GW of storage online in the near term while advancing the pipeline balance.

“From the outset, it was evident that we share an execution-oriented and community-minded approach to business and project development,” says Luigi Resta, rPlus president and CEO. “The expertise, commitment and drive of the Sandbrook team, coupled with the Gardner Group’s continued leadership, will play a pivotal role in steering substantial growth as rPlus makes a strategic transition to own-and-operate for the long-term.”

Lazard Frères & Co served as financial advisor to rPlus. Foley & Lardner served as transaction counsel to rPlus. Kirkland & Ellis served as transaction counsel to Sandbrook. Parr Brown Gee & Loveless served as transaction counsel to Gardner Group.

The post Sandbrook Capital Commits $460M to rPlus Energies appeared first on North American Windpower.

Polaris Signs VPPA with Enel for Fence Post Solar+Storage

Solar Industry Magazine - Thu, 02/22/2024 - 16:13

Enel North America and Polaris have started operations at Enel’s Fence Post Solar+Storage project, a 297 MW PV and 86 MW storage system installation located in Navarro County, Texas. 

The project is supported by a 12-year VPPA. Polaris will purchase the electricity and associated RECs generated by a 22 MW portion of Fence Post Solar, matching approximately 40% of the company’s U.S. electrical use.

“Polaris shares Enel’s mission to bring more clean energy onto the grid,” says Stephen Pike, head of Enel North America’s renewable energy production business, Enel Green Power North America.

“Across all sectors, leaders like Polaris are stepping up to secure the economic and environmental benefits of renewable energy. Enel offers the clean and flexible solutions businesses need to advance their sustainability goals.”

The solar project began operations in December, while the battery storage system is complete and undergoing final commissioning. 

Coho Climate Advisors advised Polaris on this VPPA and supported the company in its project selection, analysis, negotiations and deal execution.

The post Polaris Signs VPPA with Enel for Fence Post Solar+Storage appeared first on Solar Industry.

Iron ore boom of the 2000s repeating – this time with critical metals

Mining.Com - Thu, 02/22/2024 - 16:03

A headline published in The Age back in July 2003 reads: “[Andrew] Forrest has a grand $1.2bn plan for tiny Perth mining company.” 

That company was called Allied Mining and Processing and you’ve probably never heard of it. But from small roots this tiny outfit grew into one of Australia’s largest listed companies with a market cap exceeding A$88 billion. 

Twenty years ago, Andrew (Twiggy) Forrest renamed this micro-cap stock to Fortescue Metals Group (ASX: FMG)The rest is history, but it was quite the story behind Twiggy’s road to immense wealth. 

Fortescue was perhaps the single biggest success story from the last mining boom. A stock that grew from a measly A2¢ per share back in 2003 to more than $10 a share just five years later. 

It seems absurd, but that’s around a 50,000% return. 

Junior iron ore miners were the poster child from the early 2000s China-led commodity rush. However, it wasn’t a smooth road to success.  

You see, back in 2003, Forrest was looking to break into the monopolized iron ore market, a sector dominated by mining giants Rio Tinto (NYSE: RIO; LSE: RIO; ASX: RIO) and BHP (NYSE: BHP; LSE: BHP; ASX: BHP). 

At the time, his ambitious venture was mocked by analysts and journalists. 

Accessing cash to build a capital-intensive iron ore operation was near impossible in the early 2000’s. Sure, iron ore mining in Australia is relatively cheap and relatively easy to extract. Simply load rock on a boat and ship it to China’s massive steel refineries.  But few consider the vast infrastructure required to get to that point. Iron ore is a bulky commodity. 

Mine feasibility studies must include costs that extend well beyond the mining operation: railways, ports, loading facilities. It’s this barrier to entry that enabled the majors to retain their grip over iron ore supply in Australia. Yet these challenges didn’t deter Forrest. 

Similar to today’s evolving energy transition story, China was emerging as a powerful source of demand for iron ore. In 2003, the country’s GDP was surging at around 9% per year. But few predicted this growth would continue, and fewer still could have comprehended the incredible trajectory of iron ore prices over the next five years.  

In 2003, the global economy was reeling from a tech bust and terrorist attacks, with iron ore prices sitting below $20 per tonne. 

History repeating?

2023 was a terrible year for most commodities — especially those tied to the renewable energy trend. That’s despite investment in renewable energies hitting an all-time high in 2023 at $1.8 trillion. 

According to BloombergNEF that was up 17% from 2022. Yet, junior mining stocks have endured back-to-back years of underperformance. 

But while the mainstream narrative turns bearish on critical metal stocks, the world’s most liquid insiders continue to build exposure. That includes mining tycoons Andrew Forrest, Gina Rinehart and Robert Friedland. 

These heavyweights are still long on the critical metals mega-theme.  

Have no doubt, the spoils will go to those who are able to stick with these gargantuan commodity trends. Twenty years ago, that was iron ore: a commodity that was slow to respond to China’s rampant growth before a massive takeoff. 

By 2005, iron ore prices had almost tripled reaching $50 per tonne. Three years later and the price was hovering just below $200 per tonne — almost a 10-fold surge in five years. 

Liquidity challenges stalling new mines

Ultimately, higher iron ore prices turned Andrew Forrest’ iron ore ambitions into reality, despite steep development costs. 

Which brings us back to today’s market. In a case of history rhyming, critical metal developers sit at the edge of enormous opportunity. It’s why I like to say critical metals stocks are the iron ore developers from 2003. 

Sitting at the precipice of a major upward leg in the commodity cycle — yet hobbled by enormous cost of capital required to get projects underway. 

Just like it did with iron ore in the early 2000s, expect downbeat sentiment to shift rapidly in line with rising prices. 

This is how commodity cycles work. This is how inconceivable capex finds its way into new projects. But don’t take my word for it — watch the world’s biggest insiders and follow their lead. 

James Cooper runs the commodities investment service Diggers and Drillers. You can follow him on X @JCooperGeo.

Oceantic Network Forms West Coast Supplier Council

North American Windpower - Thu, 02/22/2024 - 15:59

Oceantic Network has organized the West Coast Supplier Council, focused on the development of the region’s offshore wind sector and supply chain. 

Using the knowledge and experience of network members in the West Coast supply chain, the council will focus on supply chain perspectives and expertise, and their inclusion in state and federal planning processes covering the West Coast. 

“The West Coast is at a critical stage in its offshore wind development, and we look forward to encouraging its sustainable and intentional growth,” says John Begala, vice president of federal and state policy at Oceantic Network. 

“We are fortunate to have assembled a strong collection of companies with the experience and capabilities to get projects delivered on time and on budget. These are the businesses that will serve as the backbone of a robust offshore wind supply chain, with potential to employ countless workers at a competitive wage.” 

The West Coast Supplier Council is made up of companies that act as OEMs, EPC firms and Tier 1 suppliers. Additionally, the companies serving as founding members of the council have all delivered components to at least one full-scale offshore wind project operating globally or under construction in the U.S. 

The council will work with all major stakeholders on West Coast sector development, including project developers, labor unions, policymakers, port authorities and environmental advocates. 

Founding members of the West Coast Supplier Council include Aker Solutions, Burns & McDonnell, Crowley Wind Services, Foss Offshore Wind and Hellenic Cables.

The post Oceantic Network Forms West Coast Supplier Council appeared first on North American Windpower.

Clearway Energy Group Completes 452 MW Solar Development

Solar Industry Magazine - Thu, 02/22/2024 - 15:53

Clearway Energy Group has completed its 452 MW Texas Solar Nova complex in Kent County, Texas, constructed in two phases. 

“We are incredibly grateful for our partnerships with local officials, suppliers, construction partners and customers that made this project possible,” says Valerie Wooley, SVP of origination at Clearway.

“The Texas Solar Nova complex is delivering new renewable power to the ERCOT grid, thanks to the ongoing dedication of our partners. We thank Verizon, SKF and Toyota Boshoku America, among others, for partnering with Clearway to help meet their own decarbonization goals.”

Clearway’s Texas Solar Nova offtake agreements support Citizen Verizon, Verizon’s business plan for economic, environmental and social advancement.

A portion of the renewable attributes from the projects, built on approximately 5,000 acres of land with more than 1.1 million solar panels, will also go toward supporting SKF and Toyota Boshoku America. Clearway and its construction partner, Mortenson, supported several local organizations during construction.

In connection with the construction and operation of these facilities, Clearway assembled a bank consortium consisting of Natixis, DNB, MUFG, NordLB and Societe Generale for a total of approximately $700 million of construction financing commitments and $182 million of term loan commitments. The company arranged tax equity for the project, as well as cash equity from HASI in partnership with Clearway Energy.

The post Clearway Energy Group Completes 452 MW Solar Development appeared first on Solar Industry.

SUWA Statement on the Release of the San Rafael Swell Travel Management Plan Preliminary Alternatives – 2.23.24

Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance - Thu, 02/22/2024 - 15:23

February 23, 2024
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

SUWA Statement on the release of the San Rafael Swell Travel Management Plan Preliminary Alternatives – 2.23.24 

Contacts: 
Stephen Bloch, Legal Director, Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance (SUWA); (steve@suwa.org)
Grant Stevens, Communications Director, Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance (SUWA); (319) 427-0260 (grant@suwa.org)

Salt Lake City, UT – Yesterday, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) released preliminary alternatives for the San Rafael Swell motorized vehicle Travel Management Plan. Below is a statement from SUWA Legal Director Stephen Bloch and additional information. 

“The San Rafael Swell is an iconic and much-visited southern Utah landscape — one where it’s critical that the BLM restore balance between motorized and non-motorized users. The Swell should be known for its spectacular views, cultural sites, and opportunities for solitude. We look forward to reviewing the preliminary alternatives and encouraging our members to speak up and make their voices heard.  —Stephen Bloch, SUWA Legal Director.

Additional Information: 

The San Rafael Swell Travel Management Area (TMA) encompasses roughly 1,150,000 acres of BLM-managed lands within the Price and Richfield field offices. A beloved backcountry area, the Swell is home to irreplaceable cultural and historical resources, important wildlife habitat, and abundant recreation opportunities. The Swell’s sinuous slot canyons, soaring redrock cliffs, and prominent buttes provide endless enjoyment for hikers, canyoneers, campers, river runners, climbers, bikers, photographers, and other visitors. It also encompasses recently-designated wilderness areas and the San Rafael Swell Recreation Area

The preliminary alternatives provide an initial look at the different route networks the BLM will eventually analyze as part of a draft environmental assessment, allowing the public to weigh in as the agency is drafting a new travel plan.

The San Rafael Swell Travel Management Plan is one of eleven travel plans the BLM is completing over the next few years as part of a court-supervised settlement agreement between the agency, conservation, and off-road vehicle groups. Covering more than 6 million acres of BLM-managed lands in eastern and southern Utah, these plans will determine where motorized vehicles will be allowed on some of Utah’s wildest public lands. To date, the BLM has completed three of the eleven plans. Read more about SUWA’s litigation to ensure these travel plans follow federal laws to protect public lands and resources.

 

 

The post SUWA Statement on the Release of the San Rafael Swell Travel Management Plan Preliminary Alternatives – 2.23.24 appeared first on Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance.

Categories: G2. Local Greens

Our Favorite Fascinating Bird Behaviors From the 2023 Audubon Photo Awards

Audubon Society - Thu, 02/22/2024 - 15:02
Bird photography can serve many purposes. The perfect portrait might make us appreciate the sheer splendor of avian beauty. A compelling perspective, meanwhile, can shine a light on conservation...
Categories: G3. Big Green

Hochschild pours first gold at Mara Rosa mine in Brazil

Mining.Com - Thu, 02/22/2024 - 14:31

Hochschild Mining (LSE: HOC) this week achieved first gold pour at its Mara Rosa mine in Brazil. The London-based miner operates three gold mines in Peru and Argentina: Inmaculada, San Jose and Pallancata. Mara Rosa is its first Brazilian operation, located in the state of Goias.

The project remains on schedule with commercial production expected towards the end of the second quarter of 2024, the company said, adding that Mara Rosa is expected to produce between 83,000 to 93,000 ounces of gold in 2024 at an all-in sustaining cost of between $1,090 and $1,120 per ounce.

Hochschild said Mara Rosa will provide near-term production at a significantly lower cost, with strong potential to find additional resources through the  brownfield exploration program.

First gold at Mara Rosa. Image from Hochschild Mining.

Based on a NI 43-101 Pre-Feasibility Study in 2018, the Posse Deposit at Mara Rosa contains estimated 513,000 ounces of gold in the proven category from 9.6 Mt at 1.65 g/t Au, and 574,000 ounces gold in the probable category from 14.2 Mt at 1.26 g/t Au, for total estimated reserves of 1,087,000 ounces from 23.8 Mt at 1.42 g/t Au. 

“We are all very proud of the team for delivering Brazil’s newest gold mine,” CEO Eduardo Landin said in the statement. “Mara Rosa will be a low-cost operation that will create significant value for all our stakeholders. The first pour is testament to the hard work done by all our employees, contractors and local communities who have enabled us to construct this exciting operation on schedule and on budget.

“We are now focusing on completing the ramp up of the processing plant to achieve commercial production. In addition, our brownfield team is continuing its programme to further grow the resource base at a number of targets in the region,” Landin said.

Farmers Ask for Stability in Milk Prices

National Farmers Union - Thu, 02/22/2024 - 14:10

The American Farm Bureau Federation and National Farmers Union sent a letter today requesting that USDA bring stability to Class I milk prices. The letter, sent jointly by AFBF President Zippy Duvall and NFU President Rob Larew, asks Secretary Tom Vilsack to issue an interim final decision to return the Class I mover formula to […]

The post Farmers Ask for Stability in Milk Prices first appeared on National Farmers Union.

Categories: A3. Agroecology

California Department of Water Resources files petition to change Delta water rights despite civil rights investigation by the US EPA

Restore The San Francisco Bay Area Delta - Thu, 02/22/2024 - 14:00

Governor Newsom’s pro tunnel agenda raises concerns over discriminatory practices in Delta management

For Immediate Release:

February 22, 2024

Contact: Alexandra Nagy, alexandra@sunstonestrategies.org, 818-633-0865

Sacramento, Calif. — The Department of Water Resources (DWR) under the Newsom Administration announced today that it has submitted a petition to the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) to change water rights for implementation of the Delta Conveyance Project, also known as the Delta tunnel, despite the SWRCB being under investigation by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for a Title VI Civil Rights complaint. 

The complaint, filed by the Delta Tribal Environmental Coalition (DTEC), comprised of the Shingle Springs Band of Miwok Indians, the Winnemem Wintu Tribe, Buena Vista Rancheria, Restore the Delta, and Little Manila Rising, was accepted by the EPA in August 2022. The complaint outlines the SWRCB’s discriminatory mismanagement of water quality in the San Francisco Bay/Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta watershed as well as the disparate impacts of the state’s failure to regulate the Delta watershed on the surrounding community. Notably, it requests the completion of the Bay-Delta Water Quality Plan before the SWRCB considers the change in the point of diversion for the Delta tunnel.

The EPA accepted DTEC Coalition’s complaint for investigation, engaging with DTEC and the SWRCB in two related processes for resolution.

The DWR petition proposes two points of diversion and rediversion to water rights for construction of the tunnel, however, it fails to disclose the Title VI Civil Rights complaint and the current investigation.

Barbara Barrigan-Parrilla, Executive Director of Restore the Delta, expressed disappointment with DWR’s filing with the State Water Resources Control Board. She stated, “DWR, speaking on behalf of the State Water Resources Control Board’s actions while our petition for relief is under investigation with the US EPA, reveals the lack of proper regulatory distance between the Newsom Administration’s pro-tunnel agenda and State regulators tasked with protecting and considering impacts on all water users and related parties throughout the state.”

Barrigan-Parrilla pointed out that DWR has overlooked significant concerns of Delta environmental justice communities and tribes in its Environmental Impact Report for the project. This is especially concerning given DWR’s claim that the tunnel will address water challenges for all environmental justice communities and tribes, revealing the divide and conquer tactics being used by the Newsom Administration. Barrigan-Parilla also highlighted the State Water Resource Control Board’s failure to complete and implement a Bay-Delta Plan that addresses the documented needs of Delta tribes and environmental justice communities.

“The Newsom Administration’s handling of Delta management is riddled with discriminatory practices. We are extremely disappointed in the Governor’s leadership in California water, which contradicts the image that he cultivates as a social justice leader,” concluded Barrigan-Parrilla.

The SWRCB is set to review the petition and will follow with a public notice detailing their public review process.

Categories: G2. Local Greens

Sparked by Chesapeake Cuts, Natural Gas Forwards Rally Across 2024 Strip 

NGI Shale Daily - Thu, 02/22/2024 - 13:32

A wave of bullish optimism, tied to the production cuts announced recently by Chesapeake Energy Corp., also lifted regional natural gas forwards higher during the Feb. 15-21 trading period, NGI’s Forward Look data show.

For numerous Lower 48 trading locations, the most pronounced week/week fixed price gains occurred further along the strip during the 2024 injection season. 

Chesapeake in its 4Q2024 earnings results signaled its intent to curtail activity in both the Haynesville and Marcellus shales in 2024. The latest Forward Look price trends imply a shift in the market’s thinking around balances through the remainder of the year tied to the producer’s announcement.

[Download Now: In our 2024 Natural Gas Outlook Report ‘Future In Focus’, Natural Gas Intelligence’s experienced team of Thought Leaders delve into the myriad opportunities and questions the industry faces, with a focus on market dynamics, upstream outlooks and price forecast trends that will shape the future global natural gas landscape. Learn more.]

Benchmark Henry Hub saw the largest fixed price gains for June through October of this year. July 2024 at the hub rallied 25.8 cents week/week to exit at $2.427/MMBtu.

Numerous other hubs followed Henry’s example by posting healthy increases across the middle months of the 2024 strip.

A few New England hubs, meanwhile, felt the pain of mild winter weather. Discounts for March delivery in the region came as forecasts made it increasingly difficult to envision impressive late-winter cold materializing to justify higher premiums.

Algonquin Citygate March basis plunged 34.3 cents for the period, ending at a 65.4-cent premium to Henry Hub.

Maxar’s Weather Desk as of Thursday was calling for exceptionally warm conditions to sprawl across key demand markets over the middle and eastern sections of the Lower 48 into early March.

The forecaster’s latest 11- to 15-day outlook, covering March 3-7, trended even warmer from the Interior West to the Midwest.

Warmer than normal temperatures expected over the eastern two-thirds of the Lower 48 for this timeframe would include “much aboves favoring the Midwest and East throughout the period,” Maxar said. “Temperatures also lean on the warmer side of normal in the South but less anomalously so in a stormy pattern.”

Market’s Production Response

How the market will resolve what could be a sizable storage overhang exiting winter remains a key question heading into the 2024 injection season. Considering the reaction to Chesapeake’s planned cuts, which saw the March Nymex contract rally 19.7 cents Wednesday, the market appeared eager to see producers pull back.

“In our view, notwithstanding 5.5 Bcf/d of price-induced coal-to-gas switching in the power sector, the natural gas market will ultimately require help from lower production to help balance oversupply,” EBW Analytics Group analyst Eli Rubin said in a recent note. 

A slowdown in upstream activity as indicated by the current round of earnings results “may take months to materialize,” according to Rubin. 

In the meantime, producers “may quietly narrow supply during the low-demand shoulder season,” and pipeline maintenance could also serve to curb volumes, the analyst said.

A delayed in-service date for the Mountain Valley Pipeline (MVP) is “helpful from a macro perspective but far from curative,” according to Rubin.

Appalachian Basis Weakens

Appalachian basis differentials widened somewhat during the Feb. 15-21 period, which brought news of another delay for the 2 million Dth/d MVP, now slated for completion by the end of June.

Eastern Gas South basis shed around 5-10 cents week/week across the 2024 strip and into early 2025. For April 2024, the hub finished at minus-53.2 cents, down 6.8 cents.

Still, basis differentials at points downstream in the Mid-Atlantic also came under downward pressure for the period. Transco Zone 5 April basis fell 8.5 cents to plus-13.6 cents, Forward Look data show.

As MVP inches closer to the finish line, it is perhaps worth revisiting the potential market impact as the long-delayed Appalachian takeaway pipeline finally enters service.

Analyst Sheetal Nasta in a blog post for RBN Energy LLC late last year outlined how congestion on Transco (aka the Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line) could impact the initial uplift to regional takeaway capacity afforded by MVP’s in-service.

According to Nasta, the “big questions” surrounding the pipeline’s startup are “when it will be able to flow its full 2 Bcf/d capacity and how much it will end up increasing overall Northeast takeaway capacity.”

The MVP mainline terminates at Transco’s Station 165 in Pittsylvania County, VA, the analyst noted.

“From there, MVP deliveries into Transco will depend on takeaway capacity from Station 165 in order to access premium-priced markets within Transco’s Zones 4 and 5,” Nasta said. “…Transco is the only major long-haul system supplying gas to the Atlantic corridor, and it is more or less fully contracted with firm commitments.”

The post Sparked by Chesapeake Cuts, Natural Gas Forwards Rally Across 2024 Strip  appeared first on Natural Gas Intelligence

EnergySage Report Reveals Drop in Solar Prices

Solar Industry Magazine - Thu, 02/22/2024 - 13:17

EnergySage‘s 18th semi-annual Solar & Storage Marketplace Report finds that for the first time since mid-2021, solar prices decreased on the EnergySage Marketplace, dropping by 3.5% to $2.80 per watt.

Quoted storage prices also fell by 6.4% on EnergySage in the second half of the year, decreasing for the first time since the company began tracking prices in 2020.

“The home electrification industry faced a challenging year in 2023 amidst a changing net metering landscape and persistent inflation,” says EnergySage COO Charlie Hadlow.

“However, EnergySage Marketplace data shows a turning point could be just around the corner, with consumer demand holding strong and diversifying, while solar and storage prices have decreased. The latest EnergySage report provides a unique perspective for this dynamic but resilient moment in the industry, both from the installer and homeowner perspectives.”

The report analyzes homeowner shopping transactions on EnergySage.com during 2023 for solar panels, inverters and batteries from solar companies in 41 states and Washington, D.C.

The post EnergySage Report Reveals Drop in Solar Prices appeared first on Solar Industry.

Skeptical Science New Research for Week #8 2024

Skeptical Science - Thu, 02/22/2024 - 13:15
Open access notables

Transition from positive to negative indirect CO2 effects on the vegetation carbon uptake, Chen et al., Nature Communications:

Here we investigate how the impacts of eCO2-driven climate change on growing-season gross primary production have changed globally during 1982–2014, using satellite observations and Earth system models, and evaluate their evolution until the year 2100. We show that the initial positive effect of eCO2-induced climate change on vegetation carbon uptake has declined recently, shifting to negative in the early 21st century. Such emerging pattern appears prominent in high latitudes and occurs in combination with a decrease of direct CO2 physiological effect, ultimately resulting in a sharp reduction of the current growth benefits induced by climate warming and CO2 fertilization. Such weakening of the indirect CO2 effect can be partially attributed to the widespread land drying, and it is expected to be further exacerbated under global warming.

Real-world time-travel experiment shows ecosystem collapse due to anthropogenic climate change, Li et al., Nature Communications

Predicting climate impacts is challenging and has to date relied on indirect methods, notably modeling. Here we examine coastal ecosystem change during 13 years of unusually rapid, albeit likely temporary, sea-level rise ( > 10 mm yr−1) in the Gulf of Mexico. Such rates, which may become a persistent feature in the future due to anthropogenic climate change, drove rising water levels of similar magnitude in Louisiana’s coastal wetlands. Measurements of surface-elevation change at 253 monitoring sites show that 87% of these sites are unable to keep up with rising water levels. We find no evidence for enhanced wetland elevation gain through ecogeomorphic feedbacks, where more frequent inundation would lead to enhanced biomass accumulation that could counterbalance rising water levels. We attribute this to the exceptionally rapid sea-level rise during this time period. Under the current climate trajectory (SSP2-4.5), drowning of ~75% of Louisiana’s coastal wetlands is a plausible outcome by 2070.

The importance of crowdsourced observations for urban climate services, Mitchell & Fry, International Journal of Climatology:

Crowdsourced observation networks are typically much more dense than those maintained by National Meteorological Services, and sample a much wider range of local climates. This offers an opportunity to build observed climatologies that are more representative of lived experience, particularly in cities. This study provides a worked example to show their potential for improving operational climate services, and to identify the challenges to realizing that potential. To demonstrate the concept, data from personal weather stations, obtained through citizen science, are used to build an observed record of daily maximum temperatures in 2020 in Manchester (UK). This record is compared to the standard baseline used in a current climate service, showing a substantial increase in the estimated heat hazard. If such potential benefits are to be realized in a climate service, it will be necessary to first build an alternative observed baseline of decadal length and at national or international scale. 

Widespread and increasing near-bottom hypoxia in the coastal ocean off the United States Pacific Northwest, Barth et al., Scientific Reports:

During summer 2021, an unprecedented number of ship- and underwater glider-based measurements of dissolved oxygen were made in this region. Near-bottom hypoxia, that is dissolved oxygen less than 61 µmol kg−1 and harmful to marine animals, was observed over nearly half of the continental shelf inshore of the 200-m isobath, covering 15,500 square kilometers. A mid-shelf ribbon with near-bottom, dissolved oxygen less than 50 µmol kg−1 extended for 450 km off north-central Oregon and Washington. Spatial patterns in near-bottom oxygen are related to the continental shelf width and other features of the region. Maps of near-bottom oxygen since 1950 show a consistent trend toward lower oxygen levels over time. The fraction of near-bottom water inshore of the 200-m isobath that is hypoxic on average during the summer upwelling season increases over time from nearly absent (2%) in 1950–1980, to 24% in 2009–2018, compared with 56% during the anomalously strong upwelling conditions in 2021. Widespread and increasing near-bottom hypoxia is consistent with increased upwelling-favorable wind forcing under climate change.

Offshoring emissions through used vehicle exports, Newman et al., Nature Climate Change:

Policies to reduce transport emissions often overlook the international flow of used vehicles. We quantify the rate at which used vehicles generated CO2 and pollution for all used vehicles exported from Great Britain—a globally leading used vehicle exporter—across 2005–2021. Destined for low–middle-income countries, exported vehicles fail roadworthiness standards and, even under extremely optimistic ‘functioning-as-new’ assumptions, generate at least 13–53% more emissions than scrapped or on-road vehicles.

Translating climate risk assessments into more effective adaptation decision-making: The importance of social and political aspects of place-based climate risk, Kythreotis et al., Environmental Science & Policy:

Climate risk continues to be framed ostensibly in terms of physical, socio-economic and/or ecological risks, as evidenced in the 2012 and 2017 UK Climate Change Risk Assessment (CCRA) evidence reports. This article argues that framing climate risk in this way remains problematic for the science-policy process, particularly in ensuring adequate climate risk assessment information translates into more effective adaptation decision-making. We argue how climate risk assessments need to further consider the social and political aspects of place-based climate risk to ensure more effective adaptation policy outcomes. 

From this week's government/NGO section:

Carbon Clean 200®: Investing In a Clean Energy Future 2024 Performance UpdateHeaps et al., As You Sow:

The Clean200 lists the 200 major corporate players from 35 countries around the world that are at the forefront of this [energy] transition. These are the companies that are leading the way by putting sustainability at the heart of their products, services, business models, and investments, helping to move the world onto a more sustainable trajectory. 

Agenda for a Progressive Political Economy of Carbon RemovalNawaz et al., Institute for Responsible Carbon Removal, American University:

Large amounts of carbon dioxide will need to be removed and durably stored to meet climate targets. Even the lowest estimates suggest that large new industries will need to be created to produce these removals. As both private and public investments begin to fill this gap, the foundations of an emerging carbon removal industry are now being laid via policy decisions that will shape the field to come. The authors examine the possible versions of a future with carbon removal, imagining its best forms, its worst forms, and its most likely forms. 135 articles in 66 journals by 766 contributing authors

Physical science of climate change, effects

Underlying physical mechanisms of winter precipitation extremes over India's high mountain region, Nischal et al., Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society 10.1002/qj.4661

Observations of climate change, effects

Unprecedented wildfires in Korea: Historical evidence of increasing wildfire activity due to climate change, Chang et al., Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 10.1016/j.agrformet.2024.109920

Widespread and increasing near-bottom hypoxia in the coastal ocean off the United States Pacific Northwest, Barth et al., Scientific Reports Open Access pdf 10.1038/s41598-024-54476-0

Instrumentation & observational methods of climate change, effects

Exploring Multi-decadal Time Series of Temperature Extremes in Australian Coastal Waters, Hemming et al., Earth System Science Data Open Access pdf 10.5194/essd-16-887-2024

Opinion: Aerosol remote sensing over the next 20 years, Remer et al., Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Open Access 10.5194/acp-24-2113-2024

The importance of crowdsourced observations for urban climate services, Mitchell & Fry, International Journal of Climatology Open Access pdf 10.1002/joc.8390

Modeling, simulation & projection of climate change, effects

A Simple Relationship Between the Magnitude and Spatial Extent of Global Surface Temperature Anomalies, Fried & Huybers, Geophysical Research Letters Open Access 10.1029/2023gl106537

A systematic review of regional and global climate extremes in CMIP6 models under shared socio-economic pathways, Deepa et al., Theoretical and Applied Climatology 10.1007/s00704-024-04872-3

Current and Future Patterns of Global Wildfire Based on Deep Neural Networks, Zhang et al., Earth's Future Open Access pdf 10.1029/2023ef004088

Future Changes in the Intensity and Duration of Marine Heat and Cold Waves: Insights from Coupled Model Initial-Condition Large Ensembles, Deser et al., Journal of Climate 10.1175/jcli-d-23-0278.1

Roles of External Forcing and Internal Variability in Global Marine Heatwaves Change During 1982–2021, Dong et al., Geophysical Research Letters Open Access 10.1029/2023gl107557

Simulating the Western North America heatwave of 2021 with analog importance sampling, Pons et al., Weather and Climate Extremes Open Access 10.1016/j.wace.2024.100651

Advancement of climate & climate effects modeling, simulation & projection

Assessing the sensitivity of aerosol mass budget and effective radiative forcing to horizontal grid spacing in E3SMv1 using a regional refinement approach, Li et al., Geoscientific Model Development Open Access 10.5194/gmd-17-1327-2024

Causally-Informed Deep Learning to Improve Climate Models and Projections, Iglesias?Suarez et al., Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres Open Access 10.1029/2023jd039202

Evaluation of Stratocumulus Evolution Under Contrasting Temperature Advections in CESM2 Through a Lagrangian Framework, Zhang et al., Geophysical Research Letters Open Access pdf 10.1029/2023gl106856

Global Precipitation Correction Across a Range of Climates Using CycleGAN, McGibbon et al., Geophysical Research Letters Open Access pdf 10.1029/2023gl105131

How well do Earth system models reproduce the observed aerosol response to rapid emission reductions? A COVID-19 case study, Digby et al., Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Open Access 10.5194/acp-24-2077-2024

Moist bias in the Pacific upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) in climate models affects regional circulation patterns, Ploeger et al., Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Open Access 10.5194/acp-24-2033-2024

Seasonal Prediction of Regional Arctic Sea Ice Using the High-Resolution Climate Prediction System CMA-CPSv3, Dai et al., Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres 10.1029/2023jd039148

Spatial spin-up of precipitation in limited-area convection-permitting simulations over North America using the CRCM6/GEM5.0 model, Roberge et al., Geoscientific Model Development Open Access pdf 10.5194/gmd-17-1497-2024

Uncertainties in the Projection of Dynamic Sea Level in CMIP6 and FGOALS-g3 Large Ensemble, Jin et al., Journal of Climate 10.1175/jcli-d-23-0272.1

Understanding Biases in Indian Ocean Seasonal SST in CMIP6 Models, McKenna et al., Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans Open Access pdf 10.1029/2023jc020330

Understanding of CMIP6 surface temperature cold bias over the westerly and monsoon regions of the Tibetan Plateau, Wu et al., Climate Dynamics 10.1007/s00382-024-07122-4

Cryosphere & climate change

A High-Resolution Calving Front Data Product for Marine-Terminating Glaciers in Svalbard, Li et al., Earth System Science Data Open Access pdf 10.5194/essd-16-919-2024

Atlantic Water warming increases melt below Northeast Greenland’s last floating ice tongue, Wekerle et al., Nature Communications Open Access pdf 10.1038/s41467-024-45650-z

Glacier retreat and lake outburst floods in the central Himalayan region from 2000 to 2022, Banerjee et al., Natural Hazards 10.1007/s11069-024-06415-5

Globally consistent estimates of high-resolution Antarctic ice mass balance and spatially resolved glacial isostatic adjustment, Willen et al., The Cryosphere Open Access pdf 10.5194/tc-18-775-2024

Meteoric water and glacial melt in the southeastern Amundsen Sea: a time series from 1994 to 2020, Hennig et al., The Cryosphere Open Access pdf 10.5194/tc-18-791-2024

Minimal Impact of Late-Season Melt Events on Greenland Ice Sheet Annual Motion, Ing et al., Geophysical Research Letters Open Access pdf 10.1029/2023gl106520

Sea level & climate change

Global and regional ocean mass budget closure since 2003, Ludwigsen et al., Nature Communications Open Access pdf 10.1038/s41467-024-45726-w

Real-world time-travel experiment shows ecosystem collapse due to anthropogenic climate change, Li et al., Nature Communications Open Access pdf 10.1038/s41467-024-45487-6

The Need for Multi-Century Projections of Sea Level Rise, Palmer & Weeks , Earth's Future Open Access pdf 10.1029/2023ef004403

Paleoclimate & paleogeochemistry

Oxygen rise in the tropical upper ocean during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, Moretti et al., Science Open Access pdf 10.1126/science.adh4893

Spatial patterns of Holocene temperature changes over mid-latitude Eurasia, Jiang et al., Nature Communications Open Access 10.1038/s41467-024-45883-y

The Ostracod Clumped-Isotope Thermometer: A Novel Tool to Accurately Quantify Continental Climate Changes, Marchegiano et al., Geophysical Research Letters Open Access 10.1029/2023gl107426

Biology & climate change, related geochemistry

Biparental incubation behaviour under temperature extremes in sandbank nesting black skimmers, Austad et al., Ecology and Evolution Open Access pdf 10.1002/ece3.11021

Body mass, temperature, and pathogen intensity differentially affect critical thermal maxima and their population-level variation in a solitary bee, Jones et al., Ecology and Evolution Open Access 10.1002/ece3.10945

Body size and trophic structure explain global asymmetric response of tetrapod diversity to climate effects, Gusmão et al., Ecology and Evolution Open Access pdf 10.1002/ece3.11047

Climate regulation processes are linked to the functional composition of plant communities in European forests, shrublands, and grasslands, Kambach et al., Global Change Biology Open Access 10.1111/gcb.17189

Climate-driven range shifts of Levaillant’s Woodpecker Picus vaillantii in the Western Mediterranean, Badis et al., Regional Environmental Change 10.1007/s10113-024-02185-9

Critical transitions in the Amazon forest system, Flores et al., Nature Open Access pdf 10.1038/s41586-023-06970-0

Decline of a North American rocky intertidal foundation species linked to extreme dry, downslope Santa Ana winds, Whitaker et al., Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution Open Access pdf 10.3389/fevo.2024.1291310

Developmental temperature, more than long-term evolution, defines thermal tolerance in an estuarine copepod, Ashlock et al., Ecology and Evolution Open Access 10.1002/ece3.10995

Drought resistance of major tree species in the Czech Republic, Jiang et al., Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 10.1016/j.agrformet.2024.109933

Ecological generalism and physiology mediate fish biogeographic ranges under ocean warming, Hayes et al., Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences Open Access 10.1098/rspb.2023.2206

Effects of climate trends and variability on tree health responses in the Black Sea and Mediterranean forests of Türkiye, Dogan Ciftci et al., Theoretical and Applied Climatology Open Access pdf 10.1007/s00704-024-04853-6

Evapotranspiration and its partitioning during and following a mountain pine beetle infestation of a lodgepole pine stand in the interior of British Columbia, Canada, Hao et al., Frontiers in Forests and Global Change Open Access pdf 10.3389/ffgc.2024.1352853

Feasting on the ordinary or starving for the exceptional in a warming climate: Phenological synchrony between spongy moth (Lymantria dispar) and budburst of six European tree species, Vitasse et al., Ecology and Evolution Open Access pdf 10.1002/ece3.10928

Major changes in fish thermal habitat diversity in Canada’s Arctic lakes due to climate change, Gillis et al., Communications Earth & Environment Open Access pdf 10.1038/s43247-024-01251-8

Maximum tree height in European Mountains decreases above a climate-related elevation threshold, Gelabert et al., Communications Earth & Environment Open Access pdf 10.1038/s43247-024-01246-5

Potential extinction cascades in a desert ecosystem: Linking food web interactions to community viability, Eichenwald et al., Ecology and Evolution Open Access pdf 10.1002/ece3.10930

Predicting the current habitat refugia of Himalayan Musk deer (Moschus chrysogaster) across Nepal, Dhami et al., Ecology and Evolution Open Access 10.1002/ece3.10949

Rapid sea level rise causes loss of seagrass meadows, Capistrant-Fossa & Dunton Dunton, Communications Earth & Environment Open Access pdf 10.1038/s43247-024-01236-7

Real-world time-travel experiment shows ecosystem collapse due to anthropogenic climate change, Li et al., Nature Communications Open Access pdf 10.1038/s41467-024-45487-6

Shortening fire return interval predisposes west-central Canadian boreal peatlands to more rapid vegetation growth and transition to forest cover, Jones et al., Global Change Biology Open Access pdf 10.1111/gcb.17185

Soil microenvironmental variation drives below-ground trait variation and interacts with macroclimate to structure above-ground trait variation of arctic shrubs, Fraterrigo et al., Journal of Ecology Open Access pdf 10.1111/1365-2745.14278

Taking the beat of the Arctic: are lemming population cycles changing due to winter climate?, Gauthier et al., Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences Open Access pdf 10.1098/rspb.2023.2361

Transition from positive to negative indirect CO2 effects on the vegetation carbon uptake, Chen et al., Nature Communications Open Access pdf 10.1038/s41467-024-45957-x

Vegetation Productivity Slowdown on the Tibetan Plateau Around the Late 1990s, Ren et al., Geophysical Research Letters Open Access pdf 10.1029/2023gl103865

GHG sources & sinks, flux, related geochemistry

Biodegradation of Ancient Organic Carbon Fuels Seabed Methane Emission at the Arctic Continental Shelves, You, Global Biogeochemical Cycles Open Access 10.1029/2023gb007999

Boreal–Arctic wetland methane emissions modulated by warming and vegetation activity, Yuan et al., Nature Climate Change Open Access pdf 10.1038/s41558-024-01933-3

Carbon dioxide emissions and environmental risks: Long term and short term, Boubaker et al., Risk Analysis Open Access 10.1111/risa.14281

Carbon dynamics shift in changing cryosphere and hydrosphere of the Third Pole, Gao et al., Earth 10.1016/j.earscirev.2024.104717

Carbon sequestration and nitrogen loss drive the evolution of French forest soils, Saenger et al., Frontiers in Forests and Global Change Open Access 10.3389/ffgc.2024.1338239

Deglaciation-enhanced mantle CO2 fluxes at Yellowstone imply positive climate feedback, Clerc et al., Nature Communications Open Access 10.1038/s41467-024-45890-z

Developing unbiased estimation of atmospheric methane via machine learning and multiobjective programming based on TROPOMI and GOSAT data, Li et al., Remote Sensing of Environment 10.1016/j.rse.2024.114039

Emergent temperature sensitivity of soil organic carbon driven by mineral associations, Georgiou et al., Nature Geoscience Open Access 10.1038/s41561-024-01384-7

Energy use efficiency of soil microorganisms: Driven by carbon recycling and reduction, Wang & Kuzyakov, Global Change Biology Open Access pdf 10.1111/gcb.16925

Evaluation and optimisation of the soil carbon turnover routine in the MONICA model (version 3.3.1), Aiteew et al., Open Access 10.5194/egusphere-2023-760

Fast Transit of Carbon Inputs in Global Soil Profiles Regardless of Entering Depth, Wang et al., Earth's Future Open Access pdf 10.1029/2023ef003982

Foliar N2O emissions constitute a significant source to atmosphere, Qin et al., Global Change Biology 10.1111/gcb.17181

Gibbs energy or enthalpy—What is relevant for microbial C-turnover in soils?, , A Open Access 10.1615/atoz.g.gibbs_energy

Lawns and meadows in urban green space – a comparison from perspectives of greenhouse gases, drought resilience and plant functional types, Trémeau et al., Biogeosciences Open Access 10.5194/bg-21-949-2024

Spatial and temporal variations of gross primary production simulated by land surface model BCC&AVIM2.0, Li et al., Advances in Climate Change Research Open Access 10.1016/j.accre.2023.02.001

Transition from positive to negative indirect CO2 effects on the vegetation carbon uptake, Chen et al., Nature Communications Open Access pdf 10.1038/s41467-024-45957-x

UAV approaches for improved mapping of vegetation cover and estimation of carbon storage of small saltmarshes: examples from Loch Fleet, northeast Scotland, Hiles et al., Biogeosciences Open Access 10.5194/bg-21-929-2024

“Energy and enthalpy” for microbial energetics in soil, Wang & Kuzyakov, Global Change Biology 10.1111/gcb.17184

CO2 capture, sequestration science & engineering

CO2 dynamic mass balance of low permeability reservoir based on “four regions”, Wang et al., Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology 10.1002/ghg.2262

Decarbonization

Accelerated degradation of photovoltaic modules under a future warmer climate, Poddar et al., Progress in Photovoltaics: Research and Applications Open Access pdf 10.1002/pip.3788

Application of a low-cost floating solar still in Indonesia, Lauvandy et al., Energy for Sustainable Development 10.1016/j.esd.2024.101410

Assessment of the use of solar energy sources and cooling seawater in a combination of a basic and two-stage regenerative organic Rankine cycle with a vapor compression refrigeration cycle, Kara, Environment, Development and Sustainability 10.1007/s10668-024-04554-0

Daytime Radiative Cooling under Extreme Weather Conditions, Hwang, Advanced Energy and Sustainability Research Open Access pdf 10.1002/aesr.202300239

Hydrogen storage and geo-methanation in a depleted underground hydrocarbon reservoir, Hellerschmied et al., Nature Energy Open Access pdf 10.1038/s41560-024-01458-1

Primary vs grey: A critical evaluation of literature sources used to assess the impacts of offshore wind farms, Szostek et al., Environmental Science & Policy Open Access 10.1016/j.envsci.2024.103693

Geoengineering climate

Diatom-mediated food web functioning under ocean artificial upwelling, Goldenberg et al., Scientific Reports Open Access 10.1038/s41598-024-54345-w

Reassessing the cooling that followed the 1991 volcanic eruption of Mt. Pinatubo, Boretti, Journal of Atmospheric and Solar 10.1016/j.jastp.2024.106187

Black carbon

Increase in precipitation scavenging contributes to long-term reductions of light-absorbing aerosol in the Arctic, Heslin-Rees et al., Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Open Access 10.5194/acp-24-2059-2024

Aerosols Climate change communications & cognition

Blurring societal acceptance by lack of knowledge—insights from a German coastal population study on blue carbon, Fink & Ratter, Frontiers in Climate Open Access pdf 10.3389/fclim.2024.1283712

Climate change education through drama and social learning: Playful inquiry for building extreme weather events adaptation scenarios, Borba et al., Journal of Adult and Continuing Education 10.1177/14779714241227833

Dear Tampa Bay: Creating and Leveraging a Climate Resilience Documentary Film Using Story-Telling for Citizen Engagement, Johns et al., Environmental Communication 10.1080/17524032.2024.2315181

Inter- and transdisciplinary reasoning for action: the case of an arts–sciences–humanities intervention on climate change, Poliseli & Caniglia, Sustainability Science Open Access 10.1007/s11625-024-01469-7

Orchestrating the climate choir: the boundaries of scientists’ expertise, the relevance of experiential knowledge, and quality assurance in the public climate debate, Nicolaisen, Climatic Change Open Access pdf 10.1007/s10584-024-03697-3

Voices of transitions: Korea's online news media and user comments on the energy transition, Kim et al., Energy Policy 10.1016/j.enpol.2024.114020

Agronomy, animal husbundry, food production & climate change

A Warmer and Wetter World Would Aggravate GHG Emissions Intensity in China's Cropland, Zhang et al., Earth's Future Open Access pdf 10.1029/2023ef003614

Developing a composite weighted indicator-based index for monitoring and evaluating climate-smart agriculture in India, Singh et al., Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change 10.1007/s11027-024-10109-5

Disparities between climate change facts and farmer’s awareness and perception in an arid region: A case study of the middle and lower reaches of the Heihe River Basin in northwest China, Liu et al., Climate Risk Management Open Access 10.1016/j.crm.2024.100588

Finding climate smart agriculture in civil-society initiatives, Davila et al., Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change Open Access pdf 10.1007/s11027-024-10108-6

Over-reliance on water infrastructure can hinder climate resilience in pastoral drylands, Piemontese et al., Nature Climate Change Open Access pdf 10.1038/s41558-024-01929-z

Pantropical CO2 emissions and removals for the AFOLU sector in the period 1990–2018, Nyawira et al., Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change Open Access pdf 10.1007/s11027-023-10096-z

Smallholder farmers’ cropping decisions in rural North-west Ghana under climate variability and change, Dakurah et al., Regional Environmental Change 10.1007/s10113-023-02168-2

Understanding farmers’ awareness of Climate Services: knowledge, practice, and attitude towards weather information in Benin, West Africa, Yegbemey et al., Regional Environmental Change 10.1007/s10113-023-02178-0

Hydrology, hydrometeorology & climate change

HERA: a high-resolution pan-European hydrological reanalysis (1950–2020), Tilloy et al., Open Access 10.5194/essd-2024-41

Integrated management of surface water and groundwater for climate change adaptation using hydrological modeling, Petpongpan et al., Environment, Development and Sustainability 10.1007/s10668-024-04503-x

Reservoir Drawdown Highlights the Emergent Effects of Water Level Change on Reservoir Physics, Chemistry, and Biology, Lewis et al., Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences Open Access 10.1029/2023jg007780

Sub-daily scale variations and trends in southwest monsoon rainfall over the West coasts of India and Myanmar, Ancy et al., Atmospheric Research 10.1016/j.atmosres.2024.107296

Vegetation Greening and Climate Warming Increased the Propagation Risk From Meteorological Drought to Soil Drought at Subseasonal Timescales, Ma & Yuan, Geophysical Research Letters Open Access pdf 10.1029/2023gl107937

Climate change economics

Municipal finance shapes urban climate action and justice, Diezmartínez & Short Gianotti, Nature Climate Change 10.1038/s41558-024-01924-4

Climate change and the circular economy

The closed carbon cycle in a managed, stable Anthropocene, Johnson, The Anthropocene Review Open Access pdf 10.1177/20530196231184777

Climate change mitigation public policy research

Are pollution control bonds the solution for energy firms under the magnifying glass?, Bargaoui et al., Environment, Development and Sustainability 10.1007/s10668-023-04441-0

China contributed to low-carbon development: carbon emission increased but carbon intensity decreased, Huang et al., Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution Open Access pdf 10.3389/fevo.2024.1338742

Decarbonization of waste management practices and GHG accounting for energy transition: evidence from European electricity corporations’ reporting, Di Vaio et al., Environment, Development and Sustainability Open Access 10.1007/s10668-024-04629-y

Defueling the impasse: EU political discourse on e-fuels, Birel et al., Energy Policy Open Access 10.1016/j.enpol.2024.114022

Design national framework climate laws to enable low-carbon resilient transformation, Dubash, Science 10.1126/science.ado0317

Environmental, social, and governance reporting adoption factors for sustainable development at the country level, Paridhi et al., Environment, Development and Sustainability Open Access 10.1007/s10668-024-04537-1

Forest carbon tax and reward: regulating greenhouse gas emissions from industrial logging and deforestation in the US, Talberth & Carlson, Environment, Development and Sustainability Open Access 10.1007/s10668-024-04523-7

Offshoring emissions through used vehicle exports, Newman et al., Nature Climate Change Open Access 10.1038/s41558-024-01943-1

Systematic scenario modeling for priority assessment of sustainable development goals in China under interaction and uncertainty, Wang et al., Environment, Development and Sustainability 10.1007/s10668-024-04526-4

The intricate goal of energy security and energy transition: Considerations for Libya, Azubike & Gatiesh Gatiesh, Energy Policy Open Access 10.1016/j.enpol.2024.114005

The spatiotemporal domains of natural climate solutions research and strategies for implementation in the Pacific Northwest, USA, Chafe et al., Frontiers in Climate Open Access pdf 10.3389/fclim.2024.1273632

Variability in costs of electrifying passenger cars in Canada, Javed et al., Environmental Research: Infrastructure and Sustainability Open Access pdf 10.1088/2634-4505/ad253e

Climate change adaptation & adaptation public policy research

Barriers to climate adaptation in Norwegian building projects – Insights from moisture safety designers’ perspective, Gaarder et al., Climate Risk Management Open Access 10.1016/j.crm.2024.100590

Climate information access and use in East and Southern Africa: identifying linkages between smallholder household characteristics and climate change adaptation, Minjauw et al., Climate and Development 10.1080/17565529.2024.2307403

Climate resettlement and livelihood transformation in Rwanda: the case of Rweru Model Green Village, Dale & Ajibade, Climate and Development 10.1080/17565529.2024.2314691

Efficiency analysis of best management practices under climate change conditions in the So-okcheon watershed, South Korea, Kim et al., Frontiers in Environmental Science Open Access pdf 10.3389/fenvs.2024.1297289

Participation and co-production in climate adaptation: Scope and limits identified from a meta-method review of research with European coastal communities, Sartorius et al., WIREs Climate Change Open Access pdf 10.1002/wcc.880

Prioritising climate adaptation options to minimise financial and distributional impacts of water supply disruptions, Becher et al., Environmental Research: Infrastructure and Sustainability Open Access 10.1088/2634-4505/ad0ff0

Quantitative methods for integrating climate adaptation strategies into spatial decision support models, , Journal of Development and Social Sciences Open Access pdf 10.47205/jdss.2021(2-iv)74

Translating climate risk assessments into more effective adaptation decision-making: The importance of social and political aspects of place-based climate risk, Kythreotis et al., Environmental Science & Policy Open Access 10.1016/j.envsci.2024.103705

Climate change impacts on human health

Beyond the sine wave: unveiling climate-driven baseline mortality cycles, Walkowiak & Walkowiak, International Journal of Biometeorology 10.1007/s00484-024-02631-7

Reflections on a Century of Extreme Heat Event-Related Mortality Reporting in Canada, Yoon et al., GeoHealth Open Access pdf 10.1029/2023gh000895

Thermal stress and comfort assessment in urban areas using Copernicus Climate Change Service Era 5 reanalysis and collected microclimatic data, Silva et al., International Journal of Biometeorology Open Access 10.1007/s00484-024-02639-z

Trend, driving factors, and temperature-humidity relationship of the extreme compound hot and humid events in South China, Qiao et al., Theoretical and Applied Climatology 10.1007/s00704-024-04876-z

Other

Historical changes in wind-driven ocean circulation drive pattern of Pacific warming, Fu et al., Nature Communications Open Access pdf 10.1038/s41467-024-45677-2

Informed opinion, nudges & major initiatives

Editorial: Climate-smart solutions for tropical mountain environments, Munishi et al., Frontiers in Forests and Global Change Open Access pdf 10.3389/ffgc.2024.1374798

Health-Damaging Climate Events Highlight the Need for Interdisciplinary, Engaged Research, Stowell et al., GeoHealth Open Access pdf 10.1029/2024gh001022

Innovate green building for urban heat mitigation and adaptation, He, PLOS Climate Open Access pdf 10.1371/journal.pclm.0000352

The nationally determined contribution (NDC) as a governing instrument: a critical engagement, Jernnäs, Environmental Politics Open Access pdf 10.1080/09644016.2024.2319525

The Need for Multi-Century Projections of Sea Level Rise, Palmer & Weeks , Earth's Future Open Access pdf 10.1029/2023ef004403

Articles/Reports from Agencies and Non-Governmental Organizations Addressing Aspects of Climate Change

GETting Interconnected in PJM, Mulvaney et al., RMI

Today, interconnecting new generation to the grid is a years-long process that can involve costly upgrades to the transmission system. Surging levels of new clean generation and storage projects in development as well as rapidly rising demand for electricity have come up against an aging grid that is nearing maximum capacity. This bottleneck poses major problems for grid reliability, economic development, and climate policy. More transmission is needed to accommodate this expansion of both generation and load, but in the near term, there are tools that can used to ensure we are getting the most out of the grid we have. The authors assess the potential for grid-enhancing technologies (GETs) to facilitate the cost-effective, timely interconnection of new generation within the PJM Interconnection.

Potential Bulk Power System Impact of Electric Vehicle Chargers, North American Electric Reliability Corporation

The authors provide information to help inform electric vehicle (EV) stakeholders and policymakers about the need for greater cross-sector collaboration regarding the potential effects of the rapid growth of EV charging on bulk power systems reliability.

Carbon Clean 200®: Investing In a Clean Energy Future 2024 Performance Update, Heaps et a.l, As You Sow

The Clean200 lists the 200 major corporate players from 35 countries around the world that are at the forefront of this [energy] transition. These are the companies that are leading the way by putting sustainability at the heart of their products, services, business models, and investments, helping to move the world onto a more sustainable trajectory.

People and Planet: Addressing the Interlinked Challenges of Climate Change, Poverty and Hunger in Asia and the Pacific, Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, The Asian Development Bank, and The United Nations Development Programme

The Asia-Pacific region has made steady progress in recent decades in reducing poverty and hunger. The impact of this development is evident in increasing food security, reduced prevalence of malnutrition, and related improvements in health and well-being. Further gains are still needed, but they are hampered by multiple crises, including the lingering impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and the increasing effects of climate change. The impacts of climate change, including slow and sudden onset weather events, are reducing the ability of countries to continue to advance SDG 1 (No Poverty) and SDG 2 (Zero Hunger). The authors examine this issue at the regional and sub-regional level, identifying specific impacts of climate change on agricultural and labor productivity as well as food supply chains and food security.

Pathways to Prosperity: Building Climate Resilience, Plyer et al., Southern Economic Advancement Project, Fair Count, and the National Conference on Citizenship

The authors assemble and analyze a unique set of metrics to provide a state-by-state overview of climate shocks, climate adaptation activities, and civic health for Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. These data are invaluable in aligning public and private sector efforts, guiding decisions on where to invest and which initiatives to prioritize, and building confidence and awareness among the public. This knowledge will empower communities to actively participate in shaping their climate futures.

Agenda for a Progressive Political Economy of Carbon Removal, Nawaz et al., Institute for Responsible Carbon Removal, American University

Large amounts of carbon dioxide will need to be removed and durably stored to meet climate targets. Even the lowest estimates suggest that large new industries will need to be created to produce these removals. As both private and public investments begin to fill this gap, the foundations of an emerging carbon removal industry are now being laid via policy decisions that will shape the field to come. The authors examine the possible versions of a future with carbon removal, imagining its best forms, its worst forms, and its most likely forms. Obtaining articles without journal subscriptions

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How is New Research assembled?

Most articles appearing here are found via  RSS feeds from journal publishers, filtered by search terms to produce raw output for assessment of relevance. 

Relevant articles are then queried against the Unpaywall database, to identify open access articles and expose useful metadata for articles appearing in the database. 

The objective of New Research isn't to cast a tinge on scientific results, to color readers' impressions. Hence candidate articles are assessed via two metrics only:

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Categories: I. Climate Science

Arevon Secures $1.1 Billion for Eland 2 Solar+Storage Project

Solar Industry Magazine - Thu, 02/22/2024 - 13:10

Arevon Energy has closed $1.1 billion in aggregate financing commitments for its Eland 2 solar+storage project in Kern County, Calif. 

The 374 MW solar project, coupled with 150 MW of energy storage, is under early-stage construction and is anticipated to come online in 2025. Eland 2, combined with the project’s first phase, Eland 1, collectively represent one of the largest power plants in the company’s portfolio. 

“The Eland 2 financing is an amazing accomplishment after Eland 1 which achieved financial close in 2022,” says Arevon’s Daniel Murphy. Both projects are excellent examples of Arevon’s ability to execute on large, complex transactions. I’m proud of our team’s achievement and grateful to our valued partners as we continue to complete successful transactions in this increasingly intricate space.”

Under a long-term PPA with Southern California Public Power Authority, Eland 2 will provide 200 MW AC of electricity to serve the power needs of Southern California. Solar generated by this project is enhanced by Tesla’s Megapack 2 XL battery system. San Diego-based SOLV Energy is the project’s EPC contractor.

Wells Fargo provided a $431 million tax equity commitment. Arevon obtained $654 million of debt financing including a construction-to-term loan, a tax equity bridge loan and letter of credit facilities. Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce served as the administrative agent, coordinating lead arranger, green loan coordinator, and bookrunner. Other coordinating lead arrangers included BNP Paribas, CoBank, Commerzbank AG, Commonwealth Bank of Australia and National Bank of Canada. J.P. Morgan served as joint lead arranger, collateral and depositary agent. Amis, Patel & Brewer represented Arevon as sponsor counsel. Milbank served as lender counsel and Sheppard Mullin served as tax equity counsel.

The post Arevon Secures $1.1 Billion for Eland 2 Solar+Storage Project appeared first on Solar Industry.

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