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University of Adelaide researchers successfully split seawater to produce green hydrogen

Renew Economy - Wed, 02/01/2023 - 00:40

Researchers from the University of Adelaide say they have successfully split seawater without pre-treatment to produce green hydrogen.

The post University of Adelaide researchers successfully split seawater to produce green hydrogen appeared first on RenewEconomy.

Canadian Solar Sector Saw Marked Growth in 2022

Solar Industry Magazine - Tue, 01/31/2023 - 14:28

The Canadian Renewable Energy Association (CanREA) has completed its analysis of year-end 2022 data, finding that Canada’s wind and solar energy sectors grew by 10.5% last year.

“Canada now has an installed capacity of more than 19 GW of utility-scale wind and solar energy, having added more than 1.8 GW of new generation capacity in 2022,” says Phil McKay, CanREA’s senior director, technical and utility affairs.

Solar is growing particularly quickly: More than one quarter of all the installed capacity in Canada was added in 2022 alone.

Western Canada accounted for 98% of Canada’s total growth in 2022, with Alberta adding 1,391 MW and Saskatchewan adding 387 MW of installed capacity. Quebec contributed 24 MW to the total growth for 2022, Ontario 10 MW and Nova Scotia 2 MW.  

As it grows, the renewables sector is emerging as an important force for job creation, primarily in the construction of new facilities, but also in the ongoing operations and maintenance of these sites. Canada’s wind and solar industry accounted for approximately 4,462 person-years of employment in 2022, having grown by an impressive 86%.

“Growth in the renewables sector means job growth for Canadians,” says McKay, “and we are anticipating these employment opportunities to keep expanding exponentially as the renewables industry continues to grow.” 

While last year’s growth of 1.8 GW was significantly larger than in 2021 (< 1 GW), it does not meet the growth rate called for in CanREA’s 2050 Vision, Powering Canada’s Journey to Net-Zero, which states that Canada needs to deploy more than 5 GW of new wind and solar energy every year to meet its commitment to net-zero GHG emissions by 2050.

“Canada is just starting to take advantage of its wind and solar energy potential,” says Vittoria Bellissimo, CanREA’s president and CEO. “The country needs to do more to unlock the benefits of the enormous opportunities offered by renewable energy. We have massive, untapped wind and solar resources, the lowest-cost sources of new decarbonized electricity generation available today.”

Significantly more growth in the deployment of wind and solar energy can be expected in the near future. CanREA’s data team is tracking more than 2 GW of projects that are currently under construction across Canada, plus another 6 GW of projects in advanced stages of development, for a total forecast of more than 5 GW of wind, 2 GW of major solar and 1 GW of energy storage expected in the next few years.

At the same time, CanREA is working with federal and provincial governments to unlock many more gigawatts of additional opportunities in their jurisdictions. 

“CanREA is working hard to dramatically accelerate and expand the deployment of wind, solar and energy-storage technologies – there are several policy, regulatory and infrastructure barriers that we think need to be addressed,” says Bellissimo.

In the solar sector specifically:

  • Solar energy grew by 25.9% (810 MW) in 2022, to a new total installed capacity of nearly 4 GW;
  • More than a quarter of Canada’s current solar capacity was installed in 2022;
  • Alberta accounts for almost all this growth, with 759 MW of 771 MW. Saskatchewan installed 10 MW, Nova Scotia 2 MW, and Yukon 0.1 MW this year;
  • As of Dec. 31, 2022, Ontario had more than 1.9 GW of installed solar PV capacity, powering nearly 517,000 homes.

Photo by Jason Hafso on Unsplash

The post Canadian Solar Sector Saw Marked Growth in 2022 appeared first on Solar Industry.

Canadian Renewables Sector Grew by 1.8 GW in 2022

North American Windpower - Tue, 01/31/2023 - 14:14

The Canadian Renewable Energy Association (CanREA) has completed its analysis of year-end 2022 data, finding that Canada’s wind and solar energy sectors grew by 10.5% last year.

“Canada now has an installed capacity of more than 19 GW of utility-scale wind and solar energy, having added more than 1.8 GW of new generation capacity in 2022,” says Phil McKay, CanREA’s senior director, technical and utility affairs.

Solar is growing particularly quickly: More than one quarter of all the installed capacity in Canada was added in 2022 alone.

Western Canada accounted for 98% of Canada’s total growth in 2022, with Alberta adding 1,391 MW and Saskatchewan adding 387 MW of installed capacity. Quebec contributed 24 MW to the total growth for 2022, Ontario 10 MW and Nova Scotia 2 MW.  

As it grows, the renewables sector is emerging as an important force for job creation, primarily in the construction of new facilities, but also in the ongoing operations and maintenance of these sites. Canada’s wind and solar industry accounted for approximately 4,462 person-years of employment in 2022, having grown by an impressive 86%.

SOURCE: CanREA

“Growth in the renewables sector means job growth for Canadians,” says McKay, “and we are anticipating these employment opportunities to keep expanding exponentially as the renewables industry continues to grow.” 

While last year’s growth of 1.8 GW was significantly larger than in 2021 (< 1 GW), it does not meet the growth rate called for in CanREA’s 2050 Vision, Powering Canada’s Journey to Net-Zero, which states that Canada needs to deploy more than 5 GW of new wind and solar energy every year to meet its commitment to net-zero GHG emissions by 2050.

“Canada is just starting to take advantage of its wind and solar energy potential,” says Vittoria Bellissimo, CanREA’s president and CEO. “The country needs to do more to unlock the benefits of the enormous opportunities offered by renewable energy. We have massive, untapped wind and solar resources, the lowest-cost sources of new decarbonized electricity generation available today.”

Significantly more growth in the deployment of wind and solar energy can be expected in the near future. CanREA’s data team is tracking more than 2 GW of projects that are currently under construction across Canada, plus another 6 GW of projects in advanced stages of development, for a total forecast of more than 5 GW of wind, 2 GW of major solar and 1 GW of energy storage expected in the next few years.

At the same time, CanREA is working with federal and provincial governments to unlock many more gigawatts of additional opportunities in their jurisdictions. 

“CanREA is working hard to dramatically accelerate and expand the deployment of wind, solar and energy-storage technologies – there are several policy, regulatory and infrastructure barriers that we think need to be addressed,” says Bellissimo.

  • In the wind power sector specifically:
  • Wind energy grew by 7.1% (1 GW) in 2022, to a new total of more than 15 GW of installed capacity;
  • Western Canada blew ahead of the pack in 2022, thanks to significant growth in Alberta (nearly 605 MW) and Saskatchewan (377 MW), as well as some new wind in Quebec (24 MW);
  • As of Dec. 31, 2022, Ontario had more than 5.5 GW in total installed wind capacity, powering nearly 1.5 million homes. Quebec had nearly 4 GW. Alberta had a new total of 2.6 GW, Saskatchewan had 804 MW of installed wind capacity, and Nova Scotia had 616.  

Photo by Jason Hafso on Unsplash

The post Canadian Renewables Sector Grew by 1.8 GW in 2022 appeared first on North American Windpower.

‘No regrets’ approach to big batteries, green hydrogen and grid reliability urgently needed, analysts say

Utility Dive - Tue, 01/31/2023 - 10:42

Advanced batteries and green hydrogen promise long-duration energy storage solutions for “net zero” system reliability, but only regulatory policy and market support can fulfill that promise, industry stakeholders say.

WEC Energy Makes Major Investment in Texas-Based Solar

Solar Industry Magazine - Tue, 01/31/2023 - 08:32

WEC Energy Group says it is acquiring an 80% ownership interest in the Samson I Solar Energy Center: a 250 MW project located about 140 miles northeast of Dallas that was developed and built by Invenergy and began operations in May 2022.

Samson I is part of the five-phase Samson solar portfolio. The portfolio is being built on 18,000 acres in northeast Texas, and when completed, it is expected to total 1.3 GW.

Samson I is generating energy under a long-term power purchase agreement with AT&T. It is eligible for production tax credits as outlined in the Inflation Reduction Act passed by Congress.

WEC Energy Group’s investment is expected to total approximately $250 million for the 80% ownership interest.

This project is the second solar investment announced in WEC Energy Group’s infrastructure segment. The company also has existing or planned investments in eight major wind farms. Taken together, these solar and wind projects have nearly 2 GW of capacity.

WEC Energy Group’s principal utilities are We Energies, Wisconsin Public Service, Peoples Gas, North Shore Gas, Michigan Gas Utilities, Minnesota Energy Resources and Upper Michigan Energy Resources. Another subsidiary, We Power, designs, builds and owns electric generating plants. In addition, WEC Infrastructure LLC owns a growing fleet of renewable generation facilities in the Midwest.

Photo by Jadon Kelly on Unsplash

The post WEC Energy Makes Major Investment in Texas-Based Solar appeared first on Solar Industry.

Navigating Energy Transitions: IISD webinar

Pembina Institute News - Tue, 01/31/2023 - 08:19
This webinar will unpack key findings from IISD’s report, outlining barriers to energy transitions, and highlight solutions to overcome such challenges. Additionally, it will provide Canadian policy-makers and financial institutions with information on how they can navigate the current energy crisis, while maintaining ambition to limit warming to 1.5°C. Jan Gorski, Director of the Pembina Institute's oil and gas program, joins the expert panel.

Wind-based PPA prices drop for first time since early 2021 while solar prices continue to climb

Utility Dive - Tue, 01/31/2023 - 08:03

The IRA has prompted developers to put more wind projects on the market, but solar remains mired in supply chain and interconnection delays, said renewable energy marketplace LevelTen Energy.

SolaREIT Nets Injection of Capital from Atlantic Union Bank

Solar Industry Magazine - Tue, 01/31/2023 - 07:50

SolaREIT, a solar real estate investment fund, says it has closed on a revolving credit facility with Atlantic Union Bank (AUB), giving the company an additional $15 million of liquidity and enabling it to aggregate land and leases under community solar projects prior to placing them into a securitization facility.

“The revolving credit facility with Atlantic Union Bank compliments our securitization facility with Nuveen/TIAA CREF, further allowing us to scale nationally,” says Laura Pagliarulo, president of SolaREIT.

SolaREIT provides solar developers and landowners with capital solutions, including land purchases, lease purchases and solar loans, that allow landowners to access the full value of their solar land.

The post SolaREIT Nets Injection of Capital from Atlantic Union Bank appeared first on Solar Industry.

Orsted Leveraging Aegir Insights for Offshore Wind Intel

North American Windpower - Tue, 01/31/2023 - 07:33

Aegir Insights, a company focused on offshore wind intelligence and investment solutions, says it has brought on offshore wind developer Ørsted A/S as a client.

The agreement provides Ørsted with access to the Aegir Insights product portfolio, enabling better informed decisions on offshore wind opportunities. As a client, Ørsted will also provide feedback on Aegir Insights’ product development roadmap.

Aegir Insights says it combines deep industry experience with advanced data science and visualization solutions in order to help offshore wind investors make better strategic decisions that are trusted by developers and governments.

”Ørsted is the world’s leading offshore wind developer and one of the pioneers of the industry,” says Rikke Nørgaard, CCO of Aegir Insights. “We are proud to have them as a platform user. This will be a transformational year for Aegir Insights, where on the back of our recent seed investment, we are investing heavily in technology for the next generation of our product portfolio in close cooperation with our industry partners.”

Aegir Insights recently closed a seed investment round led by Norwegian energy sector executive Jon Erik Reinhardsen and Denmark’s Export & Investment Fund to support buildout of its scalable intelligence and workflow solutions for offshore wind investors.

The post Orsted Leveraging Aegir Insights for Offshore Wind Intel appeared first on North American Windpower.

TravelCenters of America to deploy 1,000 EV charging ports by 2028

Utility Dive - Tue, 01/31/2023 - 06:57

The stations will appear at more than 200 locations and will be run by manufacturer Electrify America. 

DOE, other scientists assess alternatives to cobalt for lithium-ion batteries amid concerns

Utility Dive - Tue, 01/31/2023 - 06:27

Researchers created and analyzed a material for a lithium-ion cathode that uses no cobalt and is instead rich in nickel.

Duke Energy Planning Major Enhancements to Renewables Programs

Solar Industry Magazine - Tue, 01/31/2023 - 06:03

Duke Energy has proposed an expansion to its Green Source Advantage (GSA) program that would give customers the option to supplement their power usage with 100% renewable power and the ability to pair renewable projects with energy storage.

Details for the GSA Choice program were outlined in a filing with the North Carolina Utilities Commission.

“Many of our large business customers seek renewable power sources and are making decarbonization a long-term part of their business plans,” says Lon Huber, Duke Energy’s senior vice president, pricing and customer solutions. “Duke Energy is proud to offer these customers a wide range of options, including the ability to increase their hourly use with carbon-free energy in one of the country’s first time-aligned clean-energy programs.”

Duke Energy’s GSA program was launched in 2017 and has been used by customers such as the City of CharlotteBank of AmericaWells Fargo and Duke University. The changes build and expand on that program.

Up to 4,000 MW of capacity will be available under the GSA Choice program, which is more than 10 times the capacity now available. It will provide customers a path toward having 24×7 clean energy. It allows large customers to offset their power purchases by securing renewable energy from projects connected to the Duke Energy grid. The customer may count the renewable energy generated to satisfy their sustainability goals.

Among the changes to the program:

  • Customers can contract for up to 100% of their energy use. Previously, the program’s details only allowed for about 30% of total energy use.
  • Customers can work directly with Duke Energy or independent developers for their long-term purchase of renewable energy.
  • Customers may also combine energy storage with their project – allowing them to align the production of renewable energy with their energy load.
  • Duke Energy is also proposing a new 10-year avoided cost bill credit option in addition to the existing hourly, two-year and five-year options.

Another program being proposed – Clean Energy Impact – is ideal for customers who want to claim a certain percentage of renewable energy through environmental attribute purchases in support of corporate sustainability goals, or for residential customers that would like to support the local renewable energy industry.

The program with feature locally source renewable energy certificates; month-to-month contracts with no long-term commitments. Clean Energy Impact will be available to residential customers, who can purchase renewable energy to match their energy use at the level of their choosing. It will be ideal for renters, or customers who aren’t able or looking to install solar.

“We’re continuing to fine-tune our renewable energy options for all customers and are looking at programs such as community solar in the future. That will allow customers to directly subscribe to the output of a solar facility,” adds Huber.

To learn more about these programs, business customers can visit here, while residential customers can find more information here.

The post Duke Energy Planning Major Enhancements to Renewables Programs appeared first on Solar Industry.

Meta In Line for 195 MW of Solar in Texas

Solar Industry Magazine - Mon, 01/30/2023 - 08:50

Apex Clean Energy has executed an environmental attribute purchase agreement (EAPA) with Meta for the full capacity of the 195 MW Angelo Solar in Tom Green County, Texas.

This agreement follows other previously announced transactions between Apex and Meta: an 80 MW EAPA with Altavista Solar; 200 MW with Aviator Wind East, part of the largest single-phase, single-site wind project in the United States; 175 MW with Lincoln Land Wind; 197 MW with Jayhawk Wind; and, most recently, 225 MW with Great Pathfinder Wind.

“The success of our company and our mission, to accelerate the shift to clean energy, relies on partnerships with first movers like Meta that have set ambitious standards driving the energy transition,” says Mark Goodwin, president and CEO of Apex Clean Energy. “As we advance our sixth project alongside Meta, this portfolio, now totaling more than a gigawatt, represents a diverse set of best-in-class wind and solar projects in markets across the United States.”

“We appreciate Apex’s partnership in helping us bring a total of one gigawatt of new renewable energy to the grid across Texas, Virginia, Illinois, Kansas, and Iowa,” adds Urvi Parekh, head of renewable energy at Meta. “This new solar project will support our commitment to 100% renewable energy and will help bring jobs and investment to the local community.”

Angelo Solar will generate approximately $31.7 million in tax revenue for the local community, at least $22 million in landowner payments, and approximately 400 jobs during construction.

Angelo is expected to begin commercial operations in early 2024.

The post Meta In Line for 195 MW of Solar in Texas appeared first on Solar Industry.

Urban Delivery Solutions Initiative Impact Report (publication)

Pembina Institute News - Mon, 01/30/2023 - 03:55
Goals and regulations are coming in to require more electric vehicles, and the Urban Delivery Solutions Initiative partners have been actively involved in helping Canada achieve the targets by developing and informing recommendations to the federal government and by building resources and tools for businesses and fleet operators. Our impact report outlines the work we've done in the last year.

Cryptocurrency’s Energy Consumption Problem

Rocky Mountain Institute - Mon, 01/30/2023 - 03:00

Cryptocurrency has an energy consumption problem. Bitcoin alone is estimated to consume 127 terawatt-hours (TWh) a year, more than some countries, such as Norway, consume. In fact, cryptocurrency activity in the United States is estimated to emit from 25 to 50 million tons of CO2 each year. Therefore, decarbonizing the crypto industry is essential to achieving a safe climate future. Yet, at this time, we don’t believe that direct engagement with the crypto community is the best course toward that goal.

So although RMI is proud to have played a role in initial decarbonization efforts, moving forward, our focus will revolve around decarbonizing the grid rather than crypto transactions. In this article, we reflect on the state of the crypto industry: what work has been done so far, the challenges of decarbonizing crypto, and how RMI will continue to pursue this goal as part of our larger effort to decarbonize global supply chains.

Progress to Date

As exorbitant electricity consumption from crypto mining became a public concern, RMI’s first step was to act as a co-convener of the Crypto Climate Accord (CCA), along with our partners Energy Web, the Alliance for Innovative Regulation (AIR), and the World Economic Forum. The CCA serves as a “private sector-led initiative focused on decarbonizing the cryptocurrency and blockchain industry,” where solutions and technologies for crypto decarbonization are created collaboratively among players across the web3 and crypto space.

As part of the CCA, RMI spearheaded the development of the CCA Accounting Guidance, a foundational guide to allocating emissions for the crypto industry. The guidance highlights the importance of a consequential accounting approach and the use of marginal emissions rates as a key to understanding crypto’s emissions impact. The guidance further supports the need to gauge grid impact rather than average emissions when assessing emissions impact.

This initial work was followed by participating in a roundtable during the drafting of the Crypto Climate Impact Accounting Framework, developed by the Crypto Carbon Ratings Institute (CCRI) and South Pole. This framework sought to define a methodology for allocating GHG emissions for crypto transactions and holdings. Because institutional investors hold an outsized stake of the crypto market, allocating emissions for these activities is vital to pressure both investors and crypto industry leaders to change their current practices.

Challenges with Crypto Decarbonization Proof-of-work energy usage

With lawmakers increasingly looking at the effects of Bitcoin mining, from both an environmental and grid-resiliency perspective, lowering energy usage of this crypto currency is a must. Bitcoin is the only major currency that uses proof-of-work mining. The large energy usage associated with proof-of-work mining is an inevitable consequence of the fundamental nature of its algorithms.

Ethereum moved to a far less energy intensive proof-of-stake consensus mechanism, reducing that network’s electrical usage by over 99.9 percent. (Here’s a discussion of the difference between proof-of-work and proof-of-stake.) A single transaction on Ethereum’s proof-of-stake network is now similar to the electrical usage of a Mastercard transaction. As a result, when we speak of the emissions impact of “crypto,” we are now largely speaking about the emissions impact of Bitcoin.

To mitigate crypto industry emissions, RMI supports the “Change the Code, Not the Climate” campaign, launched by Greenpeace and the Environmental Working Group, intended to motivate Bitcoin to move away from proof-of-work and toward a less energy-intensive consensus mechanism.

A co-benefit of Bitcoin changing its consensus mechanism would be to mitigate Bitcoin’s significant e-waste problem. As proof-of-stake and other low energy protocols require less computing power and no specialized equipment, Bitcoin ditching proof-of-work would mean the network would require far less hardware — an additional win for the climate.

Price volatility

In addition to energy usage and e-waste, the price volatility associated with Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies is a cause for concern. When prices are high, Bitcoin miners may be willing to power their operations with clean electricity. But as the price of Bitcoin comes down, smaller profit margins mean industry players are likely to seek out the cheapest electricity possible, which may not always be the cleanest. Digiconimist currently estimates a “cost percentage” of Bitcoin mining, which shows that miners spend a majority of their income on electricity.

Furthermore, there are attempts to use Bitcoin for demand response on power grids, with Texas’ ERCOT being the prime example. There are concerns, however, about the ability of Bitcoin miners to be relied upon for these services. If prices are too high, miners won’t prioritize limiting power usage, putting increased pressure on a grid that has experienced significant stress in recent years.

Electricity procurement

With emissions on the scale of entire countries, it is imperative for Bitcoin mining, in the absence of changing to a low-energy consensus mechanism, to be powered by new renewable energy, rather than drawing from existing renewable capacity. Because of the flexibility of Bitcoin’s load, or its ability to be mined anywhere in order to balance energy supply and demand, miners who are conscious about their footprint should be able to contract renewable energy to power their operations. Unfortunately, as public data from Greenpeace shows, this is not currently the case. Bitcoin miners are largely contracting energy from fossil sources and claims of sustainability tend to be based on being co-located near renewables.

Some Bitcoin miners may not have direct control over their electricity usage if their mining computers are contracted out to larger data centers. This, combined with the fact that miners are not longstanding businesses with well-established credit, may make it difficult to dictate their electricity supply. In order to drive further renewable energy generation, rather than take credit for an existing portion of renewable capacity, Bitcoin miners must contract renewable energy directly.

But while energy usage remains high in Bitcoin mining, it is imperative that this energy is clean, sustainable, and additional. To ensure this, RMI developed the Renewable Energy (RE) Emissions Score, designed to assess the material impact of renewable energy procurement. By measuring the emissions impact, as well as the value provided by off-takers of renewable energy, the RE Emissions Score will allow any company, not just Bitcoin miners, to make meaningful claims about renewable energy procurement, prioritizing investment in high emissions areas and low-cost renewable projects. If Bitcoin mining is to continue, it must be powered by additional renewables so that it does not inadvertently increase required grid capacity and lead to more fossil generation.

The RE Emissions Score was born out of a need to allow Bitcoin miners to make quantifiable claims of renewable energy use and investment, but its implications are much wider. Any company currently procuring renewable energy can use this approach to show its commitment to total grid decarbonization. Focusing on the decarbonization of the grid as a whole is vital to any strategy for reducing crypto emissions.

Moving Forward

The climate effects of crypto, especially Bitcoin, are no secret. With an extremely large appetite for energy, crypto has the potential to serve as an impediment to climate progress. Price volatility has hampered climate action in the space, and without proactive procurement by miners, regulatory pressure is inevitable. Campaigns such as the CCA show an interest in addressing these issues within the community. Participating organizations cannot afford to allow these pledges to be mere words, they must act. Guidance on measuring emissions, such as the CCA Accounting Guidance and the Crypto Climate Impact Accounting Framework, are vital first steps toward allowing industry participants to understand their own climate impact and take action to reduce it. The dictum applies: you can’t manage what you can’t measure.

The path toward decarbonization is clear: Bitcoin must discard its energy intensive proof-of-work consensus mechanism. Luckily, we know this is possible, as shown by the Ethereum Merge. Leaving proof-of-work behind would put crypto energy use on the scale of traditional financial systems and eliminate mining’s e-waste problem. This computational change must be pursued in parallel with ensuring that current mining operations are powered by additional, renewable energy. The RE Emissions Score provides miners with the means to prove that contracted power is renewable and additional, which will be necessary to decarbonize US electricity grids by 2035.

Though our direct engagement with crypto is coming to a close, RMI’s work to decarbonize the grid and transform the global energy system will continue.

The post Cryptocurrency’s Energy Consumption Problem appeared first on RMI.

National Express West Midlands invests record £150 million in 300 UK-made electric zero emission buses

Renewable Energy Magazine - Fri, 01/27/2023 - 12:57
National Express West Midlands is investing £150 million in 300 UK-made electric zero emission buses, for delivery by the end of December 2024 when the buses will be deployed across the West Midlands.

Hungary-MET Group completes construction of solar farms in Hungary

Renewable Energy Magazine - Fri, 01/27/2023 - 12:57
MET Group has completed construction of the MET Gerjen solar farm and MET Söjtör solar farm which have both now entered commercial operation.

Avis Budget Group and SK Group’s EverCharge Launch EV Charging Solution at Houston Airport

Renewable Energy Magazine - Fri, 01/27/2023 - 12:57
Avis Budget Group and EverCharge, an SK Group company, have launched a significant number of EV charging stations at the George Bush International Airport (IAH) in Houston, Texas. The stations will power Avis and Budget’s fleet of EVs and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) available for rent at the airport. 

Grenergy obtains nearly 500 MW in environmental permits for PV Plants in Spain

Renewable Energy Magazine - Fri, 01/27/2023 - 12:57
Grenergy, the listed renewable energy producer and specialist in the development, construction and management of photovoltaic, wind and storage projects, has obtained positive Environmental Impact Statements for three photovoltaic plants in Spain totalling 472 MW,

Processing of Bioplastics in Biogas Production

Renewable Energy Magazine - Fri, 01/27/2023 - 12:57
Biogas and biomethane are generated from different types of organic residues, turning waste into a valuable resource. A recent study shows that the increasing amount of compostable bioplastics in our waste can be collected and processed with no ecological risk to produce biogas, supporting the development of renewable energy in Europe.

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