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Updated: 3 hours 10 min ago

International Mother Earth Day 2024: An Ode to Mother Earth

Mon, 04/22/2024 - 04:45

In honor of International Mother Earth Day 2024, Dr. Juana Vera Delgado, the Senior Gender Advisor at GFC, has penned and recited a heartfelt ode to our planet, our shared home and the sanctuary of all life. This ode resonates with an indigenous, ecofeminist, and intercultural perspective, offering a stark contrast to the Lord’s Prayer, which begins, ‘Our Father…’ which originated over two millennia ago in a deeply patriarchal and colonialist era, which persists to this day.

Established in 2009 by a resolution of the United Nations General Assembly, April 22nd marks International Mother Earth Day, a day dedicated to recognizing Earth and its ecosystems as the common heritage of humanity. It underscores the imperative to safeguard our planet, not only to improve livelihoods but also to combat climate change and halt the alarming loss of biodiversity.

You can listen to Dr. Juana reciting her ode in her own voice, in English and Spanish.

GFC is also launching greeting cards for International Mother Earth Day with the Ode, in Russian, French, and Dutch. You can download them below – feel free to share these, to commemorate this powerful day. GFC honors the Indigenous Peoples and local communities the world over who safeguard the vast majority of biodiversity and life on Earth.

 

The post International Mother Earth Day 2024: An Ode to Mother Earth appeared first on Global Forest Coalition.

Categories: G1. Progressive Green

Intl Day of Peasant Struggles: Launch of case study on agroecological shelters in Argentina

Wed, 04/17/2024 - 08:00

The International Day of Peasant Struggles, commemorated annually on April 17th, echoes the enduring fight for the rights and dignity of peasants and farmers worldwide. The day was originally declared by Via Campesina International in homage to the martyrs of the 1996 Eldorado dos Carajás massacre in Pará, Brazil, when 19 members of Brazil’s Landless Workers Movement were murdered, and 69 others injured, by the military police. 

To honor the enduring struggle of peasants worldwide, the Global Forest Coalition (GFC) is unveiling Galaxias Unicam: Agroecological Shelters for Positive Living—a case study by Rafael Vera, born out of the Galaxias Refugios.

Initiated in 2018 to address the pressing need for therapeutic environments nurturing ecological and mental health, the Galaxia Refugio La Dorotea embodies the ethos of peasant life and agroecological practices in Argentina. Affiliated with the grassroots alliance MOCASE-VC-MNCI,  the UNICAM SURI serves as a beacon of Indigenous and peasant aspirations, educating youth from diverse backgrounds in various disciplines.

At its core, the Galaxias Refugios fosters partnerships with public universities, psychology and medical faculties, and governmental agencies. It champions social psychology as a transformative force, challenging conventional Eurocentric paradigms.

GFC stands in unwavering solidarity with peasants everywhere, who are forging paths of resilience, justice, and ecological harmony.

READ | GALAXIAS UNICAM: Agroecological shelters for positive living [ENG ESP]

The post Intl Day of Peasant Struggles: Launch of case study on agroecological shelters in Argentina appeared first on Global Forest Coalition.

Categories: G1. Progressive Green

GFC points out problems with forest offsets in Guyana

Thu, 04/11/2024 - 07:35

Guayana is a heavily forested country in South America, and according to reports, it’s becoming “the world’s newest petro-state.” Oil companies appear to be touting false solutions to climate impacts there, claiming that their exploitative activities in Guyana are “net zero,” but experts are raising alarm about this.

Souparna Lahiri from the Global Forest Coalition was quoted in Climate Home News:

The problem is that within the country, you are allowing the emissions to continue or even to rise, and then you are trying to balance that out internally by saying that we have this forest.

The article states:

Official United Nations carbon accounting rules, drawn up nearly 20 years ago by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), allow Guyana to claim net-zero status because they do not specify which types of forest governments can take credit for preserving – and also because the emissions from oil are counted in the country where it is used and burned, not where it is produced.

Experts said governments are taking advantage of having barely-touched forests on their land that suck up CO2, and argued that fossil fuel-rich nations like Guyana should bear part of the moral responsibility for the emissions of their polluting products.

To read more from Climate Home News, click here.

Read more of GFC’s work on forest offsets here.

 

Photo: Dinesh Chandrapal

The post GFC points out problems with forest offsets in Guyana appeared first on Global Forest Coalition.

Categories: G1. Progressive Green

Don’t gamble with our future: Reject the EU Carbon Removal Certification Framework

Mon, 04/08/2024 - 01:09
Open Letter Don’t gamble with our future: Reject the EU Carbon Removal Certification Framework

 

The Global Forest Coalition today joined with nearly 200 other organisations under the Real Zero Europe campaign in calling on the EU Parliament to reject the Carbon Removal Certification Framework (CRCF).

We are in the midst of climate and biodiversity crises and the CRCF will delay ambitious climate action. This despite the fact that the EU is not on track to meet its 2030 climate target – a target which was already too weak to address the escalating climate emergency.

This Wednesday, MEPs have the chance to reject the CRCF, and thereby refuse to endorse the fallacy that emissions can be ‘offset’ by projects that claim to remove carbon from the atmosphere. “Doing so would ensure that EU policies focus on real emissions cuts over greenwashing,” the letter reads.

Read the full letter here:

https://globalforestcoalition.org/wp-content/uploads/2024/04/RZE_Letter_to_MEPs_Reject_the_CRCF.pdf

©European Parliament/Pietro Naj-Oleari

 

Real Zero Europe – Open Letter 

Don’t gamble with our future: Reject the EU Carbon Removal Certification Framework

08 April 2024

Dear Members of the European Parliament, 

We, the Real Zero Europe campaign, are writing to ask you to reject the Carbon Removal Certification Framework (CRCF). We are in the midst of climate and biodiversity crises and the CRCF will delay ambitious climate action. This despite the fact that the EU is not on track to meet its 2030 climate target – a target which was already too weak to address the escalating climate emergency. 

This Wednesday, you have the chance to reject the CRCF, and thereby refuse to endorse the fallacy that emissions can be ‘offset’ by projects that claim to remove carbon from the atmosphere. Doing so would ensure that EU policies focus on real emissions cuts over greenwashing. 

To tackle the climate crisis, deep and rapid emissions reductions should have already happened. There is growing scientific evidence that the climate system is approaching irreversible tipping points. Action is being further delayed by the myth that Carbon Dioxide Removals (CDR) will be able to undo the damage. Even if large-scale CDR were to work in the future, they would do nothing to stop temperatures overshooting before then, threatening biodiversity and violating international law. Both land-based and technological CDR offset projects are likely to have severe impacts on people on the ground, having shown to fuel land grabbing and human rights violations in the past.

Land-based CDR offsetting projects, such as in Scotland, have led to land speculation and sharp increases in land prices. Such developments can jeopardise communities’ food sovereignty, capacities to sustainably grow food and the access to farming land for young and new farmers. Governments are already over-reliant on the land sector for emissions reductions, to the detriment of decarbonisation measures in other sectors. Globally proposed land-based removals would exceed the size of the EU, India, South Africa, and Turkey combined. Carbon stored in agricultural and forest landscapes is not permanent. It is vulnerable to the increasing impacts of the climate crisis, such as wildfires, droughts and floods.  

The CRCF would also distract from other essential activities such as increasing agroecology and close-to-nature forestry. These practices would benefit the climate, but also increase biodiversity, and deliver a living income to farmers and foresters. 

Technological proposals such as Direct Air Carbon Capture (DACCs) and Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage (BECCS) are no ‘silver bullet’ either. They are costly and energy intensive. In its special report on Global Warming of 1.5°C, the IPCC emphasised that CDR at scale is “unproven, and reliance on such technology is a major risk in the ability to limit warming to 1.5°C”. Technological measures are unlikely to deliver the promised large-scale carbon removals, but instead will support the construction of infrastructure that would lock us into continued fossil fuel use, delay the needed energy transition, reduce biodiversity, lead to land and human rights infractions. 

Definitions around “hard-to-abate” sectors and “residual” emissions have yet to be agreed. The myth of CDR projects will lead to industries or emissions being given misleading labels when the focus should be on researching innovative ways to reduce, not remove emissions.

Despite mounting evidence exposing certified offset projects which do nothing to support climate action, CRCF amendments that would have ruled out offsetting were rejected. This undermines the CRCF claim that CDR should only “complement sustained emission reductions.” Moreover, emerging discussions about integrating CRCF credits as offsets into compliance markets like the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) or a potential agriculture ETS, and endorsing existing voluntary offset markets through the Green Claims Directive are a dangerous harbinger of what is to come. By legitimising failed carbon offset markets, the CRCF would multiply their dangers not only in the region but globally. The EU needs to stand by its previously applauded agreement to exclude forests and other carbon credits from the ETS on the grounds that they undermine climate action. 

Time and time again, we’ve seen evidence that offset schemes do not benefit the climate. This will not be solved by the CRCF’s questionable rules for certification. These rules will instead make things worse by giving offsets a credibility boost, thereby extending their scope and their use.

We urge you not to legitimise a failed climate solution. But to focus instead on leaving fossil fuels in the ground, protecting our communities, soils and forests as well as the climate. Don’t gamble with our future by approving the CRCF!

The post Don’t gamble with our future: Reject the EU Carbon Removal Certification Framework appeared first on Global Forest Coalition.

Categories: G1. Progressive Green

A call for global accountability on forests

Thu, 03/21/2024 - 01:00
A call for global accountability on forests

This year’s International Day of Forests comes at a critical inflection point, as global leaders hover between unprecedented ambition and devastating complacency. While recent commitments make progress toward global forest protection more feasible than ever before, industrial pressures on forests continue to deforest and degrade the high-ecosystem integrity forests critical in securing a safe and sustainable future.

The UN has designated the theme this year as “Forests and Innovation,” celebrating the intersection between forests and technology in addressing the climate and biodiversity crises. We, however, are calling for a focus on something even more foundational to driving positive change: accountability.

Countries have made groundbreaking commitments under the climate and biodiversity conventions that can not only drive forest protection, but spur solutions and new sustainable economies.

For decades, however, the international community has failed to follow through on its commitments. Governments, particularly in the Global North, have signed international agreements on forests with one hand while weakening them with the other, creating an inequitable and inconsistent system inhospitable to progress. In fact, while some governments have already made strides toward delivering on this ambition, others are pursuing workarounds, loopholes, and policies that actively undermine their commitments, bolstered by industries that claim to want progress but instead cling to the status quo. With only a handful of years left to avoid catastrophic climate change and biodiversity collapse, there is no more time for failed promises from governments and lip service from the marketplace.

Innovation in an accountability vacuum is not only prone to failure, but dangerous.

Instead, we call for accountability. Accountability, not just in the tropics but also in the Global North, to halting and reversing deforestation and forest degradation by 2030. Accountability to principles of equity rather than protectionist impulses. Accountability to scientific integrity and to the rights of Indigenous Peoples and local communities. Accountability to present and future generations over short-term interests and industries that claim to embody innovation but instead hold back the development of sustainable economies.

Six years from now, International Day of Forests must be a celebration of what international unity was able to accomplish. That can happen only under a shared, equitable sense of responsibility and a commitment to truly global progress.

With accountability, innovation will follow.

Signed by

350 Eugene

350 Rutland County

AbibiNsroma Foundation

Advocates for the Environment

AirClim

Amnesty International

Arnhems Peil Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education

Australian Rainforest Conservation Society

Bellingen Environment Centre

Biodiversity Conservation Center

Biofuelwatch

BirdLife International

BirdLife Sweden

Blue Dalian

Bomenbond

Both ENDS

Canopy Center for Biological Diversity

Center for Sustainable Economy

Centre for Sustainability PH

Centro de Desarrollo Ambiental y Humano

Civic Monitoring of Trees

ClimActs

CLIMARTE

Climate Action for Lifelong Learners (CALL)

Climate Action Network Australia

Climate Action Network Canada

Climate Communications Coalition

Climate Justice Programme

Coastal Plain Conservation Group

CODEPINK

Colectivo VientoSur

comite schone lucht NL

Comité Schone Lucht

Conservation North

De Klimaatcoalitie

Dibeen for Environmental Development

Dogwood Alliance

Earth Action, Inc. 3

Earth Day.org

Earth Insight

Earth League International (ELI)

Earth Thrive

Earthsight

EDSP

ECO

Ei polteta tulevaisuutta

Elders Climate Action

Environment East Gippsland inc

Environmental Paper Network

Extinction Rebellion Western Massachusetts

Federatie tegen Biomassacentrales

Federation of Community Forestry Users, Nepal (FECOFUN)

Fellowship of Scientists and Engineers

Fern

Focus društvo za sonaraven razvoj

Forces for Nature, LLC

Forest Keeper

ForestCom

Forests of the World

Forum Ökologie & Papier Foundation Earth

Friends of Bats and Habitat Gippsland

Friends of the Earth United States

Front commun pour la protection de l’environnement et des espèces protégés

FUNDACIÓN NATURALEZA EL SALVADOR

Gallatin Wildlife Association

Global Forest Coalition

Global Justice Ecology Project

Global Witness

Green Arlington MA

Green Impact

Green Planet

Greenish Foundation

Greenpeace

Greenpeace Africa

Institute for Sustainable Development Foundation

Instytut Spraw Obywatelskich

Integrated Research & Action for Development

Kalang Environment Action Network

Landelijk Netwerk Bossen- en Bomenbescherming

Last Tree Laws

Latvian Ornithological Society

Leefmilieu

LIVE

Mighty Earth

Ministry for Social Justice, Peace, and Creation Care – Sisters of St. Joseph of Toronto

Mobilisation for the Environment

National Wildlife Federation

Nature Canada

Nature Forward

Nature Nova Scotia

Nature Québec

NE Forest Watch

NJ Forest Watch

NRDC (Natural Resources Defense Council)

Observatorio Ambiental Hispano

Old-Growth Forest Network

Oregon Wild Partnership for Policy Integrity

Pivot Point

Practical Action South Asia office, Kathmandu, Nepal

Rainforest Action Network

Rainforest Foundation

Norway

ROBIN WOOD SAFIRE

Save Estonia’s Forests

Silva Forest Foundation

Snupfen-Solidaires Meuse

Social Compassion in Legislation

Sociedad Amigos del Viento

Society for Responsible Design Solutions for Our Climate

Sport and Sustainability International

Stamp Out Poverty

Stand.earth

Standing Trees

Stichting MOB

TEAL Climate

Teraz Lasy

The ChariTree Foundation

The Enviro Show

Third Act Vermont

Trend Asia

Tropica Verde e.V.

Turtle Island Restoration Network

Uganda Coalition for Sustainable Development / East African SusWatch Network

Victorian Forest Alliance

Wendell State Forest Alliance

Wild Heritage

Wild Nature Institute

Wilderness Australia

Wilderness Committee Women’s International League for Peace & Freedom (WILPF) Canada

Windfall Ecology Centre

Workshops for Biodiversity

World Animal Protection

World Friends for Africa Burkina Faso

Youth4Nature

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Categories: G1. Progressive Green

Guardians of Earth’s Tomorrow: How three visionary feminist organisations are changing the landscape of food justice and forest/biodiversity-protection

Thu, 03/07/2024 - 23:48

Photo: Heñói Center for Studies and Promotion of Democracy, Human Rights and Socio-environmental Sustainability, Paraguay.

 

By Chithira Vijayakumar

We live in a time where the agrifood system, driven by capitalism, colonialism and patriarchy, are actively failing both people and the planet. Therefore, it stands to reason that the solutions lie firmly in the hands of agro-ecological feminist movements led by Indigenous Peoples, as well as local communities and small peasants who are working towards food sovereignty.

Patriarchy, with its emphasis on hierarchical power dynamics and gender roles, deepens inequalities within the agrifood system. Women in all their diversities, who play significant roles in food production, caring for and the preservation of seeds, and agricultural labour, face oppression, discrimination and marginalisation, with limited access to land, resources, and decision-making power. Women produce between 60 and 80 percent of the food in most developing countries and are responsible for half of the world’s food production, but they are consistently paid less than their male counterparts. The share of women agricultural landholders globally is less than 15 per cent. In addition, patriarchal norms perpetuate a narrow definition of agriculture, privileging large-scale, industrialised production methods over diverse practices traditionally used by Indigenous Peoples as well as local communities who protect more than 80 percent of forests and biodiversity worldwide. 

This crisis is compounded by capitalism’s single-minded pursuit of profit and unlimited growth, which has enabled the corporate capture of international policy spaces, prioritised efficiency over true sustainability, and created a handful of agribusiness giants, many of them related to industrial livestock. A 2013 Oxfam study found that just ten companies control nearly every aspect of the global food supply chain, from seeds and pesticides to processing and distribution, commodity trading, processing, and retail. The ETC Group has highlighted the concentration of power and control over seeds in the hands of less than ten agrochemical corporations. This level of corporate consolidation can have significant implications for small-scale farmers, food prices, food security, forests, biodiversity, and land rights of IPs as well as local communities worldwide. 

The consequences of this system’s shortcomings are stark. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), agriculture, including both crop cultivation and unsustainable livestock production, is the leading cause of deforestation, responsible for around 80% of deforestation worldwide. It also contributes to soil degradation, water scarcity, air pollution, biodiversity loss, and the weakening of human rights, particularly of communities at the intersection of multiple marginalisation, all of which contribute to a global crisis. According to reports from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the United Nations (UN), about one-third of all food produced is wasted, while at least 828 million people – or 10 percent of the world’s population – go to bed hungry each night, two-thirds of whom are women.

So, this International Women’s Day, the Global Forest Coalition (GFC) brings you three photo essays that exemplify feminist strength and innovation led by women in all their diversities, who are standing up against large-scale commercial agrifood corporations and their devastating impacts on the world’s marginalised communities, forests, and biodiversity. 

Through our series of photo essays titled “Guardians of Earth’s Tomorrow,” we bring you stories of three visionary organisations actively shaping utopias today. Each essay tells the story of a community that is forging alternative pathways towards food sovereignty, environmental stewardship, and gender justice.

All three movements are based on circular agricultural practices that work towards food sovereignty and reclaiming public spaces and rights, unlike the current ‘produce-consume-discard with no limits’ model that industrial agriculture uses. These essays showcase the diverse ways in which Indigenous Peoples as well as local communities are working to heal the planet and build resilient, equitable food systems. They remind us that even in the face of daunting challenges, there are tangible actions we can take to create positive change.

On this International Women’s Day, let us celebrate and amplify the feminist visions and voices of those who are leading the way towards a brighter, more just future for all.

 

The Seed Fairs of Heñói
Heñói, Paraguay

In the heart of Asunción, Paraguay, two extraordinary fairs took place in 2023 against the backdrop of a fight for food sovereignty: the ‘Heñói Jey Native and Creole Seed Fair’ and the ‘Karú Soberano Fair’, which means ‘Sovereign Eating’ in the Guaraní language. They were organised under the guidance and leadership of the Heñói Seed Network. At these fairs, seeds emerge not just as agricultural treasures but as custodians of a profound legacy.

To view and download the photo essay, click here.
Available in EN and ES.

The TreeBox Project Armenian Forests NGO, Armenia

The TreeBox Project is a unique initiative by Armenian Forests NGO that combines sustainable agriculture, environmental protection, and gender justice. It allows people to plant a forest in Armenia simply by ordering a box of healthy vegan food. Most importantly, this project centers gender justice, and is run by an all-women team of eight staff members and 25 farmers. Every element that goes into a TreeBox is procured directly from women farmers and entrepreneurs.

To view and download the photo essay, click here.
Available in EN and RUS.

Agromandala Agromandala, Colombia

Agromandala is a Colombian agroecological project that grows, harvests, and markets fresh and processed foods 100% free of pesticides and cared for with all respect and love. At the core of Agromandala’s ethos lies the Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) model, a groundbreaking initiative born in August 2020 as a response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This innovative approach ensures a direct link between local organic farms and families invested in the well-being of their food sources. With over 150 varieties of edible plants, the project currently feeds around 80 families a week, of which 40 are members of the CSA.

To view and download the photo essay, click here.
Available in EN and ES.

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Categories: G1. Progressive Green

Press Release: Human Rights and Environmental Concerns Found in UN-financed large-scale Livestock Project in Colombia

Tue, 03/05/2024 - 06:59
Human Rights and Environmental Concerns Found in UN-financed large-scale Livestock Project in Colombia

Green Climate Fund, Public Banks, and other Climate Financiers must Divest from False Climate Solutions

[BOGOTA, 5 March 2024] — The United Nations-backed Green Climate Fund through &Green and the FMO (The Dutch Development Bank) and other climate financiers must halt financing false solutions to climate change and redirect support to community-based and more effective solutions to the climate crisis, the Global Forest Coalition (GFC), Movimiento Social Tejido Unuma de la Orinoquia, and Corporación Claretiana Norman Perez Bello (CCNPB) said today.

In a new report released today, GFC, Tejido Unuma de la Orinoquía, and CCNPB shed light on the pitfalls of large-scale livestock initiatives, calling for a reevaluation of climate finance allocation. The report, titled “Examining Sustainable Livestock Intensification and Financing: A Critical Analysis of the Hacienda San José Case in Colombia,” identifies and analyses the dangers of large-scale livestock initiatives and calls for a re-evaluation of the allocation of climate finance.

The reality does not align with the project’s purported sustainable goals.

One of the entrances to the Hacienda San José facilities, near the airstrip.

The Hacienda, a beef production farm in the Vichada department, has positioned itself as an exemplar of sustainable livestock farming, emphasizing genetic improvement and environmentally friendly practices. However, initial findings from field research on Hacienda San José, whose expansion is funded by the Dutch &Green Fund, the FMO and the UN’s Green Climate Fund, highlight significant risks associated with large-scale livestock projects.

“The reality does not align with the project’s purported sustainable goals,” said Andrea Echeverri, Unsustainable Livestock Campaign Coordinator for GFC, which is also a steering committee member of the Stop Financing Factory Farming coalition. “There is no room for large-scale livestock farming in equitable, sustainable, decolonial and gender-just food systems. We need to divest from factory farming and redirect finance flows towards sustainable food systems that encourage local and culturally appropriate food chains.” 

The Hacienda has been receiving funds through the Dutch &Green Fund since 2021, and in 2023, the UN’s Green Climate Fund granted approval of further funding during its July 2023 board meeting in Incheon, Korea, under the 980-million-USD FP212 Project

In Colombia, the project included in the portfolio is the expansion of the Hacienda San José, justified under the concept of Sustainable Livestock Intensification. Hacienda San José aims to reach 400,000 hectares by 2050, and the initial expansion of 180,000 hectares financed by &Green is considered a starting point. This expansion will be facilitated through a loan of 30 billion Colombian pesos (USD 7.5 million).

The report identifies key concerns within the Hacienda San José plan around its land expansion and Indigenous rights, with plans to expand the Hacienda conflicting with the Sikuani Reservation Campo Alegre y Ripialito expansion plans and post-conflict land restitution efforts. Importantly, field research uncovered that Indigenous Sikuani people do not feel they were adequately informed or consulted, violating the principle of Free, Prior, and Informed Consent.

Hacienda San José is an attempt at expansion and land grabbing, far from the rights of Indigenous and peasant peoples.

Issues were also raised regarding Hacienda’s corporate social responsibility commitments, with its support for education failing quality standards and relevance to the local context and limited access to essential resources for students. Claims of investments in the local health centre could not be verified during field visits.

The report also highlights issues around labour conditions, with workers raising concerns about harsh working conditions, including using internationally banned insecticides without proper protection. Projected employment numbers have also not been met, raising questions about the Hacienda’s commitment to its workforce.

A day to share information about the HSJ expansion: In November 2023, for two days, traditional authorities, men, women and children attended a workshop to share and gather information about the project and the HSJ.

Furthermore, there are also concerns regarding the environmental impact of the planned expansion. Operations at Hacienda San José reportedly negatively affect biodiversity and soil quality, leading to a loss of wildlife in the region. The farm’s offsetting activities are likely inadequate to compensate for increased greenhouse gas emissions from cattle.

“Contrary to strengthening the enjoyment of territory for native populations, Hacienda San José is an attempt at expansion and land grabbing, far from the rights of Indigenous and peasant peoples; as plans to exponentially expand Hacienda San José (with climate finance) conflict with the claim of expansion of the Indigenous Resguardo, as well as post-conflict land restitution efforts”, said Jaime León, of the Corporación Claretiana Norman Pérez Bello.

The FP212 project, totalling USD 981.6 million, aims to promote sustainable raw material production and enhance agricultural productivity across 11 countries in Latin America, Africa, and Asia, with the goal of reducing deforestation for agricultural purposes. Despite being classified as a high-risk project (Category A) by the GCF due to its potential significant social and environmental impacts, the GCF emphasizes that accredited entities, such as the Dutch Entrepreneurial Development Bank (FMO), implement their own risk management systems. The FMO, alongside the &Green Fund, serves as the executing entity for Project FP212. The Colombian Designated National Authority, the National Department of Planning, oversees disbursement facilitation for the project.

“This is not a one-off case. This is being replicated across the globe time and again. These projects don’t only pose a threat to local environmental and community rights. Still, they are not helping us stem emissions and the threat of irreversible climate change,” said Gadir Lavadenz, GFC’s Forests and Climate Change Campaign Coordinator. “Climate finance must be redirected away from greenwashing and towards real solutions and a ‘just transition’, supporting frontline communities, conservation, protection of land and forests, and genuine reforestation.”

To combat the climate crisis effectively, climate finance must be directed towards initiatives that genuinely contribute to tackling climate change without causing harm to communities or the environment, GFC and CCNPB said.

According to GCF, the UN-backed fund is the world’s largest climate fund, with a portfolio of USD 13.5 billion (USD 51.9 billion, including co-financing) across investments in more than 120 countries. Established in 2010, the GCF has a mandate from both the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Paris Agreement to assist Global South nations in mitigating the effects of climate change. Nonetheless, the GCF has a track record of endorsing and financing contentious initiatives. For instance, it entered into a $25 million equity arrangement with the Arbaro Fund, a private equity investment firm based in Germany. This investment supported monoculture tree plantations, causing significant adverse impacts on the social, environmental, and economic fronts, particularly in the Global South

“Hacienda San José is a stark example of the gap between sustainable aspirations and on-the-ground realities. It is imperative that financiers divest from such initiatives and redirect funds to projects that truly contribute to climate solutions and that recognise historical responsibility, a common but differentiated response, and the rights and traditional knowledge and wisdom of Indigenous Peoples, women in all their diversities, and local communities​​,” said Anarley Hoyos from CCNPB.

###

For more information and media inquiries, please contact:

Ismail Wolff (English): ismail.wolff@globalforestcoalition.org
Andrea Echeverri (English/Spanish): andrea.echeverri@globalforestcoalition.org
Corporación Claretiana Norman Pérez Bello (Spanish): email: corpoclaretiananpb@corpoclaretiana.org

Download the Full Report

Executive Summaries, and the complete report in both Spanish and English are available for download on the GFC website here: 

Full Report: English, Spanish

Executive Summary: English, Spanish

About GFC

The Global Forest Coalition (GFC) is an international coalition of more than 130 NGOs and Indigenous Peoples’ Organizations across 75 countries, defending social justice and the rights of forest peoples in forest policies. GFC was founded in 2000 by 19 NGOs and Indigenous Peoples’ Organizations (IPOs) from all over the world. It is a successor to the NGO Forest Working Group, which was originally established in 1995.

About CCNPB

The Corporación Claretiana Norman Pérez Bello is a civil society organization that defends human rights and international humanitarian law, which advises and accompanies victims of socio-political violence, peasant and indigenous communities in the defense of territorial rights in the departments of Meta, Vichada, Casanare, Boyacá and Cundinamarca in Colombia.

About Tejido Unuma

Tejido Unuma de la Orinoquía is a political-organizational movement that brings together more than 20 communities, indigenous peoples and peasants from Meta, Vichada and Casanare departments in Colombia. This collective has been carrying out actions aimed at harmonizing the territory, ensuring land tenure and protection, caring for nature, revitalizing cultural and ancestral traditions, defending human rights, and building peace in the regions of the Orinoco.

The post Press Release: Human Rights and Environmental Concerns Found in UN-financed large-scale Livestock Project in Colombia appeared first on Global Forest Coalition.

Categories: G1. Progressive Green

Examining “Sustainable” Livestock Intensification and Financing: A Critical Analysis of the Hacienda San José Case in Colombia

Tue, 03/05/2024 - 03:06
Examining “Sustainable” Livestock Intensification and Financing: A Critical Analysis of the Hacienda San José Case in Colombia A Report by the Global Forest Coalition and Claretian Corporation Norman Pérez Bello, members of Tejido Únuma and Julieta Rivera Plaza Research on large-scale livestock farming in Colombia suggests financiers should divest and redirect climate finance to where it is needed

Click here to download the full report in English: Examining Sustainable Livestock Intensification and Financing: A Critical Analysis of the Hacienda San José Case in Colombia

Click here to download the full report in Spanish: Aproximación Crítica a la Llamada Intensificación Ganadera Sostenible y su Financiamiento: “El Caso Hacienda San José, en Colombia”

To tackle the climate crisis adequately, it is important that climate finance flows massively to initiatives that have real positive effects in terms of climate change mitigation and that have no negative effects on people and the environment. Can large-scale but so-called sustainable livestock initiatives stand this double test? Initial findings from field research of a large-scale livestock project in Colombia indicates that the risk of negative effects on people is significant. Issuers and recipients of climate finance must therefore be extremely diligent when it comes to large-scale but so-called sustainable livestock initiatives, especially in contexts where land and environmental rights of indigenous people are at stake.

The field research looked at the Hacienda San José, a large-scale livestock farm in Colombia that produces beef. The Hacienda has been receiving funds through the Dutch &Green Fund since 2021. And in 2023, the UN’s Green Climate Fund has decided to provide additional funds. The &Green Fund aims to promote sustainable commodity production and higher productivity on agricultural land, thereby decreasing the pressure to clear forests for agricultural purposes. The Hacienda is promoted as an example of livestock farming: it would be able to contribute to global cooling through genetic improvement and the use of the Nelore breed, characterised by being short-cycle cattle, and by the use of a grass called Brachiaria humidicola with deep roots that contributes to capturing more carbon than it generates. The Hacienda is located in the Vichada department. This is an extensive and remote territory, which is difficult to access, and with a low population density. The vast majority of the population consists of the Indigenous Sikuani peoples.

For this research, researchers analyzed project documents and conducted interviews and workshops with organizations that work in the region and with local Indigenous people and peasants. They brought to light various points of concern:

1) Hacienda San José is planning to expand its area of operation to 180,000 hectares of land, perhaps even more. These plans partly overlap with the long-standing expansion plans of the Sikuani Reservation, and they may also interfere with the land restitution process after the Colombian armed conflict. Particularly concerning in this regard is that the Sikuani people were not properly informed nor consulted about the Hacienda’s plans. People could therefore not give proper free, prior and informed consent.

2) A second area of concern is how the Hacienda has implemented its corporate social responsibility. It provided support to education, but with minimum quality standards and certainly inappropriate for the context. School guides for instance require the use of the Internet, computers, and experiments with inputs to which boys and girls do not have access. References to investments by the Hacienda in the local health center could not be verified in the field.

3) Workers of the Hacienda also raised concerns regarding the labor conditions, complaining about how hard the work was and about having to use internationally banned insecticides without proper protection. Also, the Hacienda has not yet achieved the projected employment numbers.

4) In addition, the Hacienda’s operations have negative effects on biodiversity and soil quality. People have noticed a loss of cachicamos, birds, deer, as well as fish in the streams, which results in a strong impact on the Indigenous community and the ways of life of the region.

5) Finally, the cattle raised by the Hacienda will be responsible for increased greenhouse gas emissions, which the offsetting activities will not be able to compensate.

On paper, Hacienda San José is presented as a company with great potential to contribute to tackling the climate crisis. However, the reality looks starkly different: the company interferes with the rights of Indigenous peoples, it has not lived up to its corporate social responsibility, and it has adverse effects on the environment and climate. In conclusion, funding to an initiative such as the Hacienda San José livestock farm in Colombia cannot, in its current form, be seen as real climate finance. Financiers should divest and redirect climate finance to where it is needed. More and better climate finance is needed to tackle the climate crisis adequately.

This report was made possible through support from Oxfam Novib and Misereor. The views expressed by our contributors are not necessarily the views of donors.

Download a pdf of this executive summary here in English and in Spanish

The post Examining “Sustainable” Livestock Intensification and Financing: A Critical Analysis of the Hacienda San José Case in Colombia appeared first on Global Forest Coalition.

Categories: G1. Progressive Green

Perspectives from the South: Stocktake on the Latin American and Caribbean Encounter of Peoples’ Integration

Wed, 02/28/2024 - 22:48

By Inés Franceschelli, GFC focal point for Latin American and Caribbean/ Centro de Estudios Heñói 

29 February 2024 — On February 22 and 23, a powerful meeting of social activists, unions, progressive political parties, and peasant, Indigenous and environmental organizations took place at the Foz de Iguaçu Convention Center, in Brazil, with more than three thousand participants from hundreds of organizations joining to debate in the Latin American and Caribbean Encounter of Peoples’ Integration. Among them, several members of the Global Forest Coalition from the region added their voices to the clamour for a more just and supportive world, for the defence of women’s rights and non-normative sexualities, and denouncing the genocide of the Palestinian people perpetrated by Israel and the United States.

Neither the intense heat nor the logistical difficulties prevented the debate of all the economic, political, and cultural issues needed to strengthen regional popular integration in the face of the neoliberal offensive that is advancing in the region. This need for integration received several names: construction of regional citizenship, active and united struggle, and establishment of alliances, networks, and platforms. But beyond the names, all the speakers emphasized the urgency of strengthening ourselves to resist the recurrence of violence and to propose alternatives to the current crises.

What is there after neoliberalism? We must overcome the rationality of capitalism and the shamelessness of neo-fascism, which constitute a civilizational threat, and we must put life and humanity back at the centre.

The reflections and analyses placed special emphasis on the food crisis, the risks for water availability, and the search for environmental justice, highlighting that this system does not have the capacity to respond to the concrete demands of the working class. The destruction of forests, oil prospecting, and “green economies” are not necessities; they are activities that go against food security and sovereignty. Environmental groups agreed to put regional stress on the fight for food sovereignty and to build popular participation in unity towards the Climate COP 30, which will be held in Brazil in 2025.

Especially celebrated was the participation of Francia Márquez, Afro-descendant social leader and vice president of Colombia, who emphasized the need to decolonize the Latin American territory: “South America provides the cocoa and coffee, the north provides the seal and the price. This is unacceptable, and we will fight for this emancipation.” She called to eradicate the inequality, the fear, the anxiety in which our people live: “According to FAO, since 2019, hunger has grown by 30% in Latin America and the Caribbean, while this region is the global food pantry” and closed by calling for the sowing of “seeds of fight to achieve a united and peaceful Latin America.”

The final document of the meeting proposes an agenda to resume the path of regional cooperation based on six axes: 1) Democracy and regional integration with leading social participation; 2) Free movement, regional citizenship, and rights of migrants; 3) Work and rights for all, in these times of accelerated transformations; 4) Just transition and energy sovereignty for integration; 5) Food sovereignty, and 6) Confronting the climate crisis with environmental justice, considering that at the base of the climate, environmental and food crises is the model of death and inequality imposed by capitalism.

The post Perspectives from the South: Stocktake on the Latin American and Caribbean Encounter of Peoples’ Integration appeared first on Global Forest Coalition.

Categories: G1. Progressive Green

Global Forest Coalition participates in the Latin American and Caribbean Conference of Peoples’ Integration

Mon, 02/19/2024 - 01:48

The Global Forest Coalition (GFC), an NGO with over 120 member organisations, including Indigenous Peoples and local communities worldwide, will be present at the Latin American and Caribbean Conference of Peoples’ Integration in Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil from February 22-24, 2024.

Inés Franceschelli, GFC’s focal point for Latin America and the Caribbean and executive director of Centro de Estudios Heñói in Paraguay, joins the delegation of over 1,500 participants from 15 countries that will gather in this Latin American city on the shared border between Argentina, Brazil, and Paraguay.

“We join hundreds of women political leaders, social movements, artists and land defenders to build together a political platform that will allow us to strengthen our struggles for land rights, in defence of the rights of women and Indigenous communities throughout the region,” said Franceschelli from Asunción, Paraguay.

The meeting’s thematic points include anti-imperialism, defence of democracy, sovereignty, peoples’ rights, respect for diversity, anti-racism, popular feminism, anti-colonialism and the struggle for peace.

“The Latin American and Caribbean organisations that are part of GFC have been articulating for more than a decade joint actions to expose the impacts of extractivism, carbon markets, large monocultures and climate colonisation that they want to impose on us from the Global North. We also put on the table concrete proposals to confront the climate crisis, with real solutions in defence of forest ecosystems, women, Indigenous Peoples, local communities and Afro-descendants. These days of integration allow us to articulate strategies against climate and patriarchal denialism,” she emphasised.    

The coalition will present proposals to the working group on “Food crisis and hunger”, whose main topics are food sovereignty and agrarian reform, as well as to the group “Offensive of capital against the commons. The action of transnational corporations, false solutions and the corporate capture of the energy transition.”

This effort of continental articulation aims to discuss the future of regional integration based on the vision of popular movements of the continent in the face of the serious threats arising from the advance of neoliberalism and repressive violence in the region.

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Categories: G1. Progressive Green

Working to End the Financing of Factory Farming – GFC and the S3F campaign

Fri, 02/16/2024 - 05:12

The Global Forest Coalition is one of the core members of the Stop Financing Factory Farming (S3F) campaign, along with the Bank Information Center, Friends of the Earth U.S., International Accountability Project, Sinergia Animal, and World Animal Projection—and a growing coalition of over 25 members.

In 2023, the coalition was involved in a host of actions globally, working to document and redress the harmful impacts of industrial livestock and feedstock production.

Check out the latest newsletter from the S3F campaign to find out more…

Download the newsletter here or view it in your browser below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The post Working to End the Financing of Factory Farming – GFC and the S3F campaign appeared first on Global Forest Coalition.

Categories: G1. Progressive Green

Roots of Resilience Episode 6 Stories of Climate Resilience from Central Asia

Fri, 02/16/2024 - 01:16
Roots of Resilience Episode 6 Stories of Climate Resilience from Central Asia

 

Join host Chithira Vijayakumar and dedicated advocate for biodiversity and forest protection in Central Asia and beyond Elena Kreuzberg for a compelling journey into Central Asia, an often overlooked region in the global climate conversation. In this episode, we delve into the environmental crossroads of Central Asia and shine a spotlight on the innovative climate change solutions offering us hope.

 

Tune in to listen now, and please share widely amongst your networks #RootsOfResilience

Available now in the following places and more…

 

Credits:

Chithira Vijayakumar, host, co-producer

Coraina de la Plaza, co-producer

Ismail Wolff, editor, co-producer

Cover Art: Ismail Wolff

Guests

Elena Kreuzberg,

Audio credits:

‘Black Catbird’ by the Garifuna Collective

Licensor: Stonetree Records

Link & creative Commons license details: https://shikashika.org/birdsong/artists/the-garifuna-collective/

Release date:

30 December 2023

 

The post Roots of Resilience Episode 6 Stories of Climate Resilience from Central Asia appeared first on Global Forest Coalition.

Categories: G1. Progressive Green

Joint Statement: Don’t Fuel the Fire

Thu, 02/01/2024 - 01:31
Don’t fuel the fire! We need real solutions and real emission reductions: Now, in 2040 and beyond.

 

We – over 140 organisations – call on the EU to be a true climate leader by supporting real climate action and denouncing dangerous distractions and false solutions like carbon capture and removal technologies. 

At COP28, the European Union (EU) supported calls for the world to phase out fossil fuels. But now it has been revealed that the EU’s own planned climate targets for 2040 might rely extensively on dangerous distractions, including carbon capture and storage and speculative carbon removal technologies that will delay the transition away from oil, gas, and coal. EU decision-makers must stop the hypocrisy of calling for a fossil fuel phase-out internationally, while promoting the contrary in their domestic policies.

To avoid the worst effects of climate chaos, we must immediately, equitably, and justly transform the way we produce our food, relate to the Earth’s ecosystems and power our economies. We must urgently deploy evidence-based, socially just and people-led solutions to dramatically reduce greenhouse gas emissions, down to Real Zero.

A target that includes not only emission reductions but significantly relies upon carbon capture and carbon and storage – which have a 50 year record of failure – and carbon removal activities hides the lack of ambition in committing to real action and deep emission cuts today. A ‘net’ target gives the false promise that ‘nature-based solutions’ and speculative technologies for ‘carbon dioxide removal’ will one day suck vast amounts of ongoing carbon pollution out of the atmosphere. But both, temporary carbon storage in soils and forest and technological approaches come with massive uncertainties, risks and limits. Some of those approaches could, if they were implemented at scale, even accelerate the climate and biodiversity crises and put rural communities and resilient food systems at risk. Ecosystem restoration is critical beyond its function as a carbon sink but cannot serve as a substitution for emission reductions.

The European Commission’s new plan for so-called ‘industrial carbon management’ is a smokescreen for continued use of fossil fuels. The plan claims to ‘manage’ the carbon emissions associated with fossil fuels through Carbon Capture Use and Storage (CCUS) technologies. These are the fossil fuel industry’s favourite escape hatch towards inaction and delay. Other promoted ‘carbon management’ technologies, such as Direct Air Capture with Carbon Capture and Storage (DACCS) and Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage (BECCS) are unproven, extremely costly and especially destructive if scaled. Attempts to widely scale-up these technologies risk delaying the needed emission reductions, including by diverting energy and resources.

Choosing a pathway that fails to cut emissions adequately in the near term while handing out new subsidies to the fossil fuel industry is an extremely dangerous gamble and an irresponsible and unjust choice. Including so-called biomass-based removals (such as BECCS and biochar) risks creating a new support mechanism for burning wood at an even larger scale, thereby causing more forest degradation and habitat loss, and harming the climate.

Staying below 1.5°C of warming requires real, just, and immediate reductions. Real climate solutions involve empowering communities and stopping – not accelerating – the scramble for land, power, and profit.

It is clear what Real Zero needs to look like: a just and equitably managed phase-out of fossil fuels; a real reduction of energy consumption for the ultra-rich and for industrialised countries; a transition to fair, democratic and sustainable renewable energy; support for small-scale farmers and for a fair transition from industrial food and agricultural systems towards agroecology and food sovereignty; close-to-nature forestry practices and a reduction of the excessive demand for wood and agricultural commodities; recognition of Indigenous Peoples’ and small farmers’ land rights; and the redirection of public subsidies away from fossil fuels and harmful industrial agriculture and forestry systems to support these measures.

Signed by:

1000 Grandmothers for Future Generations

11 maart beweging

Aalem for Orphan and Vulnerable Children, Inc.

AbibiNsroma Foundation

African CSO Biodiversity Alliance (ACBA)

Agora Association

Amigos de la Tierra España

AnsvarligFremtid

ARA

ARRCC (Australian Religious Response to Climate Change)

Asrori Farm

Association For Promotion Sustainable Development

Association pour la Conservation et la Protection des Écosystèmes des Lacs et l’Agriculture Durable

BI “Saubere Umwelt & Energie Altmark”

Biofuelwatch

Bomenbond

Break Free From Plastic

Broederlijk Delen

Bund für Umwelt und Naturschutz Deutschland e.V. (BUND)

BUND Landesverband Schleswig-Holstein

Canopea

Center for Biological Diversity

Center for International Environmental Law (CIEL)

Centre pour la Justice Environnementale Togo

Citizens’ Institute for Environmental Studies

Civic Response

Clean Air Action Group

Clean Energy Action

Climate Action for Lifelong Learners (CALL)

Climate Action Network Southeast Asia (CANSEA)

Climate Express

Co-ordination Office of the Austrian Bishops’ Conference for International Development and Mission (KOO)

Coastal Plain Conservation Group

Colorado Democratic Party – Energy and Environment Initiative

Comite Schone Lucht

Corporate Europe Observatory

De Klimaatcoalitie

De Landgenoten

Debt Observatory in Globalisation (ODG)

denkhausbremen

Destination Zero

Deutsche Umwelthilfe

DISABILITY PEOPLES FORUM UGANDA

Earth Neighborhood Productions

Earth Thrive

EcoNexus

Ecor.Network

EDSP ECO

Egyptian Green Party

Empower Our Future

Environmental Defence Canada

Environmental Investigation Agency

Environmental Justice Foundation

Euro Coop

European Coordination of La Via Campesina (ECVC)

FDCL – Center for Research and Documentation Chile-Latin America

Federatie tegen Biomassacentrales

Feedback EU

Fern

FIAN Sri Lanka

Food & Water Action Europe

Fresh Eyes

Friends of the Earth Europe

Friends of the Earth International

Friends of the Earth Ireland

Gallifrey Foundation

Global Forest Coalition

Global Justice ecology project

Global Justice Now

Global Missions International

Green Element

Green Global Future

Green Liberty

Green Transition Denmark

Healthy Indoor Environment

Heartpolitics

Hope of Africa (HOFA CAMEROUN)

Human Nature

Indigenous Peoples Global Forum for Sustainable Development, IPGFforSD (International Indigenous Platform)

Ingleside on the Bay Coastal Watch Association

Innovation pour le Développement et la Protection de l’environnement

Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy

Institute for Sustianability, Equity and Resilience,Coventry University

Jordens Vänner / Friends of the Earth Sweden

Klimakultur

KLJB Deutschlands e.V.

Konzeptwerk Neue Ökonomie

Landelijk Netwerk Bossen- en Bomenbescherming

Leefmilieu

Les Amis de la Terre -Togo

Linked.Farm

Living Oceans Society

Natural Justice

No Electricity From Forests

No Plastic In My Sea

NOAH – Friends of the Earth Denmark

Oil Change International

Pakistan Fisherfolk Forum

Philippine Movement for Climate Justice (PMCJ)

Pivot Point

PowerShift Brandenburg e.V.

PowerShift e.V.

Pro REGENWALD

Publish What You Pay

Quantum Leap

Quercus Associação Nacional de Conservação da Natureza

Rapid Transition Alliance

Razom We Stand

Réaction en chaîne humaine

ReCommon

Recourse

Rete Legalità per il clima

Rettet den Regenwald

Rinascimento Green

Rise Up West Virginia (Rise Up WV)

Save Estonia’s Forests

Seas At Risk

SERI Sustainable Europe Research Institute

Shift: Action for Pension Wealth & Planet Health

SOMO

Stay Grounded Network

Sustainable Development Institute-FOE Liberia

Switch It Green

The Climate Reality Project Europe

The Victoria Secular Humanist Association

Third World Network

TRAFFED-DRC

United Kingdom Without Incineration Network

Urgewald e.V.

Voedsel Anders

Vote Climate

Water Justice and Gender

WECF – Women Engage for a Common Future

WhatNext?

Wild Heritage

WISE Netherlands

Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network

Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom UK

YASAVA

Zero Waste Europe

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Categories: G1. Progressive Green

Guardians of Earth’s Tomorrow: The Seed Fairs of Heñói

Wed, 01/31/2024 - 04:15
Guardians of Earth’s Tomorrow
A photo essay series – Part III

 

The Seed Fairs of Heñói is part three of Guardians of Earth’s Tomorrow, a new series of photo essays from the Global Forest Coalition. The current agrifood system, characterized by capitalism and patriarchy, is failing in its basic mission to nourish the world. Simultaneously, it is causing harm to the soil, water, air, and people, severely impacting biodiversity. However, there are examples and glimpses of hope worldwide—indications of a future where food production serves as a means to heal the planet and foster positive relationships among diverse human groups.

Through our series of photo essays entitled “Guardians of the Earth’s Tomorrow,” in collaboration with organizations that are actively creating utopias today, we aim to remind us that not all is lost. We invite you to explore and share these initiatives, joining us on a journey towards much-needed hope during these times of crisis.

 

In the heart of Asunción, Paraguay, two extraordinary fairs took place in 2023 against the backdrop of a fight for food sovereignty: the ‘Heñói Jey Native and Creole Seed Fair’ and the ‘Karú Soberano Fair’, which means ‘Sovereign Eating’ in the Guaraní language. They were organised under the guidance and leadership of the Heñói Seed Network. At these fairs, seeds emerge not just as agricultural treasures but as custodians of a profound legacy. 

All photos in this essay are courtesy of the Heñói Center for Studies and Promotion of Democracy, Human Rights and Socio-environmental Sustainability, Paraguay.

Click on the links to download the photo essay in English and Spanish.

Click here to view the interactive online version in English.

Or continue scrolling to view it right here on the GFC Website.

 

The post Guardians of Earth’s Tomorrow: The Seed Fairs of Heñói appeared first on Global Forest Coalition.

Categories: G1. Progressive Green

Хранители завтрашнего дня Земли: Проект TreeBox

Wed, 01/24/2024 - 23:09

Проект TreeBox – это вторая часть новой серии фотоочерков “Хранители завтрашнего дня Земли”, подготовленной Глобальной лесной коалицией. Современная агропродовольственная система, характеризующаяся капитализмом и патриархатом, не справляется со своей основной миссией – питать мир. Одновременно она наносит вред почве, воде, воздуху и людям, серьезно нарушая биоразнообразие. Однако в мире есть примеры и проблески надежды – свидетельства будущего, в котором производство продуктов питания служит средством оздоровления планеты и укрепления позитивных отношений между различными человеческими группами.

С помощью серии фотоэссе под названием “Хранители завтрашнего дня Земли”, подготовленных в сотрудничестве с организациями, которые активно создают утопии сегодня, мы хотим напомнить, что не все потеряно. Мы приглашаем вас изучить эти инициативы и поделиться ими, присоединившись к нам в путешествии к столь необходимой надежде в эти кризисные времена.

Проект TreeBox – это уникальная инициатива НПО “Армянские леса”, которая сочетает в себе устойчивое сельское хозяйство, защиту окружающей среды и гендерную справедливость. Он позволяет людям посадить лес в Армении, просто заказав коробку здоровой веганской еды.

Для получения дополнительной информации посетите сайт: https://www.facebook.com/TreeBoxArmenia.

TreeBox стремится к расширению своей деятельности. Чтобы поддержать их, свяжитесь с ними через Facebook, по телефону [+374 41 900799] или по электронной почте [forest@treebox.am].

Все фотографии в этом очерке были сделаны в разных областях Армении общественной организацией “Армянские леса”.

Видеоролик о TreeBox можно посмотреть здесь: https://www.facebook.com/TreeBoxArmenia/videos/2034198713436325.

Нажмите на ссылки, чтобы скачать фоторепортаж на английском и русском языках.

Нажмите здесь, чтобы просмотреть интерактивную онлайн-версию на английском языке.

Или продолжайте прокручивать страницу, чтобы просмотреть ее прямо здесь, на сайте GFC.

 

The post Хранители завтрашнего дня Земли: Проект TreeBox appeared first on Global Forest Coalition.

Categories: G1. Progressive Green

Guardians of Earth’s Tomorrow: The TreeBox Project

Wed, 01/24/2024 - 23:08
Click here to read this page in Russian.

 

Guardians of Earth’s Tomorrow
A photo essay series – Part II

 

The TreeBox Project is part two of Guardians of Earth’s Tomorrow, a new series of photo essays from the Global Forest Coalition. The current agrifood system, characterized by capitalism and patriarchy, is failing in its basic mission to nourish the world. Simultaneously, it is causing harm to the soil, water, air, and people, severely impacting biodiversity. However, there are examples and glimpses of hope worldwide—indications of a future where food production serves as a means to heal the planet and foster positive relationships among diverse human groups.

Through our series of photo essays entitled “Guardians of the Earth’s Tomorrow,” in collaboration with organizations that are actively creating utopias today, we aim to remind us that not all is lost. We invite you to explore and share these initiatives, joining us on a journey towards much-needed hope during these times of crisis.

 

The TreeBox Project is a unique initiative by Armenian Forests NGO that combines sustainable agriculture, environmental protection, and gender justice. It allows people to plant a forest in Armenia simply by ordering a box of healthy vegan food.

For more information, visit: https://www.facebook.com/TreeBoxArmenia

TreeBox is looking to expand their operations. To support them, reach out via Facebook , phone [+374 41 900799] or email [forest@treebox.am]

All photos in this essay were taken in different provinces in Armenia, by Armenian Forests NGO.

You can watch a video on TreeBox here: https://www.facebook.com/TreeBoxArmenia/videos/2034198713436325

 

Click on the links to Download the photo essay in English and Russian.

Click here to view the interactive online version in English.

Or continue scrolling to view it right here on the GFC Website.

 

The post Guardians of Earth’s Tomorrow: The TreeBox Project appeared first on Global Forest Coalition.

Categories: G1. Progressive Green

Guardians of Earth’s Tomorrow: Agromandala

Wed, 01/17/2024 - 01:52
Guardians of Earth’s Tomorrow
A photo essay series

Agromandala is part one of Guardians of Earth’s Tomorrow, a new series of photo essays from the Global Forest Coalition. The current agrifood system, characterized by capitalism and patriarchy, is failing in its basic mission to nourish the world. Simultaneously, it is causing harm to the soil, water, air, and people, severely impacting biodiversity. However, there are examples and glimpses of hope worldwide—indications of a future where food production serves as a means to heal the planet and foster positive relationships among diverse human groups.

Through our series of photo essays titled “Guardians of the Earth’s Tomorrow,” in collaboration with organizations that are actively creating utopias today, we aim to remind us that not all is lost. We invite you to explore and share these initiatives, joining us on a journey towards much-needed hope during these times of crisis.

Agromandala is a Colombian agroecological project that grows, harvests and markets fresh and processed foods 100% free of pesticides and cared for with all respect and love. For more information visit: https://www.agromandala.com.co/

Click on the links to Download the photo essay in English and Spanish.

Click here to view the interactive online version in English.

Or continue scrolling to view the laid-out version right here on the GFC Website.

 

The post Guardians of Earth’s Tomorrow: Agromandala appeared first on Global Forest Coalition.

Categories: G1. Progressive Green

GFC is hiring for the role of Director

Fri, 01/05/2024 - 03:22

The Global Forest Coalition (GFC) is seeking an experienced Director to provide strategic direction for the organization and oversee the coordination and implementation of our mission and policies across GFC’s four main campaigns: Gender Justice and Forests; Climate Justice; Extractive Industries, Tourism and Infrastructure; and Unsustainable Livestock Production.

About GFC

The GFC is an international coalition of NGOs and Indigenous Peoples’ Organizations defending social justice and the rights of forest peoples in forest policies. GFC was founded in 2000 by 19 member organizations and has grown to include 126 groups in 73 countries. We participate in international forest policy meetings and organize joint advocacy campaigns on issues like Indigenous Peoples’ rights, the need for socially-just forest policy and addressing the underlying causes of forest loss.

Our mission is to advocate for the conservation and restoration of forest ecosystems through defending and promoting respect for the rights, territories, traditional knowledge and sustainable livelihoods of the Indigenous Peoples, local communities and women that co-exist with them.

About the Role

Title: Director

Job Type: 24 hours a week

Starting date: March 2024

Location: This position is remote. GFC is a global organization. Occasional travel is required for relevant international events.

Remuneration: The employment will be on the basis of a special service agreement at a rate of 32.50 € per hour.

Responsibilities
  • Providing leadership, along with other staff and partner organizations, in the development and implementation of policy priorities and strategy.
  • Supporting campaign coordinators where needed, including in strategic planning, fundraising, budget administration, and reporting matters. 
  • Following up on the main global debates related to the defence of territories, the threats of climate change, the impacts of extractive industries on vulnerable populations, especially women, and other issues related to environmental disputes on the planet. 
  • Reviewing narrative and financial reports to donors and ensuring that they are consistent with the project proposals submitted to donors.
  • Supporting the Controller of Finance and Operations in ensuring coherence between campaign needs, budget and team care.
  • Overseeing the hiring and onboarding of new campaign coordinators when needed, in collaboration with the Controller of Finance and Operations and existing campaign staff.
  • Planning monthly Advisory Council (staff) meetings. 
  • Coordinating the annual Monitoring, Evaluation and Planning meeting for staff. 
  • Serving as a resource for member groups and encouraging their participation, in coordination with regional focal points and the Membership Coordinator, including at Members’ Assemblies.
  • Receiving and integrating requests by member organisations.
  • Supporting the GFC Board of Directors in planning, organizing and reporting on their meetings. 
  • Coordinating larger cross-cutting fundraising proposals, in close collaboration with relevant campaign coordinators and member organizations. 
  • Following discussions in the Advisory Council and communications team.
  • Representing GFC in the media and at international meetings and conferences, including in civil society spaces at conferences as determined by the campaign coordinators.
  • Ensuring effective communication within the team and making decisions based on consensus.
  • Supporting the communications team, the campaign coordinators, or GFC members in writing and publishing policy briefings, op-ed articles or other relevant publications.
Qualifications
  • Profound affinity with and knowledge of the mission, vision, objectives, strategies and campaigns of GFC, and commitment to feminist values. 
  • Knowing of the main networks of IPLCs and environmental CSOs.
  • At least 10 years’ experience coordinating international campaigns focused on advocating for rights-based, gender-just policies to address the drivers of deforestation, ecosystems and biodiversity loss, including climate justice issues.
  • Proven experience with fundraising and donor relations.
  • Proven affinity with working for a multicultural coalition of NGOs, grassroots organizations, women’s rights groups and Indigenous Peoples Organizations.
  • Good working knowledge of the drivers of deforestation, biodiversity conservation, gender transformative and intersectionality approach, Indigenous Peoples’ and local community rights, food sovereignty and climate justice and feminist perspectives.
  • Profound knowledge of global and regional policies related to forests; unsustainable livestock production and food systems; social and environmental justice; climate justice, extractive activities and agro-commodities.
  • Self-starter able to grasp complex forest-related policy frameworks, rights-based approaches and environmental policy issues.
  • Strong understanding of campaign strategies, management and Planning, Monitoring, Evaluation, and Learning (PMEL).
  • Professional, creative, with great interpersonal and problem-solving skills.
  • Self-motivated and organized, with strong communication skills and the ability to plan, organize and prioritize multiple projects and respect tight deadlines.
  • Fluency in English; Spanish, Russian, French or another major language is an advantage.
To Apply

Please send your CV and a cover letter outlining your suitability for the role with the subject heading: “Application: Policy Director Position” to gfc@globalforestcoalition.org. We particularly encourage GFC affiliates (current and former staff, contractors, representatives of member groups, etc.) to apply. GFC is an equal opportunity employer and is committed to providing all people with equal access to employment and volunteer opportunities. We strive for gender and regional diversity in our team and an increased number of Indigenous team members. 

Closing date for applications: January 28, 2024

The post GFC is hiring for the role of Director appeared first on Global Forest Coalition.

Categories: G1. Progressive Green

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