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E2. Front Line Community Green

“When We Change How We Are Being, We Transform the Doing.”

Climate Justice Alliance - Wed, 11/14/2018 - 14:43

By Angela Adrar, Executive Director of the Climate Justice Alliance

Photo: North Carolina Climate Justice Summit, 2014

The power of the Climate Justice Alliance has always been our members and our desire to consult, envision creative solutions, and take action together when it matters most. For one of our newest members, the North Carolina Climate Justice Collective (NCCJC), claiming the term “collective” was an intentional process that deeply embodies their movement building principles. The origin of NCCJC, which now includes a broad spectrum of over 1,000 volunteer youth and adults and about 50 organizations, parallels CJA’s formation process. By valuing relationships and the self-determination of communities, collectively CJA and NCCJC are building generative power.

For NCCJC, their heart is cultural organizing and popular education. These two powerful strategies build capacity for collective imagination, which is manifested as collective action that moves us toward collective liberation. By engaging across and with a broad spectrum of folks in North Carolina, NCCJC centers frontline community leadership as they deepen and strengthen the roots of their diverse communities.

“When we change how we are being, we transform the doing. That’s what cultural transformation is all about.” explains Jodi Lasseter, Founder & Co-Convener of the North Carolina Climate Justice Collective.

But what does the commitment to profound cultural transformation actually look like in practice?

A beautiful example of building generative power is through NCCJC’s popular education roadshow called The Good Fire.

As an allegory, The Good Fire inspires embodied learning about energy democracy principles. The good fire is energy. It feeds us, inspires, and builds stronger community relationships in contrast to the bad fires of devastation and division from a nightmare legacy of toxic fossil fuel extraction. Conceptualizing Just Transition concepts through theatre, metaphor, song, food, art, and active participation supports communities to find their own agency, narratives, and solutions. NCCJC is currently using this powerful storytelling for North Carolinians impacted by Hurricane Florence. By making tangible meaning out of widespread collective trauma, folks can begin to heal. They are making powerful connections between their lived experiences and the ravages of the “bad fire.”

NCCJC knows that telling these stories exposes the truth about who is responsible for harm to our people and planet. Such popular education fuels an ongoing campaign against utility monopoly Duke Energy, the main driver of the “bad fire” in North Carolina and the #1 greenhouse gas emitter in the United States. Power without accountability corrupts.

It takes resilience to stay in this fight for the long haul.

NCCJC is consciously developing a more resilient, healthy movement infrastructure. Through their Resilience Hubs, anchored by frontline community organizations, NCCJC is creating space to deepen inner and outer resiliency skills. This includes racial justice and anti-oppression trainings, mindfulness, and healing justice circles. NCCJC supports the growth and health of their communities by organizing opportunities that help people stay connected to their collective vision of liberation.

There is also a focus on “outer resilience,” or active learning and teaching skills to thrive, like how to create your own water catchment systems, get your community-based solar system off the ground, or set up a new co-op enterprise in your neighborhood. The Resilience Hubs are all about the self-determination of a community’s food, water, and energy rights, and also transportation, housing, and sustainable jobs. These are the interdependent issues that make a climate justice framework so powerful.

NCCJC’s annual summit takes all that generated good energy and intentionally weaves the work of the Resilience Hubs from around the state. Their annual summit, like CJA’s bi-annual national convening, is a space for participants to co-create joint projects, share translocal learning, and develop authentic relationships across differences of identity and strategy. The cumulation of these shared experiences is the antidote to divide and conquer politics. By continuing to practice trust through shared values, we can come into our whole selves as individuals, as members of an organization, and as a movement.

That is what cultural transformation looks like—and your support to NCCJC and CJA is profoundly changing the culture that has been designed to alienate us from each other.

As we approach the end of the year, we at CJA are committed to intensifying and strengthening our ability to stay true to our guiding principles and, in particular, continuing to support members like NCCJC during crises, such as Hurricane Florence, along with the bold and visionary solutions and actions necessary to fight the bad and build the new. This is why we are launching our end-of-the-year giving campaign with allies, friends, and supporters to ensure that we build a base of support that is sustainable and strengthens our ability to continue putting frontline communities first.

Won’t you lend your support and donate to the Climate Justice Alliance? Make a contribution or become a monthly supporter to CJA today?

In critical times such as these, when climate disasters are a regular occurrence and our ability to ensure fair elections is waning to say the least, we also ask that you support those on the frontlines directly.  This month we ask you to do this by donating to NCCJC. In so doing, you are part of this bold and visionary cultural transformation.

                                                                                                                           

The post “When We Change How We Are Being, We Transform the Doing.” appeared first on Climate Justice Alliance.

Urgent Call from Brazil’s Landless Workers Movement, Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra (MST)

Climate Justice Alliance - Tue, 11/13/2018 - 20:37
URGENT CALL – judge ordered the eviction of 450 families of Quilombo Campo Grande Camp and established a seven-day deadline to have his order executed

Dear comrades and Friends

First of all, on behalf of the MST and the 450 families of Quilombo Campo Grande Camp, we thank all solidarity letters received against the eviction of our camp.

Unfortunately, during a hearing held on Wednesday afternoon, Nov. 7, Brazilian judge Walter Zwicker Esbaille Junior ordered the eviction of 450 families who live in the area of the old Ariadnópolis mill owned by a bankrupt debtor in the city of Campo do Meio, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil.

He established a seven-day deadline to have his order executed. The decision means destroying 1,200 hectares (nearly 3,000 acres) of corn, beans, manioc, and pumpkin crops, 40 hectares (roughly 100 acres) of agroecological gardens, and 520 hectares (more than 1,200 acres) of coffee crops. Not only that, hundreds of homes, corrals, and miles and miles of fences will be torn down. The court order will destroy everything people have built in two decades of hard work.

According to the lawyers representing the families, the judge’s ruling is arbitrary and hurts constitutional principles by not recognizing values of human dignity. The hearing was unusual. Representatives of the families who live in the camp and authorities who traveled to attend it were not allowed in. While holding the session, the judge called the riot police to the room. Representatives of big farms and the local government wanted the families to be taken to a gymnasium. The judge eventually quickly rendered his judgment.

The Landless Workers’ Movement (MST) is appealing this arbitrary, unfair decision. We reiterate our will to continue to struggle and resist yet another attack by the old mill.

The case is now in the State Justice Tribunal.

We are aware that the fascist inclinations of the project recently elected to run Brazil will lead to increasing use of State apparatus to criminalize us and segregate the landless people – as well as urban communities. But the Brazilian people is brave and strong. We have faced the military dictatorship since the birth of the movement. It’s with this story and this courage that the families living in Quilombo Campo Grande will resist and stay in the Ariadnópolis land. A preliminary injunction to remove them will not erase so many years of struggle.

Once more, we urge all organizations, supporters and friends to send the message below to the State Justice Tribunal Judge Nelson Missias de Morais, demanding that the repossession action to be dismissed:

gapre@tjmg.jus.br
contato@crdhsulmg.com.br

À atenção do Exmo. Sr. Juiz Nelson Missias de Morais

Venho me manifestar sobre a ação de restituição de posse n ° 0024.11.188.917-6 inscrita no dia 06/07/2011.

Peço que a ação de restituição da posse seja suspensa, já que existem 450 famílias, mais de 2.000 pessoas, que já estão na posse da área há mais de 20 anos. Essas pessoas têm casas construídas, vasta produção e reprodução da vida neste lugar.

A resolução do conflito só pode ocorrer com a permanência das familias, que já tem a posse da terra por direito.

Nós [insert your name or name of your organization], apelamos para que Voissa Excelencia resolva o conflito. Por justiça e em defesa dos princípios constitucionais, pela valorização da vida e da dignidade humana, apelamos!

Estamos diante da iminência de um massacre em Minas Gerais e você pode salvar essas vidas.

TRANSLATION:

Dear Honorable Judge Nelson Missias de Morais,

The purpose of this e-mail is to express my concern about the action for repossession No. 0024.11.188.917-6 filed on June 17, 2011.

I strongly and respectfully ask you to suspend the action for repossession, because there are 450 families, more than 2,000 people, who have been in possession of the area for more than 20 years. They have built their homes and their production and reproduction of life in that place.

The resolution of this conflict can only be successful if they stay where they are, as it is their right.

We [insert your name or name of your organization] urge you to do this. For justice and in defense of constitutional principles, out of respect for human life and dignity, we urge you!

There can be a massacre in Minas Gerais and you can save those lives.

ABOUT THE CASE: Who is Justice serving?

By ordering the removal of families who live in the Quilombo Campo Grande camp, the Brazilian state hurts long-standing human rights resolutions

From the MST Page

In 1998, 450 Landless families occupied an area of the Ariadnópolis mill, in the city of Campo do Meio, southern Minas Gerais, Brazil. Back then, the area was owned by Companhia Agropecuária Irmãos Azevedo (CAPIA), which owes R$300 million (roughly US$80 million), went bankrupt, and faced closure two years before the families occupied the land in 1996.

Time went by and the four thousand hectares (roughly ten thousand acres) where there used to be nothing but monoculture of sugar cane started to come to life and allow two thousand people to work and earn a living.

They called the camp Quilombo Campo Grande, where today one of the largest coffee cooperatives in the state is based: Guaií. The co-op produces 510 metric tons of coffee a year – an average 8,500 coffee sacks –, as well as 55,000 corn sacks and 8,000 bean sacks. Not only that, forty hectares (nearly one hundred acres) in the area are dedicated to a garden where they grow vegetables to feed the families who live in the camp and local communities.

The camp also has 60,000 fruit trees and more than 60,000 native trees.

Over the years, the families have worked hard to build their houses with no support from the government, organizing and working the land for decades, resisting in a territory the State considers bankruptcy estate.

Now all the social change brought about in Campo do Meio is under threat. Last Wednesday, Nov. 7, a court in the judicial district of Campos Gerais ordered the repossession of the land and the removal of all families who live there. Apparently all victories achieved during the years of democratic regime in Brazil have not actually become concrete: the State found on paper is not part of landless workers’ life.

Selective justice

The court decision was based on State Decree No. 365/2015, which established the expropriation of 3,195 hectares (7895 acres) of the debtor, Ariadnópolis Mill, paying R$66 million (approximately US$17.5 million) to the Companhia Agropecuária Irmãos Azevedo (CAPIA). Two months ago, the families who live in Quilombo Campo Grande negotiated an agreement in which the State made a commitment to pay the money in five installments.

However, the company’s shareholders, supported by local big landowners and rural caucus, did not take the deal and took the case to court against the Minas Gerais state government to overturn the decree, even though it had been upheld in two different trials.

In a judicial operation, the stakeholders brought back an injunction to remove occupants from 2012, regarding the mill’s bankruptcy proceedings. The injunction was not granted by the Supreme Court at the time, but was not dismissed.

This week, hearing it as an inconsistently urgent case, the assistant judge working as a substitute in a rural court in Minas Gerais, Walter Zwicker Esbaille Júnior, established that the landless workers have until November 14 to vacate the area and authorized the Minas Gerais State military police to enforce it.

The same decision recognizes the area is being used and farmed by the families, but disregards article 184 of Brazil’s Constitution, which establishes that expropriating, in the public interest, rural estate that is not fulfilling the social function of property for agrarian reform purposes is federal jurisdiction.

A lawyer and coordinator of the human rights organization Terra de Direitos, Darci Frigo argued that, by ordering the eviction, the court is disregarding Resolution No. 10, from October 17, 2018, of the National Human Rights Council, which establishes solutions to guarantee rights and provisional remedies in cases of collective rural and urban conflicts.

“The resolution aims to guide authorities and public institutions that handle cases of collective conflicts regarding possession [of land]. They are measures that must be adopted so that a group is not violated,” Frigo said. The lawyer argued that the judge, who has to abide by this resolution, has to adopt and consider a series of measures to reach agreements that fulfill the social function of the property, as established in the Constitution.

Frigo points out the nation-state developed over the last centuries is unable to enforce the law established in the Constitution, which, in Brazil’s case, is to guarantee fundamental rights like citizenship and human dignity – rights that are being denied to the families in this process.

Brazil is signatory to several international treaties, such as the International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights adopted by 21st Session of the General Assembly of the United Nations on December 19th, 1966. This covenant establishes that its members must work to grant economic, social, and cultural rights to their citizens, including the right to work, health, education, and decent living.

“The question is: is this right being granted and respected in the case of the Quilombo Campo Grande occupation? The government must lead a peaceful, definitive resolution for the conflicts, giving precedence to maintaining vulnerable groups in the areas where they live and claim. The eviction is not inevitable. Actually the State found a legal solution for the case when it issued the decree for public interest purposes. What happened was that anti-agrarian reform political forces – whether big estate owners or ideological forces – found grounds in the court system to put the right to property before human rights,” the jurist warns.

What Brazil advocates as a State by signing human rights resolutions is that the rights of this group must come before the right to property. The social function of this territory will only be truly fulfilled when the families are settled in the area. The judges responsible for the case must be presented with that so their decision is based on higher interests to fulfill Brazil’s responsibility to human rights.

The MST is appealing the court’s decision and the families reiterate their eagerness to keep struggling and resisting against yet another attack by the project that has been elected in Brazil, which aims to increasingly use all State apparatus to criminalize and further segregate the landless people.

The post Urgent Call from Brazil’s Landless Workers Movement, Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra (MST) appeared first on Climate Justice Alliance.

Power Beyond the Polls: Reflecting on the 2018 Election

Asian Pacific Environmental Network - Tue, 11/13/2018 - 10:10

The election is over, but our movement keeps growing. Read on for a reflection on the 2018 elections by APEN’s Political Director, Mabel Lam.

So much happened this week. We won hard-fought victories and faced heartbreaking losses. Now is the time to celebrate, to mourn, to reflect with focus and grace — and to recommit to building the movement we know is possible.

In Oakland, the campaign for Measure Y was outspent 17-to-1 by its opponents — and yet we won, passing Measure Y and expanding just cause eviction protections to tenants in duplexes and triplexes. In Richmond, we helped pass Measure H, taxing luxury real estate to fund vital youth services and ensure city jobs pay living wages.

APEN canvassers at our Oakland office

These wins at the ballot box are important, but even more important is the movement we are continuing to build. In Richmond and Oakland, our team of 40 canvassers had conversations with 7,273 voters over 25 days — and that’s not counting the countless people our members and supporters (you!) engaged by talking about the election with friends, family, and neighbors.

I am so proud of the work we did on these campaigns — and I am so thankful for the movement we are building together. We are building power beyond the polls: a growing movement of working-class Asian American immigrants and refugees who believe that all people should have access to clean air, living wages, and safe and affordable housing. We’re getting stronger every day.

Photo by Eurydice Galka

While we celebrate our victories and look to the future, we must take time to mourn and learn from our losses together. Proposition 10, which would have given our cities the power to expand rent control, did not pass.

This loss is hard to bear. A majority of Californians support rent control, but corporate landlords and real estate groups spent $80 million on a campaign of misinformation and manipulation to defeat Proposition 10. Sometimes, we can overcome their money — but sometimes we can’t.

It’s easy to see role money played in defeating Prop 10 and feel dispirited. But then I remember that getting Prop 10 on the ballot would have been unimaginable just a few years ago. When I look at the movement we are creating — the broad coalition of tenants and homeowners ready to throw down for rent control at the ballot box and beyond — I am confident that this fight has only just begun.

APEN Leader Li Hui Zhen distributes voter guides in Chinatown

We will keep organizing. We will show up at legislators’ offices and at our neighbor’s doorstep. We will keep taking this movement beyond the polls: not just showing up the day before an election but showing up throughout the year, and talking to our neighbors about the issues that affect all of our families. And when the next election comes, we will be stronger than we are today.

Despite this loss, we saw some big victories at the state level Tuesday: Propositions 5 and 6, which would have cut funding for schools, local services, and transportation infrastructure, both failed by large margins.

Defeating Proposition 5 is huge. Since passing in 1978, Proposition 13 has drained critical funds from our schools and local governments — and Prop 5 would have deepened these cuts to education and social services.

But we’re not going to stop with defeating Prop 5. We can do more to expand funding for California’s schools and social services. That is why we will be supporting the California Schools and Local Communities Funding Act in 2020, which will restore $11 billion a year to our schools, colleges, and vital local services.

Every day, we come closer and closer to winning the future our communities deserve — both at the polls and beyond. Thank you for joining me in this struggle.

In solidarity,

Mabel Lam
Asian Pacific Environmental Network

Join us in building power beyond the polls by donating to APEN today.

Meet our Members ZWE edition – ZW North West

Zero Waste North West

 

Interview with Maeve O’Neil, chair of Zero Waste North West

by Yianna Sigalou

Hi Maeve, can you give us a brief introduction to Zero Waste North West’s focus?

Zero Waste North West formed in March 2013 to oppose plans for a municipal waste incinerator at Strathfoyle, just outside Derry City in the North West of Ireland. It threatened our air, water and soil and would be a local driver for climate change, creating demand for ‘waste’ to burn for 25 years. Incineration had been rejected twice by the Derry public (DuPont toxic waste incinerator – 1991, and a municipal waste incinerator – 2002), so this time our opposition had to be within the context of what we were for. We researched the solutions to our waste generation crisis and committed to work with council and the local community to implement them. The solutions required a culture shift in attitude and behaviour towards resources, transitioning from our linear, extractivist, throwaway lifestyle to one compatible with a zero waste circular economy (ZWCE). “It’s not waste until it’s wasted!”

After a year of lobbying and creative campaigning council abandoned plans for the incinerator. We joined ZWE and invited its leading experts to Derry’s first international conference on zero waste, Countdown To Zero. We secured funding and jointly commissioned research with council that would build the business case for transitioning council’s current collection system to one that facilitates a ZWCE.  The final report and resulting strategy won unanimous endorsement from council in December 2017.

We are now beginning to work with council on the proper implementation of the ZWCE strategy. We independently work in the community, in schools and with businesses to model ZWCE practice by promoting: waste prevention, e.g. Our Naw To Straws campaign,  Journey To Zero support for local cafes and other businesses waste reduction through better design e.g. Zero Waste Shop more ways to recycle our ‘waste’ e.g. Local old biro collection points for recycling with Terracycle.  We have a Zero Waste Juniors Club and a vibrant community events calendar to foster a love of the earth (tree planting, Earth Hour, A Festival, Litterpicking etc…) Our Facebook page helps to spread awareness and supports Zero Waste Lifestyle options for both individuals/businesses.

How long have you been in the field? And what got you into (zero) waste?

I have always had a level of environmental consciousness with my dad being active in Derry’s first anti-incinerator campaign, attending rallies from the age of 3. However, it wasn’t until I returned to Derry in 2014, having lived in Scotland for 8 years, that I began to get involved in various types of activism in the city. A chance encounter brought me to zero waste, through a conversation with the then chair Judi Logue when I was just having a wander around the local community centres in the town. And I’ve been hooked ever since. For me, climate justice is at the heart of my politics, as without an inhabitable planet, nothing else matters, and a healthier planet requires the type of transformational system change that has the potential to lead to healthier, happier and more equal societies. Zero waste is part of the solution and something worth fighting for.

Tell us more about one ongoing campaign/activity you’re working on?

We are currently supporting our local council to effectively implement the Zero Waste Circular Economy Strategy. This has been a real relationship building experience as we were wary of how council would work with us and vice versa, however the meetings have been going very positively and we are feeling more and more like valued partners within this process rather than a blue eyed dreamers nagging at council. A quiet revolution is happening within council and council workers are now sharing our vision for a zero waste future for our city. We have been meeting with local elected representatives, the mayor and other groups with influence on how the strategy will be adopted to explain what zero waste is and how it can be most effectively implemented to the economic, health and social benefits to our region.

We are also continuing our work in communities and on the ground, raising awareness of zero waste and general environmental consciousness. We always try to be as creative as possible in our actions, not only as it helps engage the general public, but it also nourishes us as activists. Right now we are getting ready for the Halloween Parade in the city, building a giant whale from willow, who will be killed by plastic, and we will carry it and mourn it in the parade as sea creatures, being led by Manannan Mac Lir, God of the Sea from Irish mythology. It is the one time of the year we can shine the light on our scary relationship with plastic, as we are much more positive and empowering throughout the rest of the year.

I am also working alongside other environmental and campaigning groups to organise a big environmental march and rally to bring the issue of environmental protection forward in Northern Ireland. It is the first attempt at a march like this, and it will take the same route as the original civil rights march route in Derry, which just marked its 50th anniversary this month.

 

If there was one thing that you would like your organisation to be known for, what would it be?

It would be absolutely amazing if we were able to help implement the Zero Waste Circular Economy Strategy in a way that our region could become the green capital of Ireland and the UK, leading the way in resource management and in a way that brought economic prosperity to our region which has been so often neglected, like other amazing zero waste cities in

 

You can find more about Zero Waste North West and their work here.

 

Green groups challenge ADB to innovate, not incinerate

Mandaluyong City, Philippines, 9 November 2018 — Green groups today challenged the Asian Development Bank (ADB) to live up to its stated mandate and stop financing any form of waste incineration. Incineration, including so-called “waste-to-energy” (WTE) incineration, is a dangerous, costly, and unsustainable method of treating waste. The groups contend that ADB is flouting local and international laws by promoting incineration, and that the bank should facilitate—instead of obstruct—Asia-Pacific’s transition toward a sustainable circular economy.

The call came during the launch of the report ADB and Waste Incineration: Bankrolling Pollution; Blocking Solutions [1] published by the Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA). The report is a critical review of how ADB promotes investments in WTE incineration despite documented negative impacts of these facilities on public health, environment, economy, and the climate.[2] Joining the launch to call for the bank to pull out of waste incineration funding were No Burn Pilipinas, EcoWaste Coalition, Break Free From Plastic, Greenpeace, Healthcare Without Harm, and the Philippine Movement for Climate Justice (PMCJ).

“Incinerator financing is a classic example of ADB’s schizophrenic funding policy,” said Lea Guerrero, GAIA climate and clean energy campaigner. “The bank is using public money to promote dirty and destructive projects that serve to prevent countries in the region from pursuing solutions that conserve resources, protect health and which do not harm the climate. This report challenges ADB to innovate, not incinerate: the world is already moving away from incineration and transitioning to a sustainable circular economy. ADB should follow suit and fund just, equitable Zero Waste systems that will enable this transition.”

The report shows that WTE incinerator facilities advanced by ADB present significant investment risks, fail to comply with key provisions of the bank’s safeguard standards as well as core pillars of the bank’s poverty reduction strategy, and present a lack of accountability to the very people within member countries it is mandated to serve. In Asia, the bank is the leading agency that is bringing the failed incineration model from the Global North. It also proactively partners with waste incineration companies to build WTE incinerators in the region. These facilities lock countries into enormous (and onerous) debts for environmentally and publicly harmful projects with exploitative “put-or-pay” contracts that obstruct the adoption of best practices for dealing with resources and waste.

Among incineration projects funded by ADB are incinerator facilities in China and Vietnam. The bank also recommends waste incineration to other countries through its technical assistance (TA) projects, such as in the Philippines.

“In the Philippines, ADB’s pro-incinerator policies contravene the country’s Clean Air, Ecological Solid Waste Management, and Renewable Energy laws,” said Glenn Ymata, No Burn Pilipinas campaign manager. “Aside from clearly going against its safeguard standards, ADB is potentially locking cities and municipalities, already stretched for funds, into decades of wastage and indebtedness. It is business as usual for ADB and it has been the same  for over 50 years.”

Last October, the bank announced that its lending portfolio has no place for “dirty energy”.[3] Green groups assert that WTE incineration is dirty energy and should not be financed by the bank. “ADB’s funding of incinerators is based on the industry lie that WTE incineration is renewable energy,” said  of PMCJ. “WTE incineration is polluting, carbon intensive, and takes investments away from real RE solutions. It should not be part of the ADB’s portfolio.”###

 

Read the Executive Summary HERE.

 

CONTACT

  • Sherma Benosa | Communications Officer, GAIA Asia Pacific | +63 9178157570  sherma@no-burn.org

 

NOTE TO EDITORS

[1] http://www.no-burn.org/wp-content/uploads/ADB-and-Waste-Incineration-GAIA-Nov2018.pdf

[2] The report highlights that incinerators 1) have adverse impacts on the health and wellbeing of people and the environment ; 2) contribute to climate change; 3) damage local and national economies; and 4) obstruct resource sustainability. WTE incineration is the most expensive way to manage waste and generate electricity and perpetuate the unsustainable “take, make, waste” linear economic model that abets climate change and pollution. At present, incinerator and WTE incinerator facilities are seeing a phaseout in Europe in recognition that incineration is not compatible with a sustainable, low-carbon, and resource-efficient circular economy.

[3] https://www.adb.org/news/op-ed/no-place-dirty-energy-adb-s-climate-vision-yongping-zhai

Únete a GAIA

La mayor fortaleza de GAIA reside en nuestra membresía, que incluye organizaciones líderes que trabajan en la intersección de la protección ambiental, el desarrollo sostenible y los derechos humanos.

Los miembros de GAIA pueden ser grupos y colectivos de base, organizaciones sin fines de lucro, o alianzas de grupos que trabajan activamente en temas de residuos. Como norma general, GAIA no acepta grupos con conflictos de intereses claros, como organizaciones políticas o empresas. Sin embargo, aquellas empresas sociales cuyo trabajo esté alineado con la misión y visión de GAIA, promuevan iniciativas que beneficien a sus comunidades y que incorporen los principios de justicia social y ambiental en sus operaciones pueden ser admitidas como miembros. Esto puede incluir organizaciones dirigidas por trabajadoras/es y cooperativas de trabajo. Valoramos especialmente la participación de colectivos y sindicatos de recicladoras/es.

La Misión de GAIA:

GAIA es una alianza mundial de más de 800 grupos de base, organizaciones no gubernamentales, y personas en más de 90 países, cuya visión fundamental es un mundo justo, libre de tóxicos y sin incineración. Sabemos que los recursos finitos de nuestro planeta, frágil biosfera, y la salud de las personas y otros seres vivos están en peligro debido a la contaminación y a las prácticas ineficientes de producción y métodos de disposición que ponen en peligro la salud. Por esta razón, nos oponemos a los incineradores, vertederos y otroas intervenciones de etapa final. Nuestri objetivo es la producción limpia y creación de un ciclo cerrado, una economía con materiales eficientes en la que todos los productos se reutilicen, reparen, o reciclen. 

Formularios de solicitud de membresía:

A continuación puede encontrar los formularios de solicitud de membresía para Organizaciones, Redes y ALianzas, e Individuos. Asegúrese de haber leído y aceptado la Misión y Acuerdos de GAIA.

Debido al gran volumen de solicitudes, las aplicaciones para las regiones de África – Medio Oriente, Asia – Pacífico, y Estados Unidos – Canadá, se revisarán trimestralmente en Enero, Abril, Julio y Octubre (el día 15 de cada mes). 

Organizaciones Redes y Alianzas Individuos

Personas individuales – Formulario membresía

  • Ha leído y acepta la misión y acuerdos de GAIA?*
  • Nombre y apellidos* Nombre Apellidos
  • Está afiliada/o a alguna organización? Si sí, cuál?*
  • Correo electrónico*
  • Página web / Facebook
  • Número de teléfono*
  • Dirección* Calle y número Ciudad Estado / Provincia / Región Código postal AfghanistanAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBrazilBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaColombiaComorosCongo, Democratic Republic of theCongo, Republic of theCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEast TimorEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFaroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench PolynesiaGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuamGuatemalaGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiNorth KoreaSouth KoreaKosovoKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMauritaniaMauritiusMexicoMicronesiaMoldovaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSaint MartinSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint MaartenSlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSpainSri LankaSudanSudan, SouthSurinameSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTogoTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVatican CityVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishVirgin Islands, U.S.YemenZambiaZimbabwe País
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  • Cómo conoció a GAIA y por qué desea ser miembro?*
  • Tiene alguna conexión con GAIA? Si sí, por favor explique cuál.*
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Redes y Alianzas – Formulario membresía

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  • Red / Alianza representada*
  • Persona de contacto* Nombre Apellidos
  • Posición / Título*
  • Correo electrónico*
  • Página web / Facebook
  • Número de teléfono*
  • Dirección* Calle y número Ciudad Estado / Provincia / Región Código postal AfghanistanAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBrazilBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaColombiaComorosCongo, Democratic Republic of theCongo, Republic of theCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEast TimorEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFaroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench PolynesiaGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuamGuatemalaGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiNorth KoreaSouth KoreaKosovoKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMauritaniaMauritiusMexicoMicronesiaMoldovaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSaint MartinSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint MaartenSlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSpainSri LankaSudanSudan, SouthSurinameSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTogoTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVatican CityVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishVirgin Islands, U.S.YemenZambiaZimbabwe País
  • Región*América Latina y el CaribeAfrica y el Medio OrienteEstados Unidos y CanadáEuropa y el MediterráneoAsia Pacífico
  • Por favor confirme que está autorizada/o a repressentar a su red/alianza oficialmente*
  • Núnero de miembros de la red/alianza*
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  • Por favor indique los aspectos de justicia medioambiental y residuos en que su red/alianza está más involucrada y puede jugar un papel activo.*
    • Incineración
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  • Cómo conocieron a GAIA y por qué desean ser miembros?*
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Organizaciones – Formulario membresía

  • Ha leído y acepta la misión y acuerdos de GAIA?*
  • Nombre de la organización*
  • Persona de contacto* Nombre Apellidos
  • Posición / Título*
  • Correo electrónico*
  • Página web / Facebook
  • Dirección* Calle y número Ciudad Estado / Provincia / Región Código postal AfghanistanAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBrazilBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaColombiaComorosCongo, Democratic Republic of theCongo, Republic of theCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEast TimorEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFaroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench PolynesiaGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuamGuatemalaGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiNorth KoreaSouth KoreaKosovoKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMauritaniaMauritiusMexicoMicronesiaMoldovaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSaint MartinSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint MaartenSlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSpainSri LankaSudanSudan, SouthSurinameSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTogoTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVatican CityVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishVirgin Islands, U.S.YemenZambiaZimbabwe País
  • Región*América Latina y el CaribeAfrica y el Medio OrienteEstados Unidos y CanadaEuropa y el MediterráneoAsia Pacífico
  • Por favor confirme que está autorizada/o a representar a su organización oficialmente*
  • Describa brevemente la naturaleza y objetivos de su organización*
  • Describa brevemente las actividades que desarrolla su organización e indique si éstas se llevan a cabo a nivel local, nacional o internacional
  • Cómo conocieron a GAIA y por qué desean ser miembros?*
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California’s rent control initiative was crushed in the election. Don’t expect the issue to go away

Public Advocates - Thu, 11/08/2018 - 10:09

November 8, 2018Liam Dillon of the Los Angeles Times writes about next steps for tenant advocates after Proposition 10 failed to pass. Proposition 10 would have repealed Costa-Hawkins, a law that puts restrictions on rent control across California. Policy Advocate Michelle Pariset is quoted in this article.

Click here to read the article.

The post California’s rent control initiative was crushed in the election. Don’t expect the issue to go away appeared first on Public Advocates.

Alameda County is officially powered by East Bay Community Energy

East Bay Community Energy (EBCE) is now the official electricity provider for Alameda County*, soon serving over 1.5 million people! EBCE joins the ranks of nearly 20 public, non-profit Community Choice energy agencies now serving residents and businesses across California.   Thanks to years of organizing by the East Bay Clean Power Alliance, a project of the Local Clean Energy Alliance, EBCE is the only Community Choice energy agency to launch with a genuine roadmap to ensuring community benefits through developing local clean energy resources: the Local Development Business Plan.   EBCE launched for residential customers on November 1st, following the launch for municipal and commercial customers in June.   *Note: EBCE serves all residents and businesses in Alameda County, excluding the cities of Alameda, Pleasanton, and Newark.   Join us November 15th for a Clean Power to the People Workshop The Local Clean Energy Alliance is now gearing up curriculum for further advocacy on Early Actions identified in the Local Development Business Plan with a “Clean Power to the People workshop” on Nov 15: WHAT: Clean Power to the People - Phase 3: Implementation & Budgets for Local Clean Energy WHEN: Thursday, November 15 at 12:30-2:30pm (with lunch), more details + RSVP here. WHERE: 1200 Harrison in Downtown Oakland, off 12th Street Oakland BART   Join us to learn more about opportunities for Community Shared Solar, a Community Investment Fund, Community Net Energy Metering, and more. We will prioritize projects and programs that have the potential to bring clean energy benefits to low-income communities, people of color and all household-residential ratepayers--communities traditionally shut out of the clean energy economy.   

October 2018: Huge fair housing wins!

Public Advocates - Wed, 11/07/2018 - 15:09

Click here to read the October 2018 newsletter.

The post October 2018: Huge fair housing wins! appeared first on Public Advocates.

Sacramento rent-control advocates push forward despite statewide Prop. 10 failure

Public Advocates - Wed, 11/07/2018 - 09:55

November 7, 2018 – Tony Bizjak of the Sacramento Bee writes about Sacramento’s rent control plans in light of the failure of Proposition 10 at the ballot box. Proposition 10 would have repealed Costa-Hawkins, a law that placed statewide limits on rent control. Policy Advocate Michelle Pariset is quoted in the story.

Click here to read the story.

The post Sacramento rent-control advocates push forward despite statewide Prop. 10 failure appeared first on Public Advocates.

Black Communities Must Be at the Center of the Environmental Movement

Climate Justice Alliance - Fri, 11/02/2018 - 09:07

While it is generally accepted within environmental and social justice circles that those of us on the frontlines of the climate crisis are impacted first and worst because of racism and poverty, we often don’t consider how the whitewashing of the mainstream environmental movement has prevented the leadership development of talented and inspiring black and brown youth within our movement.

Black communities continue to be disproportionately burdened by some of the worst environmental injustices across the US, yet it remains extremely hard to access funding and political support for the thought leadership of our communities leading the fight against climate change, toxic pollution and waste, and the “dig, burn, drive, dump” industries causing these existential crises. This has everything to do with racism and the way in which our bodies are seen as disposable by greedy corporations and governments, and similarly portrayed as voiceless victims by those professing to be our allies.  

Simply put, we remain invisible as protagonists in this struggle, even though we have always been there and will continue to lead the fight against the oppression of our communities. A space to discuss such challenges that continue to impede the growth of the environmental justice movement in honest and constructive ways is now needed more than ever. In part, that is why we are organizing the Black 2 Just Transition Assembly and Training in Detroit, Michigan from November 8-12.

Grassroots organizers from African American and other low-income communities of color, on the frontlines of the ecological crises and the extractive economy causing these crises, will convene in a city that has been a historic hub for visionary, black liberation struggles and organized resistance. Together, we will examine systemic change pathways away from destructive industries toward models that center the health, well-being and self-determination of our communities, in short a Just Transition.

Our trainings will center the lessons, principles & practices of Black Liberation, Indigenous sovereignty, healing, environmental justice and other allied struggles for decolonization. This historic assembly will be an intergenerational organizing space (check out this warm welcome from our youth!), where we will cultivate new narratives for organizing an economy that is purposed to restore our relations with the earth and each other. Grounding our work in Just Transition campaign strategies, organizing skill shares, political education, and practices for movement care and healing, we aim to foster ongoing collaboration amongst a number of community groups across the nation, sharing replicable strategies and tools for organizing at the intersection of race, poverty and the environment.

As we find ourselves in a time of increasing racism, white nationalism and corporate control, with little time left to salvage the planet as we know it, centering the leadership of black communities in forging a Just Transition is paramount to our success. Fostering increased participation and leadership from our communities must be a priority for us all, especially from those within the environmental movement.

–East Michigan Environmental Action Council (EMEAC)

The post Black Communities Must Be at the Center of the Environmental Movement appeared first on Climate Justice Alliance.

California needs a new master plan to close the education equity gap

Public Advocates - Thu, 11/01/2018 - 09:56

In his OpEd featured in EdSource, Public Advocates’ John Affeldt calls on California’s next governor to take bold steps to address the massive educational equity gap threatening the state’s future prosperity. “What’s needed  to unlock the full potential of all our children is a new, broadly supported “Master Plan” for investing the riches of the world’s fifth largest economy at every level of public education,” writes Affeldt.

To read the entire OpEd, click here

 

 

The post California needs a new master plan to close the education equity gap appeared first on Public Advocates.

Individuals membership application form

GAIA Membership Request - Individuals

  • Have you read and do you accept the GAIA member agreements?*
    • Yes
  • Name* First Last
  • Are you affiliated with an organization? If so, which one?
  • Email address*
  • Website / Facebook
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  • Address* Street Address City State / Province / Region ZIP / Postal Code AfghanistanAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBrazilBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaColombiaComorosCongo, Democratic Republic of theCongo, Republic of theCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEast TimorEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFaroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench PolynesiaGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuamGuatemalaGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiNorth KoreaSouth KoreaKosovoKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMauritaniaMauritiusMexicoMicronesiaMoldovaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSaint MartinSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint MaartenSlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSpainSri LankaSudanSudan, SouthSurinameSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTogoTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVatican CityVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishVirgin Islands, U.S.YemenZambiaZimbabwe Country
  • Region*Africa & Middle EastLatin America and the CaribbeanEurope & the MeditterraneanUS & CanadaAsia Pacific
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Networks and alliances membership application form

GAIA Membership Request - Network/Alliance

  • Have you read and do you accept the GAIA member agreements?*
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  • Network / Alliance represented*
  • Name of contact person* First Last
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  • Address* Street Address City State / Province / Region ZIP / Postal Code AfghanistanAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBrazilBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaColombiaComorosCongo, Democratic Republic of theCongo, Republic of theCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEast TimorEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFaroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench PolynesiaGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuamGuatemalaGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiNorth KoreaSouth KoreaKosovoKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMauritaniaMauritiusMexicoMicronesiaMoldovaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSaint MartinSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint MaartenSlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSpainSri LankaSudanSudan, SouthSurinameSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTogoTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVatican CityVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishVirgin Islands, U.S.YemenZambiaZimbabwe Country
  • Region*Africa & Middle EastLatin America and the CaribbeanEurope and the MediterraneanUS & CanadaAsia Pacific
  • Confirm that you are authorized to officially represent your network/alliance*
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  • How did you learn about GAIA and why do you want to become a member?*
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Organizations membership application form

GAIA Membership Request - Organizations

  • Have you read and do you accept the GAIA member agreement?*
    • Yes
  • Organization Name*
  • Name of contact person* First Last
  • Title / Position*
  • Email address*
  • Website / Facebook
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  • Address* Street Address City State / Province / Region ZIP / Postal Code AfghanistanAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBrazilBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaColombiaComorosCongo, Democratic Republic of theCongo, Republic of theCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEast TimorEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFaroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench PolynesiaGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuamGuatemalaGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiNorth KoreaSouth KoreaKosovoKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMauritaniaMauritiusMexicoMicronesiaMoldovaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSaint MartinSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint MaartenSlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSpainSri LankaSudanSudan, SouthSurinameSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTogoTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVatican CityVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishVirgin Islands, U.S.YemenZambiaZimbabwe Country
  • Region*Africa & Middle EastLatin America and the CaribbeanEurope and the MediterraneanUS & CanadaAsia Pacific
  • Confirm that you are authorized to officially represent your organization*
    • Yes
  • Describe the nature of your organization and its goals*
  • Briefly describe the activities of your organization and indicate whether these are done at a local, national or international level*
  • How did you learn about GAIA and why do you want to become a member?*
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The election is over, but the fight is just beginning

Climate Justice Alliance - Wed, 10/31/2018 - 07:00

Photo “Ato ‘Mulheres contra Bolsonaro'” by Renato Gizzi, licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Jair Bolsonaro’s win of the presidential vote in Brazil on September 28, 2018 is devastating, given his previous comments supporting torture and calling for political opponents to be shot. As well as comments disparaging women, people of color, the Indigenous and LGBTQ people, and his pledged to open up the Amazon for agribusiness and mining.

CJA stands with the popular movements of Brazil, who have been so critical, inspirational, and developmental to popular movements around the world. They will all need our solidarity in this period ahead.

Statement by the Frente Brasil Popular and Povo Sem Medo:

“We hold our heads up resisting for Brazil!”

We lived an entirely atypical electoral process. Since the end of the military period, we have not had the political imprisonment of a leader, such as Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, who was unjustly convicted and whose candidacy was contested by the Superior Electoral Court. A process in which forces that had so far operated in the in the undergrounds, have emerged in the presidential dispute provoking a great wave of hatred and violence against the Brazilian people.

Our candidacy was a democratic response to arbitration that has contaminated the political scene since the parliamentary coup that overthrew President Dilma Rousseff in 2016. We faced abuses and scams practiced by networks committed to petty anti-popular, anti-democratic and anti-national interests.

The election of Bolsonaro represents a political rupture, whose signs are represented in the murder of Marielle, of Moa Katendê – black leader, capoeirista in Bahia, Charlione – a young man from Ceará who was taking part in an election parade in support to Haddad’s candidacy. They threaten our lives because we fight for an equal and just country.

Photo Mulheres Unidas Contra Bolsonaro by Esdras Beleza, licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

Even under bullets, we have resisted defending national sovereignty, raped in so many ways in the last two years. Protected by sectors of the judicial system and the monopoly media, the candidate Mr Bolsonaro was left free to finance his lying machine with clandestine money, incite violence against his opponents, escape public debates and circumvent electoral rules.

These forces, through deception and truculence, with maneuvers still subject to investigations, arrived at the Presidency of the Republic.
Despite so many obstacles, our alliance organized a powerful resistance throughout the country, which led to the realization of the second round and a formidable movement in defense of civilization against barbarism, democracy against dictatorship, love against hate.

In this second round, which ended yesterday, men and women from all quarters have expressed their support for the constitutional pillars of our country. This journey would never have been possible, however, without the dedication and courage of the social movements and democratic sectors of society.

We will continue to defend the Constitution, social diversity, the rights of all, a Brazil for all and fight the danger of dictatorship, the elimination of social achievements, the sale of public assets, the delivery of national wealth, racism and misogyny, homophobia and the threat of institutionalized violence.

At the moment, it is essential to remain together and cohesive around democracy, national sovereignty and rights.

We must not let ourselves be overwhelmed by fear, for we have each other. Different from what they think, the Brazilian people will know how to resist.

October 28, 2018
Brazil Popular Front
Fearless People’s Front

 

Much respect and love to Jihan Hafiz who is in Brazil covering the people’s side of the terrible election outcomes. She did some incredible coverage of #Sol2Sol while in Bay Area. She is an incredible journalistic videographer that works with CJA and is deeply committed to freedom and liberation for all people. #elpueblounido #Brazillibre

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