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Washington Corner January 2023

National Farmers Union - Tue, 01/24/2023 - 07:58
Following a productive two years on Capitol Hill, the 118th Congress was set to be sworn in shortly after noon on January 3. However, disagreement and dissent in Congress resulted in some initial delays. The Senate started business right on time. However, the House had a lengthy holdup due to a drawn-out debate and election […]
Categories: A3. Agroecology

Off-the-Charts PFAS in Maryland Biosolid Fertilizers

PEER - Tue, 01/24/2023 - 07:48

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday, January 24, 2023
CONTACT
Tim Whitehouse, PEER, twhitehouse@peer.org, (240) 247-0299
Caroline Taylor, Montgomery Countryside Alliance, Caroline@mocoalliance.org, (301) 461-9831
Steven Findlay, Sugarloaf Citizens Association, stevenfindlay2@gmail.com, (301) 908-8659

 

 

Off-the-Charts PFAS in Maryland Biosolid Fertilizers Call for Montgomery County Ban on Biosolids to Stem Water Contamination

 

Silver Spring, MD — Laboratory testing of biosolid fertilizers sold in Maryland has confirmed ultra-high levels of toxic per and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), according to results released today by Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER). PEER, the Montgomery Countryside Alliance, and the Sugarloaf Citizens Association are asking Montgomery County officials to prohibit the application of class A and B biosolids, such as Bloom fertilizer products, on county agriculture fields, golf courses and public lands to prevent further contamination of ground and surface waters.

PFAS from biosolids migrate to surface water and groundwater. They are also taken up by plants and ingested by humans and livestock. PFAS in biosolid fertilizers have led to shutdowns of dairies, ranches, and other farming operations in states from Maine to New Mexico.

PFAS are called “forever chemicals” because they do not break down in the environment. Virtually every PFAS studied for toxicity is associated with adverse health effects ranging from thyroid dysfunction to liver and kidney cancers. PFAS also are especially deleterious to children, causing problems from delayed development to decreased response to vaccines.

“These are some of the highest levels of PFAS in biosolids we have seen in the country,” stated PEER Executive Director Tim Whitehouse, a former enforcement attorney with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and resident of Poolesville. “We are urging Montgomery County to take immediate steps to stop the use of contaminated sewage sludge on county farms and other lands.”

Eurofins Laboratory testing of Bloom biosolid fertilizer commissioned by PEER shows –

    • PFOA (a major form of PFAS) levels of 21 parts-per-billion (ppb). This is 5.3 million times higher than the EPA Lifetime Health Advisory Level for PFOA in drinking water, which is .004 parts- per-trillion;
    • PFOS (another major PFAS) levels of 26 ppb parts, an amount is that is 1.3 million times higher than EPA’s Lifetime Health Advisory Level for PFOS in drinking water, which is .02 ppb; and
    • Dangerously high levels of other PFAS, such as PFHpA and PFBS, which were found at 65 ppb and 30 ppb, respectively.

Bloom fertilizer is used in northwest Montgomery County where much of this area, including Poolesville, is dependent on a sole source aquifer for drinking water, irrigation of croplands and support of livestock. Poolesville recently closed two drinking water wells due to high levels of PFOA and PFOS. While the source of this contamination is not known, Upper Montgomery County’s sole source aquifer is particularly vulnerable to contamination from biosolids because of the area’s thin soils and fractured bedrock.

“We can no longer turn a blind eye to the astronomically high levels of PFAS in these biosolids” said Caroline Taylor, Executive Director of the Montgomery Countryside Alliance. “Spreading these toxic chemicals on our farmlands and in our neighborhoods threatens the communities and livelihoods of those living in Montgomery County’s Agricultural Reserve.”

“In Montgomery County, people are purchasing biosolids without knowing they contain extremely high levels of these persistent and harmful chemicals,” added Steven Findlay, President of the Sugarloaf Citizens Association. “We need to do everything we can to protect our food and water from PFAS contamination.”

###

Read the PEER letter to Montgomery County officials

See summary of test results

View the full lab report

Look at threat posed by PFAS in biosolid fertilizers

The post Off-the-Charts PFAS in Maryland Biosolid Fertilizers appeared first on PEER.org.

Categories: A2. Green Unionism

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers storm surge study: Virtual public meeting

River Keeper - Tue, 01/24/2023 - 06:47

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District is holding a series of public meetings as part of its New York & New Jersey Harbors and Tributaries Study. This is an opportunity to become informed and speak out about a set of proposed, massive-scale construction projects meant to address flood risk from coastal storms in the New York – New Jersey region over the course of decades.

Virtual sessions are scheduled for 2-4 p.m. on Wednesday, February 1, and 6-8 p.m. on Monday, February 6. Several in-person meetings are also being scheduled with intent of being hybrid (having a WebEx call-in option); however, some venues may not be capable of supporting this option. Visit the project website for details on additional meetings and check back for updates. For the two virtual sessions February 1 and 6, use the information below to participate online or by phone.

Join online: https://usace1.webex.com/meet/bryce.w.wisemiller

Join by phone: +1-844-800-2712 US Toll Free | +1-669-234-1177 US Toll | Access code: 1995 71 9950

The Corps’ proposal calls for 12 storm gates in the water across the mouths of Gowanus Canal, Newtown Creek, Flushing Creek and other waters surrounding New York Harbor, and extensive shoreline walls in the New York – New Jersey region. This opens a new and critical phase of flood protection planning for the region. In consultation with community partners and others, Riverkeeper is assessing the proposed flood protection measures, examining the presumed benefits along with the profound impacts they could have on waterways, neighborhoods and habitats.

The Corps, with partners New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, New York Department of State and New York City Mayor’s Office of Climate and Environmental Justice, seeks public input on the tentatively selected plan, known as “Alternative 3B.”

Comments may be submitted in person, or by March 7, 2023, electronically or via mail to:

Mr. Bryce W. Wisemiller, Project Manager
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers New York District
Jacob K. Javits Federal Building, Room 17-401
c/o PSC Mail Center
26 Federal Plaza
New York, New York 10278
nynjharbor.tribstudy@usace.army.mil

or

Ms. Cheryl R. Alkemeyer, NEPA Lead
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
New York District
Jacob K. Javits Federal Building, Room 17-420
c/o PSC Mail Center
26 Federal Plaza
New York, New York 10278
nynjharbor.tribstudy@usace.army.mil

To receive email updates from the Corps, send a request to: NYNJHarbor.TribStudy@usace.army.mil

For more information

Riverkeeper update: Army Corps announces preferred plan in storm surge barrier study for NY-NJ

Project page: New York & New Jersey Harbors and Tributaries Study

See the Army Corps Draft Integrated Feasibility Report and Tier 1 Environmental Impact Statement: Read the report (PDF) and view an interactive NYNJHAT Study Story Map

To receive email updates from Riverkeeper, sign up here.

The post U.S. Army Corps of Engineers storm surge study: Virtual public meeting appeared first on Riverkeeper.

Categories: G1. Progressive Green

GTA's Periodical: Weaving Alternatives - [Past issues]

Global Tapestry of Alternatives - Tue, 01/24/2023 - 06:43
GTA's Periodical: Weaving Alternatives Subscription You can directly in the RiseUp page of the mailing list. Latest periodical * WEAVING ALTERNATIVES #09: Social Movements and (December 2022) Past issues * Newsletter 01 (July 2020) * Newsletter 02 (October 2020) * Newsletter 03 (February 2021) * Newsletter 04 (May 2021) * Newsletter 05 (September 2021) -

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers storm surge study: Virtual public meeting

River Keeper - Tue, 01/24/2023 - 06:41

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District is holding a series of public meetings as part of its New York & New Jersey Harbors and Tributaries Study. This is an opportunity to become informed and speak out about a set of proposed, massive-scale construction projects meant to address flood risk from coastal storms in the New York – New Jersey region over the course of decades.

Virtual sessions are scheduled for 2-4 p.m. on Wednesday, February 1, and 6-8 p.m. on Monday, February 6. Several in-person meetings are also being scheduled with intent of being hybrid (having a WebEx call-in option); however, some venues may not be capable of supporting this option. Visit the project website for details on additional meetings and check back for updates. For the two virtual sessions February 1 and 6, use the information below to participate online or by phone.

Join online: https://usace1.webex.com/meet/bryce.w.wisemiller

Join by phone: +1-844-800-2712 US Toll Free | +1-669-234-1177 US Toll | Access code: 1995 71 9950

The Corps’ proposal calls for 12 storm gates in the water across the mouths of Gowanus Canal, Newtown Creek, Flushing Creek and other waters surrounding New York Harbor, and extensive shoreline walls in the New York – New Jersey region. This opens a new and critical phase of flood protection planning for the region. In consultation with community partners and others, Riverkeeper is assessing the proposed flood protection measures, examining the presumed benefits along with the profound impacts they could have on waterways, neighborhoods and habitats.

The Corps, with partners New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, New York Department of State and New York City Mayor’s Office of Climate and Environmental Justice, seeks public input on the tentatively selected plan, known as “Alternative 3B.”

Comments may be submitted in person, or by March 7, 2023, electronically or via mail to:

Mr. Bryce W. Wisemiller, Project Manager
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers New York District
Jacob K. Javits Federal Building, Room 17-401
c/o PSC Mail Center
26 Federal Plaza
New York, New York 10278
nynjharbor.tribstudy@usace.army.mil

or

Ms. Cheryl R. Alkemeyer, NEPA Lead
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
New York District
Jacob K. Javits Federal Building, Room 17-420
c/o PSC Mail Center
26 Federal Plaza
New York, New York 10278
nynjharbor.tribstudy@usace.army.mil

To receive email updates from the Corps, send a request to: NYNJHarbor.TribStudy@usace.army.mil

For more information

Riverkeeper update: Army Corps announces preferred plan in storm surge barrier study for NY-NJ

Project page: New York & New Jersey Harbors and Tributaries Study

See the Army Corps Draft Integrated Feasibility Report and Tier 1 Environmental Impact Statement: Read the report (PDF) and view an interactive NYNJHAT Study Story Map

To receive email updates from Riverkeeper, sign up here.

The post U.S. Army Corps of Engineers storm surge study: Virtual public meeting appeared first on Riverkeeper.

Categories: G1. Progressive Green

“We shouldn’t be afraid of involving businesses”: Doughnut Economics in Brussels

Green European Journal - Tue, 01/24/2023 - 06:35

Kate Raworth’s doughnut model is an economic theory designed to easily and intelligibly assess an economy’s sustainability. Visually represented in the shape of a doughnut, it combines the concepts of planetary boundaries and minimum social standards to measure economic performance. Major European cities such as Amsterdam, Geneva and Brussels, have adopted the doughnut model to guide their green transitions. Barbara Trachte, secretary of state of the Brussels-Capital Region, responsible for Economic Transition and Scientific Research, explains how Brussels is using the the model to set a new direction for the city region’s economy.

Green European Journal: What made you decide to adopt the doughnut economics model in the Brussels-Capital region?

Barbara Trachte: At the beginning of my term, in July 2019, we decided to rename the Brussels-Capital Region’s Ministry for the Economy as the “Ministry for Economic Transition” to really show that we were going in a different direction. It was about aligning economic development with our social and environmental objectives and trying to transform Brussels’ economy to make it environmentally and socially responsible. Before I got there, there were just a few piecemeal and one-off initiatives. Traditionally, climate and social goals have been considered economic externalities. It’s only recently that they have become a central issue.

Until now, looking at the economy hasn’t necessarily been a priority for Greens. Yet the economy is a huge factor in climate change. In 2019, with many years of experience in government behind us, we decided that it was very important to invest in this area too. The first thing that we needed was a theoretical tool. Regional development policies had some very comprehensive programmes to support businesses in the transition, but there was no overall vision or real consideration of environmental impacts. So we needed indicators, a compass for our government agencies. First of all, we wanted to conduct participatory research together with government agencies and the public, to find new indicators and to internalise what were once considered “externalities”. The book Doughnut Economics had just come out and it seemed appealing to us because it was very easy to understand. For once, we had a comprehensive picture of the environmental and social impacts of the economy and how to fully take them both into account. The biggest strength of the growth model that still dominates economics is that it’s a curve that everyone understands.

Doughnut Economics allowed us to explain our plan to government agencies so that they really grasped what we wanted to do.

The BrusselsDonut project began development in 2020. How has the process gone since then, particularly in the context of the pandemic? What has it achieved concretely?

We worked with the research non-profit Confluences, ICHEC Research Lab, government agencies as well as Kate Raworth and her team at the DEAL on the project. The first stage was funding the research, then working on a way of scaling down the doughnut to regional size. Once this stage was completed in 2020, amid the pandemic, the lessons learned enabled us to have a snapshot of the social and environmental impacts of the region’s economy, and to produce guides on applying this theory to specific strategies.

Finally, we had a clear methodology for a business to assess its environmental and social impact, both in its local area and beyond, as well as a methodology for explaining this theory to Brussels’ citizen-consumers. The core team was made up of a dozen people tasked with researching the methodology and writing the report. They went to see our government agencies, three businesses and members of the public. We would have liked to have reached far more people from the outset, but the pandemic made it difficult.

When you’re unfamiliar with the theory, the idea of a doughnut as a framework might appear gimmicky. Given that economics is seen as a “serious” subject, how were you and your doughnut idea initially received?

To be honest, it was much better received than I expected. A few months after our coalition agreement, this idea of economic transition was in vogue anyway. In 2019, before the pandemic, the European Commission had, for example, just unveiled its Green Deal. Then the Covid-19 crisis really showed how fragile supply chains were in our globalised world. As Greens, we had long known that this system was no good for the climate or society, but pandemic illustrated that it wasn’t even able to provide us with basic products like masks. Everybody realised that this globalised economy made our companies very vulnerable. And the current energy crisis, as well as successive scorching summers, have proven us right again. There was fertile ground.

The doughnut model imagines an outer circle of planetary boundaries that cannot be crossed and an inner circle of social rights that must be respected. What did it reveal about the environmental and social conditions in Brussels?

Unsurprisingly, Brussels exceeds a host of environmental limits. It was unsurprising because Kate Raworth had already applied her theory to typical “Global North” and “Global South” situations. Generally, in the North, we cross lots of planetary boundaries on the outside of the doughnut, but we do better on the inside by granting lots of social rights to citizens. In the South, it’s the other way around. In Brussels, for example, we realised that the region was spending seven times its carbon budget. But the biggest surprise came from the social foundation, where we saw that we had gone into the red quite a bit inside our doughnut. This is partly explained by the fact that the targets for public services were set high by the citizens we consulted. Importantly, it demonstrated that need citizens if we are to meet their needs.

Did the pandemic also lead you to rethink Brussels’ economic model? Was there anything that surprised you or challenged your beliefs?

Quite the opposite. The pandemic confirmed a number of our intuitions. In March 2020, when we needed to produce masks because we didn’t have any left, the first businesses that stepped up came from the social and solidarity economy. Everything we’ve been saying for ages about resilience, the local economy, supply chains that don’t depend on exploited Chinese workers etc. Well, it works! In this unprecedented pandemic situation, it was the businesses we’ve always championed that were the first to respond. While this period was perhaps a revelation for some, it was really a validation for Greens. The social economy model has pioneered the economic transition and has shown its resilience in a crisis, because it meets local needs with jobs that cannot be offshored.

Change must always be properly supported, then it can stand the test of time.

Brussels is also an international city that is home to people, organisations and businesses with links throughout the world. Does BrusselsDonut address the impact Brussels has on other parts of the world?

Yes, the big advantage of doughnut economics is that it includes everything in terms of impact in a local area and outside of it, too. In Brussels, if we just look at environmental impacts and we just focus on the city, we will be able to reduce our direct impacts. But in Brussels, over 80 per cent of our emissions are indirect and related to what we import for consumption (food, transport etc.). With doughnut economics, all of this is taken into account. This theory provides the tools that will enable these companies to change their business model, the way they work, as well as the products and services they offer. And this will allow us to re-orient our economic policy towards companies that have joined the transition or want to do so.


What’s your vision for a prosperous and sustainable future for the Brussels region? How will the region change and what will drive this change?

We’ve updated our business support tools, such as help in developing business models, assessing impacts, finding new customers, etc. We also now have an Economic Transition Fund with a clear strategy as well as precise and dynamic criteria. It’s no longer just about saying “yes, we’ll fund you” or “no, we won’t fund you”, but rather “you’re here at the moment, and if you go further this way, we’ll give you more funding”.

It’s also about bringing back industries to Brussels, because it’s mainly a service economy. We want more production in the city so that we’re more resilient and diversified. In Brussels, we want to see more self-employed people, more women entrepreneurs and more companies setting an example socially and environmentally. We’re heading in the right direction with lots of examples of Brussels businesses that are already there or making the transition.

But Brussels will never by a self-sufficient city. It’s still a service economy (93 per cent of jobs) and will stay that way, which makes sense given that it’s the capital of Belgium and Europe, with a wealth of connections and public and private institutions. As food self-sufficiency is also very low, we’d also like more farming, but there’s very little space.

We also have a community currency, the Zinne. We are helping this volunteer-led initiative to scale up by increasing the number of businesses that accept it, developing the electronic Zinne, collaborating with municipalities and boosting trade within the network. The Zinne is a tool for supporting the regional economy because it’s spent in the local area, unlike the euro.


The Brussels region has struggled to implement its sustainable mobility plan in some areas because of objections from residents unhappy about its impact on drivers. How can the region gain people’s support and understanding when it comes to the transition? What could and should it do differently?

Mobility policies are often met with resistance when they are implemented. And then, once the transition is complete and people have actually experienced the change, opposition disappears pretty fast. In the places with the strongest resistance in Brussels, this subsided fairly quickly in the end. In my own municipality of Schaerbeek, there was opposition to Good Move initially, but three months later it was gone. In the centre of Brussels, there’s no longer any resistance either and things are going relatively well even though there have been major changes.

As for shop owners, for example, we have to take their needs into account. There needs to be support alongside implementation, otherwise opposition will remain. For example, Brussels has many new cycling lanes. For shop owner, this means their goods can be delivered within minutes by back than waiting for a van to get through traffic then double park to offload deliveries. The alternative mobility routes have thus helped soften opposition that was felt in the beginning.

For you then, the best solution is to involve as many people as possible? Because Greens are often seen as preachy.

I don’t think we should expect to implement changes in, for example, mobility and have everybody onboard from the start. Regardless of the neighbourhood, behaviour change always scares people at the beginning. There are also shops that can’t be supplied overnight by cargo bike. Change must always be properly supported then it can stand the test of time. Everywhere, cities that have pedestrianised their centre, like Bordeaux, saw lots of opposition but today it’s a no brainer, including for shopkeepers.

Greens have a very good understanding of planetary boundaries thanks to the work of the scientific community and international processes such as the COP events. Is the doughnut model a way of making their commitment to social justice just as fundamental to their approach?

The doughnut model enables the link between social and environmental impacts to be clearly illustrated. It’s therefore a powerful communication tool. It’s crucial for Greens to talk more about the economy. We are very good on energy, biodiversity, mobility etc. On the economy, we have expertise that needs to be recognised.

There’s no time to lose. If we want to achieve our climate objectives for 2030 and 2050, we must work with businesses and encourage them to transition. I encourage Greens to make economic issues their own. We’re more credible than people think. For example, I met two women in Strasbourg, France who work with businesses every day: Lyon Metropole Vice President Emeline Baume and Strasbourg Eurometropole Vice President Anne-Marie Jean The three of us are doing the same thing in trying to get businesses in our regions to be more climate responsible, and the three of us are met with both opposition and openness.

What’s happening with the Green Deal, with the European taxonomy, with the world of finance and the banks, with workers themselves… is creating a favourable environment. In Brussels, companies tell me every day that when they want to hire young talent leaving university while graduates are increasingly asking for information about firms’ environmental and social impact.

We’ve now reached a point where we can accelerate things. Lots of businesses now believe that they have to act or else risk being hit hard by crises.

What advice would you give a city or region considering trying doughnut economics?

Participation really brings very nice surprises. We shouldn’t be afraid of involving businesses. Every day I work with socially or environmentally responsible businesses, but also with big supermarkets. They are increasingly willing to engage and work with us, recognising our legitimacy and expertise. So we should adopt doughnut economics by involving as many people as possible, including the stakeholders who seem furthest away from us.

This interview was conducted in November 2022 by Benjamin Joyeux on behalf of the Green European Journal.

Categories: H. Green News

Flexible copper sensor can detect  heavy metals in sweat

Mining.Com - Tue, 01/24/2023 - 06:30

An international team of researchers led by the University of São Paulo in Brazil has developed a portable copper sensor that is able to detect heavy metals such as lead and cadmium in sweat. 

In a paper published in the journal Chemosensors, the scientists explain that heavy metals are present in batteries, cosmetics, food and other things that are part of everyday life. When they accumulate in the human body, however, they can become toxic and cause health problems

High levels of cadmium can lead to fatal problems in the airways, liver and kidneys. Lead poisoning damages the central nervous system and causes irritability, cognitive impairment, fatigue, infertility, high blood pressure in adults and delayed growth and development in children,” Paulo Augusto Raymundo Pereira, last author of the article, said in a media statement.

According to Raymundo Pereira, humans eliminate heavy metals mainly in sweat and urine, and analyses of these biofluids are a vital part of toxicological tests as well as treatment.

So far, devices to detect heavy metals in biofluids have been made with expensive materials. The new solution, on the other hand, has been produced using polyethylene terephthalate [PET], on top of which there is a conductive flexible copper adhesive tape, a label of the kind that can be bought from a stationer’s with the sensor printed on it, and a protective layer of nail polish or spray.

“The exposed copper is removed by immersion in ferric chloride solution for 20 minutes, followed by washing in distilled water to promote the necessary corrosion,” study co-author Robson R. da Silva said. “All of this ensures speed, scalability, low power and low cost.”

The device is connected to a potentiostat, a portable instrument that determines the concentration of each metal by measuring differences in potential and current between electrodes. The results are displayed on a computer or smartphone using appropriate software.

In the researchers’ view, the system is simple enough to be used by non-specialists without training, as well as by technicians in hospitals, clinics and doctor’s offices. 

The device can also be used in several types of environmental management situations, such as artesian wells that are regulated and require constant monitoring to analyze water quality.

The sensor’s performance in detecting lead and cadmium was assessed in trials using artificial sweat enriched under ideal experimental conditions. Adaptations are required before the device can be patented.

SPC Nickel enters agreement with Vale to consolidate deposits in Sudbury camp

Mining.Com - Tue, 01/24/2023 - 06:09

SPC Nickel (TSXV: SPC) has entered into a cooperation agreement with Vale Canada that would see the company consolidate the West Graham and Crean Hill 3 nickel-copper deposits located in the Sudbury mining camp into a single project.

The West Graham deposit occurs on SPC’s 100% owned Lockerby East property, which also hosts the past-producing Lockerby East mine. The latest agreement would grant the company the right to acquire an 100% interest in the adjacent Crean Hill 3 property currently held by Vale.

The unmined near-surface West Graham deposit contains over 47,000 tonnes of nickel and 34,000 tonnes of copper, as defined in a technical report published by First Nickel in 2009 that supported an indicated mineral resource of 8.55 million tonnes grading 0.45% nickel and 0.31% copper, along with an inferred mineral resource of 2 million tonnes grading 0.38% nickel and 0.30% copper.

These grades, according to SPC, have economic potential in the context of the Sudbury mining camp, as the deposit is located very near to surface and may be amenable to low-cost open pit mining.

The deposit is characterized by a broad zone of blebby to semi-massive sulphide that ranges from 1.7 to 66 metres thick and strikes for 350 metres, with a dip extent of up to 533 metres. Within the larger resource, a distinct zone of higher-grade mineralization grading approximately 1% nickel equivalent is present.

The company recently completed an 18 hole, 5,200-metre drill program which has expanded the extents of the high-grade mineralized zone within the West Graham deposit while also adding confidence in the continuity of the resource. Results from this drilling campaign include 82.6 metres grading 0.68% nickel equivelent.

At the contiguous Crean Hill 3 property, historic drilling by Vale (formerly Inco) between 1958 and 1960 returned mineralized intersections of similar thickness and grade compared to the West Graham deposit. Drilling highlights include 44.48 metres grading 0.60% nickel and 0.27% copper from 436.89 metres, including 2.29% nickel and 0.30% copper over 4.42 metres.

Preliminary modelling of historic drill intersections suggests that the mineralized zone hosted on the Crean Hill 3 property extends from the SPC-Vale property boundary to the west for over 600 metres. Mineralized surface outcrops, interpreted to represent the up-dip extension of the West Graham deposit, outcrop along the exposed contact of the Sudbury basin. Mineralized grab samples with values of up to 1.56% nickel and 1.21% copper were collected by the company on the Crean Hill 3 property.

SPC believes that the West Graham and Crean Hill 3 deposits constitute the eastern and western contiguous portions of a large, near-surface nickel-copper sulphide deposit at the base of the Sudbury igneous complex. The properties are located adjacent to the past-producing Lockerby and Crean Hill mines, approximately 20 km southwest of of Sudbury, Ontario, and Vale’s Clarabelle mill.

Pursuant to the Vale cooperation agreement, the company can now earn an 100% interest in the Crean Hill 3 property from surface down to an elevation of 264.3 metres below mean sea level (a total of 550 vertical metres) upon delivering a feasibility study for the project by the deadline of June 30, 2026, and paying Vale C$1 million at the deadline.

Upon earning its 100% interest in the Crean Hill 3 property, SPC will grant Vale certain rights and royalties over the combined project, including a 1% net smelter return royalty and a net profits royalty of 37%. Vale will also retain a right of first refusal over the sale of the project as well as ore/concentrates produced from the project.

“With the addition of the Crean Hill 3 property, we see a path for SPC Nickel to significantly grow the West Graham deposit into a high-quality nickel-copper asset in one of the top nickel mining camps in the world,” SPC Nickel’s CEO Grant Mourre commented.

The Sudbury mining camp is considered the largest nickel camp in the world with over 130 years of continuous production. Since the discovery of the original ore deposits, over 11.1 million tonnes of nickeland 10.8 million tonnes of copper, together with byproducts of cobalt, silver, gold and platinum group elements have been mined from the Sudbury deposits.

“Our recently completed drill program at West Graham has provided the technical team with a firm understanding of the types of mineralization we expect to define on the Crean Hill 3 property and, more importantly, the controls on mineralization that we expect to guide us to higher-grade opportunities across the combined project,” Mourre added.

Shares of SPC Nickel were up 20% by market close Monday, giving the company a market capitalization of C$15 million.

New report lays out roadmap for comprehensive US offshore wind supply chain

Renewable Energy Magazine - Tue, 01/24/2023 - 05:39
The Business Network for Offshore Wind National Offshore Wind, in partnership with Research and Development Consortium (NOWRDC), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and others has released a report identifying how the United States can develop a robust and equitable domestic supply chain to achieve the national offshore wind target of 30 GW by 2030.

Sol Systems acquires 190 MW Texas solar project from ABEI Energy

Renewable Energy Magazine - Tue, 01/24/2023 - 05:39
Washington, D.C.-based Sol Systems, LLC has announced the acquisition of a 190-megawatt (MW) solar development project in Uvalde County, TX from Madrid-based ABEI Energy.

Long-term regulatory and policy changes needed to avoid stalls to business decarbonisation finds Cornwall Insight report

Renewable Energy Magazine - Tue, 01/24/2023 - 05:39
A new report from Cornwall Insight has set out a range of regulation and policy changes the UK Government could examine if it wants to avoid a slowdown or stalling of business investment in decarbonisation.

K2 Management to support hybrid renewables in 2023

Renewable Energy Magazine - Tue, 01/24/2023 - 05:39
Renewable energy engineering and project management consultancy K2 Management (K2M) has announced that it will begin offering technical due diligence, energy yield analysis and lenders advisory services for hybrid wind and solar projects across Europe in 2023.

Wind Farm Funding Helps Fight Social Isolation in Small Community

Renewable Energy Magazine - Tue, 01/24/2023 - 05:39
Leadhills Family Action Group (LFAG) has been granted £9,605 from the Renewable Energy Fund (REF) - a fund distributed by South Lanarkshire Council utilizing funding from Banks Renewables' nearby wind farm developments including Kype Muir and Middle Muir wind farms.

TotalEnergies Commissions BioBéarn Anaerobic Digestion Unit in France

Renewable Energy Magazine - Tue, 01/24/2023 - 05:39
TotalEnergies has launched its 18th biogas production unit in France, which will be the largest in the country with a maximum capacity of 160 gigawatt hours (GWh). Named BioBéarn and located in Mourenx in the southwest of France, this new unit, fed with organic waste, has begun feeding its first cubic meters of biomethane – a renewable, decarbonized and locally produced gas – into the natural gas transmission network operated by Téréga. 

Regen Fiber launches innovative method to recycle wind turbine blades

Renewable Energy Magazine - Tue, 01/24/2023 - 05:39
New Iowa business Regen Fiber has launched an innovative way to recycle wind turbine blades that are no longer in use, so they don’t end up in landfills, converting them instead into reusuable materials for manufacturers in the concrete, mortar and other industries.

How to Develop Infrastructure for an Electric and Renewable Revolution

Renewable Energy Magazine - Tue, 01/24/2023 - 05:39
The world is on the verge of a renewable energy revolution. Governments and public and private organizations alike have set goals for phasing out fossil fuels, including electrifying more processes and transitioning to green energy. It’s a noble and necessary shift — but it will require significant infrastructure development to work on a large scale.

GenComm Partners Report on Research Into Decarbonization

Renewable Energy Magazine - Tue, 01/24/2023 - 05:39
Two authors of a new white paper on ‘Alternative Powertrains and the challenges to decarbonize the Transport Sector’ are calling for more action from governments regarding the introduction of alternative powertrains  to fight CO2 emissions.

Minesto and SEV Strengthen Partnership for Tidal Energy Build-Out in the Faroe Islands

Renewable Energy Magazine - Tue, 01/24/2023 - 05:39
Minesto, a leading ocean energy developer, and SEV, Faroese utility company, have renewed and expanded the collaboration agreement outlining respective roles and responsibilities related to tidal energy build out in the Faroe Islands, including the ongoing electricity production in Vestmannasund and the first large scale tidal array in Hestfjord.

Coal states miss out on benefits of cheap wind and solar, pay twice the price of power

Renew Economy - Tue, 01/24/2023 - 05:01

States most dependent on fossil fuels hit by surging prices, despite lowest ever coal output, the lowest gas generation for 18 years, and record wind and solar.

The post Coal states miss out on benefits of cheap wind and solar, pay twice the price of power appeared first on RenewEconomy.

Survival International statement on Yanomami health emergency: a genocide foretold

Survival International - Tue, 01/24/2023 - 04:19

Desperately malnourished Yanomami children, Surucucus region. © URIHI – Associação Yanomami

Organization calls for six-point plan to address crisis

“The unprecedented and catastrophic health crisis engulfing the Yanomami people in northern Brazil is a genocide that’s been years in the making” said the head of Survival Brasil Sarah Shenker today.

“Former President Bolsonaro deliberately opened the gates to the territory and encouraged thousands of gold miners to flood in. He dismantled the Indigenous health service; cheered on the miners invading Indigenous territories; and ignored the desperate pleas for action from Indigenous organizations, Survival and many others when the scale of the crisis became clear.

“The miners – the diseases they’ve brought in, the mercury they’ve poisoned the rivers and people with, the forests they’ve destroyed and the violence they’ve unleashed – are the clear and obvious cause of this disaster.

“The results are well documented: 570 Yanomami children under 5 have died of preventable diseases since Bolsonaro came to power; Yanomami children are dying of malnutrition at a rate 191 times higher than the national average; 8 out of 10 Yanomami children in the regions of Auaris and Maturacá have chronic malnutrition; and so on.

“We’re pleased that President Lula has now called this what it is – a genocide. We’re calling for a six-point plan to be enacted as a matter of extreme urgency:

1. Remove the miners. This has been done before, in the 1990s, but it needs real political will, and the funds to carry it out.

2. Send in the health teams who are desperately needed, and ensure they have long-term funding.

3. Prosecute the politicians and businesspeople who have been profiting from this genocide, both in the state of Roraima and elsewhere.

4. Dismantle the violent criminal gangs who now operate in the area and prosecute those who attacked and murdered Yanomami.

5. Clean up the supply chains to ensure anyone buying Brazilian gold can be sure it’s been legally produced.

6. Ensure this can never happen again: Indigenous territories need proper protection from invasion and land theft, and the will to enforce it. Official monitoring posts near uncontacted Yanomami communities need reinforcing.

“The early signs of action from President Lula and his team are encouraging. They don’t have a minute to lose, and Brazil’s Indigenous organizations and Survival will be watching closely to see if deeds follow words.”

Notes to Editors:

Both Survival’s Research and Advocacy Director Fiona Watson, and head of Survival Brasil Sarah Shenker, know the Yanomami territory well and are available for interview.

Survival has fought alongside the Yanomami for decades. We led the international campaign for the demarcation of the Yanomami territory, along with Davi Kopenawa Yanomami and the Pro-Yanomami Commission (CCPY).

The Yanomami live in northern Brazil and southern Venezuela.

Categories: E1. Indigenous

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